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UCLA Daily Bruin 



Winter 1998 



; 



Los Angeles, CA 



Feb. 18-Mar. 19, 1998 



MN #03796 



/ 



► In s ido today 

Nke guys: will sensitivity toward 
women knock 'em dead? See |>age 3 

Just plain weird: MOCA expands 
the definition of art. Sec page 1 7 

McCoy-less: Shuffled UCU squad to 
face use tonight. See back page 



DAILY 



VIEWPOINT 





JUSTICE 

Criminals need 
more serious 
punishment. 
See page 13 



79th year CiituMon 20,000 



Wednesday, February 18, 1998 



www.daiiybnjin.ucla.edu 



Administration reallocates positions 




RESTRUCTURING: :JNew 

duties in academic plans 
given to vice chancellor 



By Mason StodBta 

Diiiy Bruin Senk>r Staff 

Responsibility for all of UCLA's 
academics has now been consolidated 
into fewer administrative hands. 

With restructuring at the highest 
level, the executive vice chancellor will 
tal(e over the academic planning 
duties previously held by the vice 
chancellor for academic planning and 
budget, which will become an entirely 
financial position. 

"The title was changed with the 
idea that academic planning is the 
responsibility of the executive vice 
chancellor, working closely with the 
chancellor," Chancellor Albert 
Camesale said. 



According to Ted Mitchell, the for- 
mer vice chancellor of academic plan- 
ning and budget, the new position will 
be 'Very difTcrcnt" from the previous 
position. 

"The new position is far more con- 
cerned with day-to-day issues of 
fmance and less directly involved in 
issues of academic budgeting," he 
said. 

MitcheH is now the vice chancdbr 
of external affairs, a position that he 
held last year in addition to vice chan- 
cellor of academic planning and bud- 
get. 

The position of vice chancellor of 
academic planning and budget was 
abolished when Mitchell recommend- 
ed to then-Chancellor Charles Young 
that a new position be created, effec- 
tively dividing academic and fmancial 
strategy. 

"I felt that the campus was best 
served by creating a new position,' 
Mitchel^said. 



Mitchell said that since the execu- 
tive vice chancellor was already the 
head of academic planning, having 
another vice chancellor doing the 
same thing was not necessary. 

"It didn't really make sense to have 
a vice chancellor charged with acade- 
mic budgeting reporting to the execu- 
tive vice chancellor in charge of acade- 
mics," he said. 

After consulting with Mitchell, 
Young decided that the responsibili- 
ties of academic planning were better 
left to the chancellor and executive 
vice chancellor. The new vice chancel- 
lor for budget and fmance will be the 
equivalent of a company's CFO. 

The p>osition of executive vice chan- 
cellor is al^ waiting to be filled, since 
Charles Kennel, who has held the posi- 
tion since 19%, will be leaving in the 
spring to head the Scripps institute of 
Oceanography at UCSD. 

Camesale said that he would be 
inclined to conskJer someone with a 



non^cademic background for the vice 
chancellorship of budget and fmance. 

"1 would expect the vice chancellor 
for budget and fmance to be a profes- 
sional in this area, rather than an acad- 
eqjic," he said. 

The chancellor also mentioned that 
he would not be averse to choosing 
someone from the private sector to 
take the helm of budget and fmance. 

"1 wouki like them to be somebody 
who has some private sector experi- 
ence," he said. 

Camesale was qukk to point out 
that while private sector experience in 
the area of budget and fmance would 
be a plus, it is necessary to choose 
someone who can work well in the 
unique environment of a large public 
university such as UCLA. 
' "It is important that they be able to 
function in the university environ- 
ment, which is substantially more col- 
legial than it is in the private sector," 
he said. 



Protesters reject military action in Iraq 



POLITICS: Gathering in 
Westwood opts stronger 
ties with Middle East 



By Urarmict Fflfcfww 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

On the day President Clinton 
spoke at the Pentagon to make his 
case for military action in Iraq, pro^ 
testers rejected his case at a demon- 
stration in Westwood. 

On Tuesday, the Save the Iraqi 
Children Committee organized a 
protest at the Federal Building in 
Westwood, which attracted a 
diverse mix of citizens ranging from 
Arab Americans to the Veterans for 
Peace. Despite the diversity of the 
protesters, the message was unified. 

"Bombing Iraq defeats the 
whole purpose of protecting 
humanity, " said Stacy Hartell, a 
use student. 

This meuage was echoed in the 
chants against the economic sanc- 
tions on Iraq, imposed at the end of 
the Gulf War seven years ago. 

Over l.S million people have 
died in Iraq because of the sanc- 
tiom, said Preston Wood, the co- 
coordinator of the rally. 

"All this talk of weapons of mass 
destruction does not take into 
account that the sanctions are a 
weapon of mass destruction," said 
Yasser Aman, a fifth-year cell and 
molecular biology student. 

Aman said he came to the rally to 
be a "voict of the oppressed " 

Despite the heavy drizzle at 
times, protesters formed a line 
along Wilshire Boulevard, holding 
posters and banners as they chant- 
ed for the United States to get 'out 
of the Middle East." Police 
watched from a distance while 
some protesters went out into the 
traffic to take their message to dri- 
vers. 

Protesters questioned the 




CHAfUS KlXV D«ty Brum 

A protesl te condemn mflitary action against Iraq was held in front of the Federal Building in 
Westwood. 



motives for possible military 
strikes, which could take place after 
a week if the Iraqi government does 
not allow full inspection by the 
United Nations. 

"This is a cover for the US to 
install a new leader in Iraq who will 
do what the U.S. wishes and turn 
over the oil," Wood said. 

Another demonstrator charac- 
terized the thinking behind a mili- 
tary strike as "cowboy thinking." 

The protesters focused on the 
well being of civilians, not a defense 
of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. 

Dan Dickesen, a member of the 
Socialist Workers Party, said that 
one day the people of Iraq should 
make Hussein face justice, but that 
this is not a job of the United States. 



In response to President 
Clinton's speech, Yousef Elia 
Haddad, a resident of the San 
Fernando Valley, said, "we don't 
buy his reasoning. There is a double 
standard when the resolutions 
against Iraq are so strictly enforced 
while resolutions against Israel are 
not." 

Rather than bombing Iraq, pro- 
testers offered alternatives to the 
current policy. Along with the idea 
that the United States should end 
all activities in the area, one protest- 
er thought stronger relations could 
improve the situation. 

"The U.S. should intensify con- 
tact with Iraq and become 
acquainted culturally. We should 
learn from each other and modify 



our and behavior and theirs," said 
Katherine Anderson, from Duluth. 
Minn. 

Hartell also talked about using 
more humanitarian reasoning 
^before using the military. 

"If people thought that those in 
the third world were equal to them. 
then they would have second 
thoughts. This is racist," she said. 

U.N. Secretary General Kofi 
Annan is currently planning a trip 
to Iraq to avert a military strike. 

President Clinton insisted on 
Tuesday that full compliance by 
Hussein is necessary to avert a mili- 
tary strike. Clinton said that such a 
strike woukl be "significant" and 
seriously damage Hussein's capa- 
bility to wage war. 



Pendk in hand, 
designers learn 
to depend less 
on computers 

PROFILE: Professor Ivan 
Chermayeff advocates 
flexibility, practical skills 



By H. Jayne Ahn and Andy Shah 

Daily Bruin Contributors 

Behind the famous symbols for 
NBC. Mobil, and Xerox is a man 
named Ivan Chermayeff, who likes 
"simplicity for its freshness" in graph- 
ic design. 

Chermayeff, an internationally- 
renowned graphic designer and 
artist, was appointed this year's Art 
Council Professor of Design and is 
currently sharing his expertise with a 
design class in the School of Arts and 
■ Architecture. 

Prior to taking his seminar, design 
students had to submit portfolios and 
be approved by the department. 

"Normally we do more theoretical 
stuff and computer in our depart- 
ment," said Jason Moskovitz, a third- 
year design student. 

"But (with Chermayeff) we are 
doing a lot of collage and cut-and- 
paste which is more 'real-world' than 
we are used to," Moskovitz said. 

Both. the students and the visiting 
professor seem to agree that they are 
trying new approaches to learning 
design. 

"The students are fun, articulate 
and hardworking. But they are rather 
unknowledgeable about other disci- 
plines and they delve very much into 
the computers and multimedia." 
Chermayeff said. 

"They don't draw, and they don't 
use their hands much. 1 think that's a 
shortcoming in how flexible they can 
be. 

"If you never hold a brush, or pen, 
or pencil in your hand and only press 
buttons, you are losing something," 
he said. 

The School of Arts and 
Architecture should be more "multi- 
disciplinary" and allow students to 
have some experiences in other ways 
of learning "besides moving mice 
around in the dark," according to 
Chermayeff. 

"Design is a service to other peo- 

Sc«a«UIMVEFF,pa9e10' 




CourtMy of School d Am «nd AKhilKnjK 

Design guru Ivan Ch«rmay«ff. 



r 



(.'•II. 



Wednesday, Febfuary 18, 1998 



Daily Bruin News 



We<iMMiay,FcbnMry18,199e 3 



COMMUNITY BRIEFS 



Breslow named chair 
of public health board 

Dr. Lester Breslow, an internationally rec- 
ognized publictwaltTi leader, has been named 
chairman of ^ Dean's Advisory Board of 
the UCLA School of Public Health. 

As chairman of the committee, Breslow 
will lead a group of friends of the school who 
help raise money for various projects. The 
school has embarked on a $15 million effort 
to raise funds for a new buihding and other 
critical needs, pad of UCLA's $1.2 billion 
fund-raising campaign. V . 

He is a former president of the American 
Public Health Association, dean emeritus of 
the UCLA School of Public Health and the 
current chair of the Public Health 
Commission of Los Angeles County. 

"My goal is to help the school and its 
friends focus on how they can best support 
teaching, research and service programs of a 
truly outstanding school whose impact on 
the public's health extends from Southern 



California to many of the most 
needy areas of the world," 
Breslow said. 



Berkeley's tutorial "- 
program helps youth 

UC Berkeley's educational outreach pro- 
gram, the Berkeley Pledge, has made advances 
in the mathematical aptitudes of students in the 
San Francisco Bay area. 

The program, established in 1995, targets dis- 
advantaged students and offers academic 
enrichment to facilitate future colle;ge educa- 
tions. Students in grades K-12 in more than 40 
San Francisco schools have shown improve- 
ment on standardized tests and exhibited more 
self confidence. 

"At the start of the semester, my students had 
a low sense of self. By the end of the semester, 
the change I saw was remarkable," said UC 
Berkeley undergraduate and tutor Michele 
Hamilton. 

High school students participating in the 




math programs earned grade 

pqint averages that were nearly 

one point higher than their peers 

who were not enrolled. 

The success of the Pledge's math program 

has prompted the launch of programs to 

improve students' reading and writing skills. 

Richard Avalos stated, "(The Pledge) coun- 
ters the inner city pod of negativism. ... It says to 
them, 'Sisepuede.'" 

University police say 
tactics surprised them 

Students protesting the end of affirmative 
action in admissions and hiring policies sought 
physical confrontation with university police in 
UC Berkeley's Sproul Hall last year, according 
to police. 

A confidential report obtained by The Daily 
Califomian stated that aggressive movements 
by the students caused surprised officers to react 
without regard to police guidelines. 

Protesters used tactics police said they had 



never seen before, including securing doors to 
the campus administration building with U- 
shaped bicycle locks and using a "ground-fight- 
ing" approach when confronting officers. 

The students' combative behavior "Sur- 
prised" police, who then reacted witb a flurry of 
baton blows against the protesters aAer they 
attempted to crash their way through police 
lines. 

"(Using the bicycle locks) meant that every- 
one on the first floor was trapped," said UC 
police Capt. Guillermo Beckford, the cono- 
manding officer at the time of the incident. 
"Public safety was in severe danger. We had not 
seen that tactic used before." 

The report, written by attorney Gregory Fox 
at the request of the university's police review 
board, said an internal review by the department 
acknoNvledged that officers were not ready for 
such aggressive actions. 

Members of the review board said that if the 
protesters' actions were unexpected, officers 
should have stuck to written policy. 



Compiled from Daily Bruin staff and wire reports. 




Isni It true Mr. "Big Bad Wotf" that you violated 
my clients restraining order not once, but twice! 
And if released, would do so a third time! 7 



LESS THAN ONE WEEK LEFT: 

Until class enrollment 
appointments begin through 
URSA Telephone. 

For undergraduates to 
change grading basis with a $3 
per-transaction fee. 

LESS THAN TWO WEEKS 
LEFT: 

Until UCLA billing statements 
are mailed 

To file financial aid applica- 
tions for 1 996 1 999. 

For continuing students to file 
applications for undergraduate 
scholarships f r 1998-1999. 

DONT FORGET: 

Need to talk? Call the peer 
helpline at 794-HELP. 

The spring Schedule of 
Classes is now on sale at the 
UCLA Store. 

Need an escort? Call 794- 
WALK. 



WHArS BREWIN' TODAY 



Wednesday 11a.m. 

African Graduation 
Bake Sale : — 

Come & Support African Grad '98 
Bruin Walk 

Noon 

Student Accounting Society 
Weekly Meeting 

A day in the life of an accountant in 
the entertainment industry. 
Ackerman 3517 -2014771 

Bruin Leaders Project 

Women's Assertiveness Clinic 

Seminar 

Dodd Hall 2 -205-5071 

United Methodist Campus Ministry 
Bible Study (12: 10) 
Ackerman Viewpoint Lourtge 
208-6869 



3 p.m. 

Urban Impact 
Orientation Meeting (3: 15) 
Meet at Lot 6 Turnaround 
824-1558 



^.^.Jl^.^ 



4 p.m. V 

UCLA Library 

Campbell Student Book Collection 

Contest 

BogkCoOecting 

Workshop for Entrants 

URL Dcpt. of Special Collections, 

Smith Room - 2064474 

Armenian Genocide 
Commemoration Committee 
Meeting No. 4 
Ackerman 3508 - 818-210^50 

Undergraduate Physics Society 
Aspen Center for Physics Public 
Lectures Video-tapes 
"Shadow of Creation: The Dark 
Matter in the Universe" (4:30) 
Knudsen 1220 

Spjn.- 

Buddhist Student Association 
General Meeting 
Ackerman 3508 '^ 

V 
GSA 

Forum ^ • 
KerckhofT 135 -206*512 



Office of Residential Life/CoUege 



of L & S Counseling 

Major Blast 

Find out about majors, minors, 

internships & more! 

For more info, contact your RA, 

CA.PAorGA '^ 

Grand Horizon Ballroom, Covel 

Commons -206-1742 

Career Center 

"Graduate School: Is it right for 

me?" Workshop 

Career Center 

Taiwanese American Union 

General Meeting and Guest 

Speaker 

Ackerman 2408 - 287-0474 . 



TAU 

Special speaker John Chiang, a 
candidate for the Board of 
Equilizatioii, speaks about 
community issues. 
Ackerman 2408 • 287-0474 

Watts Tutorial Project 
Tutoring Session (5:30) 
Bunche 3143 -208^)999 

6 p.m. 

ASME 

General Meeting 
Free Food and Games 
Boeker Hall Penthouse 

Bruin Leaders Project 

Challenges of Sexual Identity 

Dcvelopnjent 

West Coast Room, Covd 

Commons - 206-5071 

Muslim Union 

Qur'an Gass by Ustadha Maha 

Hamoui 

Math Sciences 5138 - 206-7877 

7 p.m. 

ALD/PES Honor Societies 
General Meeting 
Kinsey 364 -267-8166 

Melnitz Movies 
"Double Life of Vcronique" 
Free Screening (7:30) 
James Bridges Theater 
206*170 

What^ Brewin' can be 
reached via e-mail at whats- 
brewin@media.ucla.edu. 




The OaMy Bfu«n (ISSN KMO-MMO) »» published »nd copyrighled by the ASUCLA CommunkJttom Board A« rightj are rejefved Repfinftng of any material in thi» pobiicatlon wnthout the wrinen permlsjJon of the Communicatlont Board is sfrictty prohibited. The 
ASUCLA Communications Board fully supports the University of Ca^fornias policy on nor»-discrimir%alloo The student medU leserve the right to reject or modify advertising whose content discriminates on the basis of arKestry. color, national origin, race, religion, 
disability, age. sex or sexual orientation The ASUCLA Comrfiunicationt Board has a media grievance procedure for resolving complaints against any of its publications For a copy of the complete procedure, contact the publications office at 11 8 Kerckhoff Hall All 
Inserts that are printed In tf>e Daily Bruin are independently paid publications and do r>ol reflect the views of the Editorial Board or tfie staff 

, lit ltorcMM«f Haa, 9M Wa i twood Hnai, Lm Anffatoa. CA Mn4, (S10) US-MM, h«tr.//www.aa«lykniin.uch.«Ai, tax (310) 206-OM* 



Women claim to be searching for the perfect man, 
but what exactly are they looking for? 



By Marco Ponce Gmtrcras 

[^ily Bruin Contributor 

"Bill, you are so nice. Couldn't w^ just be 
friends?" How many times have guys heard 
these words? Once, twice, maybe more times 
than one would care to admit. 

Across college campuses nationwide, 
something persists which strums the back- 
bone of a num's dignity. Whether it afllicts 
them or makes them better, some guys have 
the dubious distinction of carrying the title of 
"The Nice Guy." 

Do women want a "macho man" or a 
"nice guy?" Several UCLA students were 
given the opportunity to answer that ques- 
tion. 

Ramon recalls being a "nice guy" since 
junior hi^. it all started way back when he 
asked his mom about a certain girl he was 
interested in. "Mom, do you think she is 
attractive?" Ramon asked. Her reply, 
"Ramon, every woman in this world is pretty 
and attractive. There is no such thing as an 
ugly woman." 

Today Ramon, 24, is a senior majoring in 
Latin American studies who keeps women ia 
high reverence because of his down4o<arth 
values his mother bestowed. "She taught me 
to respect other people," Ramon says. 

Another student brings a woman's point 
of view to the issue. A female student, De La 
Torre, who asked not to be identified by her 
Hrst name, a 22-year-old economics student 



in her first year at UCLA, says, "usually the 
nice guys are the ones that know how to 
respect women." 

When speaking of mothers, one major 
clue De la Torre looks for when meeting a 
man is how he treats his mom. 

When he was 7 years old, Ramon lost his 
father and was brought up by his mother. 
Ramon learned the values of responsibility 
from taking care of his three younger broth- 
ers and sister while his 

mother was away work- 

ing a day job. . 

When you come 
down to it. there are 
two overriding factors 
that navigate Ramon's 
ship through the sea of 
relationships. First, he 
says, it depends on the 

individual. He claims 

that if he did anything 
wrong, he wouldn't be 
able to think straight. It would be on his con- 
science. The second factor is family. 

Hal Pruett, psychologist and director of 
Psychological Services for 13 years, is aware 
of nice guys who complain that, "I'm a nice 
guy, I treat women with respect, and it does- 
n't secip to get me anywhere." 

The problem seen by psychologists in 
Student Psychological Services (SPS) most 
often is from the other side of the spectrum: 



"A woman likes a guy 
that gets her attention/ 

DcLaTorra 

First-year economics student 



respectful or responsible. However, Pruett 
notes women are just as likely to date an 
authorative type as they are a passive guy. 

What about the idea of women wanting to 
date macho, more aggressive guys than "nice 
guys?" Pruett believes women don't normal- 
ly want to be with a "bad guy." If they do, it is 
because of problems in the home. 

In abusive homes, patterns are formed 
which the children emulate as adults in their 
own families. 

^^^^^^^^ "Sometimes love and 
^^~'''""'"'''""~ abuse become connect- 
ed, and distorted views 
sometimes get devel- 
oped," Pruett said. 

The choices people 
make in their partners 
are based on models 
when growing up. 
' People learn from par- 

ents, relatives and tele- 
vision. 
Despite what the psychologist or a text- 
book says, the consensus among some is that 
women do not like the "nice guy." Why? 
What is all the fuss over being wined and 
dined, spoiled mercifully, and pampered 
beyond oblivion? De la Torre has the perfect 
answer. 

"A woman likes a guy that gets her atten- 
tion, takes the initiative and makes her feel 
good. 



women complaining of men not being Energetically, she emphasizes two main 



characteristics some women look for in a 
man. People want a challenge, someone who 
will not be an easy catch. The second reason 
comes in a blatanUy cut-throat style about the 
stud: "everybody wants him, so you want to 
get him fu^t." 

Some women don't want a guy that's 
going to be a lap dog to their every whim. 
They want a man who presents a challenge 
and treats them with respect. In addition, 
they think they can change him to be a 
respectable man with high moral standards. 
However, many women find out the hard 
way that it is oftentimes futile. 

In the early 1990s, the Journal Of" 
Personality and Social Psychology reported 
that women were attracted to dominant 
behavior in men. The sexual attraction was 
not linked to likability. Is this saying that 
women prefer a man who is aggressive? 

Amaal Islam, 18, is a freshman majoring 
in neuroscience with two interesting stories 
of extreme contrasts. Her first boyfriend was 
a "nice guy." He did everything for her. 
"Before I would even ask for something, he 
would do it," she said. 

For five months they were together with- 
out any fights or problems. As she put it, it 
got "boring." 

Her second boyfriend was the opposite. 
Unlike the first, who was valedictorian in 
high school, this guy dropped out of high 

- • See NKE GUY, page 8 



Arts & Entertainment: 825-2538; News: 825-2795; Sports.825 9851; Viewpo!nt:825-2216; Classified Line:825-2221, Classified Display: 206 3060' Sales:825 21f)1 



Artist draws cash. Secret Service's attention 



COUNTERFEIT: Creator of 
'Boggs Bills' denied trial; 
1,300 pieces of art seized 



ByStev«iS.Woo 

Cox News Service 

WASHINGTON - Plenty of peo- 
ple draw a paycheck. But artist J S G 
Boggs draws cash - currency so realis- 
tic that he spends it in stores and even 
gets change back. 

That's why the U.S. Secret Service 



has hauled away his artwork, diaries 
and other belongings, including his 
underwear. 

Between 1990 and 1992, the Secret 
Service raided his home three times, 
seizing more than 1,300 pieces of art. 
Each time, U.S. attorneys declined to 
prosecute, but the government still 
hasn't given Boggs his belongings 
back. 

"I've been under investigation 
since 1986, and I would think that they 
would understand that I am an artist 
and not a criminal," Boggs said in an 
interview. 



"I've been under 
investigation since 
1986 ...I am an artist 
and not a criminal." 

J.S.G. Boggs 

Saying the Secret Service has 
seized "rugs, cakes, cookies and 
underwear with images of money on 
them," Boggi said the agents "seem to 



feel it is their province not only to pro- 
tect the country from contraband, but 
against any image of money at all." 

At first glance, the "Boggs Bills" in 
question are uncanny replicas of real 
U.S. currency. Drawn with fin^point 
pens in green and black ink, they are 
the same size and have the same deli- 
cate scrollwork and cross-hatching as 
genuine, engraved bills. 

But on closer examination, subtle 
differences emerge. The reverse side 
of a $10 bill shows not the Treasury 
buikiing, but the Supreme Court. The 
spiked seal on a $100 bill reads 



"Federal Observe Bank of Bohemia." 
And a $1,000 bill is signed by the 
"Secret of the Treasury" - J.S.G. 
Boggs. 

What's more, the bills are inked on 
one side only, and many bear his 
thumbprint as well as his signature. 

A spokesman for the Secret 
Service, Jim Mackin, said of tbe 
Boggs situation, "We enforce laws 
mandated by Congress and will con- 
tinue to do so." 

Under U.S. law, it is illegal to make 



Set 



pages 



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■ ^^3. tf ^4. j ^s. V ""^ A*" .*! ^., I ^l}>'•■!A 






WMnnday.MKuary 18, 1998 



Daily Brum News 



Experts untertain of sunscreen effectiveness 



CANCER: Researchers still vouch for preventive 
product but suggest adjusting habits to block rays 



By OmiM Q. Haney 

The Associated Press 

PHILADELPHIA - A provoca- 
tive presentation at a science confer- 
ence Tuesckiy questioned the widely 
held belief that sunscreens lowir the 
risk of deadly melanoma skin can- 
cer, but specialists still caution 
against going into the sunshine with- 
out these lotions. 

_ Sunscreens prevent sunburns, 
and since there is evidence that fre- 
quent burns, especially at an early 
age, trigger melanoma, many 
experts assume that using them 
should help ward ofTthis cancer. 

However, melanoma cases have 
risen dramatically over the last 25 
years even as sunscreen use became 
more common. The lethal cancer 
now strikes about 42,000 Americans 
a year, killing 7,300. 

Dr. Marianne Berwick, an epi- 
demiologist at "Memorial Sloan- 
Kettering Cancer Center in New 
York City, said her own study, as 
well as a review of other research, 
offers no convincing evidence that 
iteing sunscreens keeps people from 
getting melanoma. '' * 

"It's not safe to rdy on sun- 
screen," she said. 

Ten studies have looked at the 
question, she said at the American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science meeting. Three of them, 
including her own, found no link 
between sunscreens and melanoma 
risk. Two suggested that sunscreens 
seem to prevent melanoma. 



The five others found that 
melanoma risk actually increased 
among sunscreen users - probably 
because (>eople who use them most 
are already at highest risk because of 
light complexions. 

Several dermatologists strongly 
disagreed with Berwick's report. 

Until there is clear proof that sun- 
screens are ineffective, "it would be 
irresponsible to discontinue all rec- 
ommendations about using sun- 
screens," said Dr. Darrell Rigel of 
New York University. 

Dr. Michael Thun, director of 
analytics epidemiology at the 
American Cancer Society, said: 
"People should'not stop using sun- 
screen because of this study," he 
said. "The important message is that 
using sunscreen is only one of sever- 
al measures to reduce one's risk of 
skin cancer." 

Melanoma may take 20 years or 
more to develop after excessive sun 
exposure. Some doctors argue that it 
is simply too soon to prove that sun- 
screens are helping, since No. IS 
and stronger sunscreens have only 
been in wide use since the mid 
1980s. 

Dr. Roger Ccilley of the 
University of Iowa, president of the 
American Academy of 

Dermatology, said most of the peo- 
ple getting melanoma now were 
exposed long before they began 
using sunscreens. 

"I personally think it very likely 
reduces the risk of melanoma," said 
Ceilley. "I use it everyday and rec- 



ommend it to my patients." 

Dr. Jo'uni Uitto of Thomas 
Jefferson University said most skin 
specialists would agree. 

"If you asked 100 dermatologists, 
95 would say sunscreen protects 
against melanoma, and they counsel 
their patients that way," Uitto said. 

Still, these doctors cautioned 
against using sunscreen as an excuse 
to bake in the sun. They said people 
at high risk of melanoma should 
avoid prolonged sun exposure, stay 
out of the midday sun and wear hats 
and long-sleeved shirts. 

Generally, dermatologists agree 
with Berwick's contention that 
genetic susceptibility is the most 
important factor in melanoma. Her 
study, based on 1,200 people in 
Connecticut, found that fair-«kinned 
people who bum easily are about six 
time^ more likely than darker folks 
to get melanoma. And people with 
many moles have about six times the 
risk of people with few of them. 

Among Berwick's points: 

'The belief that bad childhood 
sunburns trigger melanoma may be 
wrong. Studies show that only about 
half^the people questioned repeated- 
ly about blistering childhood burns 
consistently give 0ie same answei^ 

'Many fair-skinned people may 
be using sunscreens so they can stay 
out in the sun longer without getting 
burned. Nevertheless, the excess sun 
exposure, even if it doesn't burn, 
may increase their risk of 
melanoma. 

•Intermittent sun exposure, such 
as the occasional trip to the beach, 
may be more likely to cause 
melanoma than more regular time in 
the sun. 



Universities, private firms 
cash in on faculty research 



INVENTIONS: Critics fear 
schools will shift focus to 
most profitable ventures 



ByJonMarais - — ^— 

The Associated Press 

BOSTON - UniversiUes and col- 
leges in the United States and Canada 
are cashing in on their faculties' inven- 
tions to the tune of more than half a bil- 
lion dollars a year, according to a new 
report. 

The University of California system 
alone made S63.2 million from licenses 
and patents, 




Stanford $43.8 
million and 

Columbia $40.6 
million. 

University 
authorities point 
out that license 
fees and royalties 
from patents rep- 
resent a fraction of 
the $21.4 billion a 

year in research 

conducted by the 

173 universities and colleges surveyed. 

The schools nationvi(ide made $592 
million from licenses and royalties in 
1996, the last year for which the figures 
are available, said the Association of 
University Technology Managers in a 
report to be released on Wednesday. 
This is up from $495 million the year 
before and a 167 percent increase in 
five years. 

This growth comes even as research 
spending by government and private 
industry has slow^ and colleges and 
universities are seeking new ways to 
raise money. 

"Look at it as a hard-earned wind- 
fall," said Marvin Guthrie, the associa- 
tion's president and vice president of 
patents and licensing at Massachusetts 
General Hospital. "You've got 
research, you've got the successful 
transfer of research information to a 
company; the company hires people. 



"There's nothing wrong 

with capitalizing on the 

results of research." 

Jules LaPidus 

Council of Graduate Schools 
president 






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So there is a return all the way down: 
people hold their jobs, the investors 
make money, some of the money goes 
back to the ufiiversity in the form of 
royalties, and everybody benefits." 

But critics worry that closer ties 
between academia and the private sec- 
tor may transform universities into 
industrial laboratories, focused only 
on potentially money-making 
research. 

They worry some schools may soon 
put pressure on their research faculties 
to focus on those areas most likely to 
produce a profit. 

"Money is a pretty strong driver, 
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versity doesn't turn into the develop- 
ment arm (for industry). These figures 
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movement in that direction." 

Collectively, American and 
Canadian colleges and universities 
awarded a record 2,741 licenses to pri- 
vate industry to develop products 
based on their research. 

The schools applied for 3,261 
patents, up 1 1 percent from 1995. 

Royalties and revenue from licenses 
is usually split between the depart- 
ments in which the discoveries were 
made, the university and thtf^nventors. 
Faculty who work with private 
industry are not normally prevented 
from sharing the results of their 
research, though some are required to 
allow their private industry partners to 
review the data first. 



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Daily Brain News 



W«Jn«day,Febnjafy18,1998 



WORLD & NATION 



CNna 




Dow Jones Industrials 

up: 28.40 

dose: 8398.50 •-— -~^ 



Nasdaq Index 

down: 6.99 
dose: 1703.43. 



Yen: 126.42 
Mafk:1i268 



CRASH: Authorities still 
unable to discover cause 
of worst wreck in Taiwan 



ByMMMnilMIQ 

The Associated Press 

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Investigators 
reconstructing the route of China 
Airlines Flight CI 676 focused Tuesday 
on why the jet veered off a seemingly 
routine approach at the last moment, 
crashing and exploding into Rames just 
short of the nmway. 

It was Taiwan's worst plane crash, 
killing 203 people - everyone on 
board, including at least four 
Americans and seven on the ground - 
and destroying a string of homes near 
Taipei's airport Monday. 

Soldiers, police and firefighters 
picked through shoes and engine parts 
Tuesday, looking for remains and per- 
sonal items to help identify the victims. 
Cries of grieving relatives mixed vkith 
Buddhist funeral chants at a blue-and- 
orange tent nearby. "*" 

Most of the dead were tourists 
returning home from the resort island 
of Bali, but Taiwan's respected Central 
Bank governor, his wife and four other 



finance ofHcials also were aboard. 

Dazed by his loss, Chien Ming- 
hsing looked Tuesday for the remains 
of 13 relatives, including his son, 
daughter and his grandchildren. They 
were vacationing together in Bali. 

**! don't know how we'll handle 
things," he said. — 

Although the pfaine cradled in fog 
and light rain, investigators were look- 
ing elsewhere for a cause. Initial infor- 
mation suggested that despite the 
weather, the veteran pilots had been on 
a routine landing until just before the 
accident. 

Flight data records had been recov- 
ered and sent to the United States for 
analysis, airport officials said. 

A recording of cockpit conversa- 
tions with the control tower indicated 
that the pilot of the twiiKngine Airbus 
sought permission to land when the jet 
still was on course. 

He then lost touch and did not 
answer a question about whether he 
would try a second approach. The 
recording offered no information to 
confirm reports from the airline that 
the pilot was trying a second approach 
when the plane crashed. 

Two beeps were then heard on the 

SceOUSItpaQelT 




The AsiocJaced Preis 

Investigators Inspect the wreckage of a China Airlines A-300 jetliner in Taoyuan, near Taipei, Tuesday. 
The A-30G crashed Monday into a residential area while trying to land on a flight from Bali, Indonesia. 



India's voter turnout Ngh despite violence 



ELECTIONS: Government 
officials declare success 
for budding democracy 



i 



Byl 

The Assodated Press 

NEW DELHI, India - Indians 
voted in large numbers despite bomb 
explosions and shootings during parlia- 
mentary elections, prompting govcrn- 
nvnt officials and analysts to declare 
today that the world's largest democra- 
cy is thriving. 

More than 55 percent of registered 
voters turned out Monday to elect 222 
deputies in the first phase of staggered 
voting, similar to turnout figures in pre- 
vious elections. It will take five more 
days of balloting to complete the elec- 
tions for India's 545-seat k>wer house 
of parliament. 

"In the turbulence of a maturing 
dimocracy. the elections are a resound- 
ii% success," said B.C. Verghese, polit- 
icly analyst at the Center for Policy 
Research. 




Highway funding bill tied in 
with affimiative action issues 



CONGRESS: Parties differ 
in opinion over money 
distribution to minorities 



Watched over by soldiers, an election commission worker locks a 
room containing ballot boxes at Patna, India on Tuesday. 

Election-related violence killed 22 



people Monday. Twenty died in east- 
ern Bihar state amid land-mine explo- 
sions and clashes among rival political 



groups. One person died in the north- 
eastern Assam state and another in 



^ 



H9«10 



By 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - At stake are 
billions of federal dollars for high- 
ways and mass transit - spending 
that Congress overwhelmingly sup- 
poTts. Yet the money could become 
entangled in one of the nation's 
touchiest political issues^affirmative 
action. 

One provision of the current huge 
highway program steers at least 10 
percent of the money to firms owned 
by minorities or women. But it faces 
growing opposition in the 
Rcpublican<ontro!led congress. 

While Republicans are not united 
on the issue, the 1996 GOP platform 
put the party on record against racial 
and gender preferences. Adding 



strength to the move was California's 
1996 vote to ban race or gender from 
being a factor in state hiring or col- 
lege admissions. 

The strength of the movement 
against affirmative action will be test- 
ed more than once during the current 
session of Congress. 

Other civil rights issues on the con- 
gressional table this year include 
President Clinton's call for an S86 
million spending increase to enforce 
the country's civil rights laws and his 
naming of Los Angeles attorney Bill 
Lann Lee to the Justice 
Department's top civil rights post. 
Legislation to outlaw job discrimina- 
tion against gays is also pending. 

Rep. Charles Canady, R-Ra., and 
other conservatives, citing more than 
a dozen proposals to end state affir- 
mative action programs, say the pub- 
lic is turning against "a system that 
reinforces prejudice and discrimina- 
tion in our society." 



SeeHmmCpagell 



i 



ORLD & NATION BRIEFS 



Treasury bills fall to 
, lowest in three weeks 

T WASHINGTON - Interest rates on short- 
' term Treasury bills fell in Tuesday's auction to 
the lowest levels in three weeks. 

The Treasury Department auctioned $10.9 
billion in three-month bills at an average dis- 
count rate of 5.075 percent. Another $1 1.3 bil- 
lion in six-month bills was auctioned at an aver- 
age discount rate of 5.070 percent. 

The three-month rate was down from 5.095 

percent last week and was the lowest since 5.070 

percent Jan. 26. The six-month rate was down 

from 5.075 percent test week and was the lowest 

^since 5.025 percent on Jan. 26. 

The new discount rates understate the actual 
return to investors - 5.213 percent for three- 
month bills with a S 10,000 bill selling for 
$9,871.70, or 5.275 percent for a six-month bill 
idltng for $9,743.70. 

In a separate report, the Federal Reserve said 
Monday that the average yield for one-year 



Treasury bills, the most popular 
index for making changes in 
adjustable rate mortgages, rose to 5.28 
percent last week from 5.26 percent the 
previous week. 



Ruling seen as setback 
for gay rights in Europe 

BRUSSELS, Belgium - Gay righto activists 
were shattered by a European Union (EU) high 
couri ruling today against a British lesbian rail- 
road clerk who sought travel benefits for her 
girlfriend. 

It had been considered a test case on work- 
place equality for homosexuals across Europe. 

"We're gutted. It's unbelievable that in this 
day and age, we have a judgment that means that 
lesbians and gays effectively have no rights in the 
wdrkplace," said Anya Palmer of the British gay 
righto group Stonewall. 

The European Court of Justice in 
Luxembourg said Britain's South West Trains 




did not violate EU law v^en it said 

the girlfriend of booking derk Lisa 

Grant was ineligible for travel benefits 

available to the partners of heterosexual 

employees. 

Lawyers for the couple, including Cherie 
Booth, wife of British Prime Minister Tony 
Blair, argued the policy violated the EU's treaty, 
which guarantees "equal pay for equal work 
without discrimination based on sex." 

The rail company argued that the clause did 
not cover sexual orientation. South West Trains 
also denied free travel benefito to partners of 
male homosexuals. 

Jill Pcrcey, Grant's partner, said they and 
their supporters would campaign to have laws 
changed in Britain to outlaw discrimination 
based on sexual orientation. Blair's government 
is committed to reforms ending discrimination 
against gay workers. 

The EU's executive agency said it was consid- 
ering changes to ito law to "phig the gaps" in anti- 
discrimination clauses. Any new proposals 
woukl need backing from the 15 EU nations. 



"W 



Roma woman drowned 
in skinhead attack ^ 



PRAGUE, Czech Republic - Police pulled 
the body of a young Gypsy woman from the 
Elbe River on Tuesday, two days after three 
skinheads allegedy pushed her from a bridge. 

It was the third attack in four weeks on gyp- 
sies - who prefer to be known as Roma - in the 
Czech Republic. 

Police spokesman Karel Matula said the 26- 
year-old woman apparently was attacked short- 
ly before midnight Sunday on a bridge in the east 
Bohemian town of Vrchlabi, 75 miles northeast 
of Prague. 

Firefighters had to rescue another woman 
who jumped in the river to try to help retrieve 
the victim. The victim's body was finaOy recov- 
ered Tuesday. 

Three suspects, ages 23-24, were detained 
Monday and remain in custody. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin wire reports. 



•*t*| 









6 VIMn«day,FfbnHry18,1998 



ull)f BlWI News 



STATE & LOCAL 



Badge misuse puts 




into question 



AUTHORITY: Top officials' 
abuse of power prompts 
limits, ban on decal issue 

The Associated Press 



The practice of issuing police-style 
badges to public officials is drawing 
fire from critics who call it an invita- 
tion to abuse. 

Citizens of suburban West Covina 
were outraged last month when they 
learned Mayor Ben Wong had flashed 
his city-issued government badge and 
confiscated a motorist's driver's 
license aAer a fender-bender tf'afTic 
accident in 1996. 

"It wasn't the brightest thing to 
do," Wong admitted. 

In Los Angeles, the City Council 
was expected to vote this week on a 
recommendation to limit its badge 
policy in the wake of a 19% scandal 
involving Building and Safety 
Commission President Scott Z. Adier. 



Adier resigned and later pleaded no 
contest to charges of soliciting a pros- 
titute after allegedly usinj^ his badge to 
intimidate her. 

Such abuses, while considered rare, 
have prompted some experts to ques- 
tion the wisdom of issuing the shield- 
shaped metal badges to public officials 
with few, if any, law enforcement 
duties. 

"They are often used to get away 
with benefits, whether to intirhidate 
somebody or get special favors," said 
Michael Josephson, president of the 
Josephson Institute of Ethics of 
Marina del Rey. 

In Los Angdes, a report found that 
1,720 city bad|K were in the hands of 
non-sworn employees and officials in 
19%, ranging from building iii^)ec- 
tors to firefighters. Of those, about 90 
badges - mostly issued to nnembers ef 
various commissions - were not sanc- 
tioned by the Oty Council . 

Supporters say the badges are a use- 
ful way of quickly establishing author- 
ity. 



"Police commissioners and fire 
commissioners on occasion go in the 
field and need to identify themselves," 
said GifTord Weiss, acting executive 
director of the civilian Los Angeles 
Police Commission. 

Critics feel otherwise. 

"They are a door to trouble." said 
Hubert Williams of the Washington- 
based Police Foundation. "It creates a 
perceived protection from the law." 

Los Angeles County overhauled its 
badge-issuing policy in 1980 after find- 
ing that "Hillside Strangler" serial 
killer Kenneth Bianchi had been given 
a county seal decal by a supervisor's 
dq)uty chief . He later used it in his car 
to pose as a police officer when luring 
his victims. 

The Board of Supervisors passed a 
motion to ban the decals and to severe- 
ly limit the number of official badges - 
although the supervisors excluded 
tfieraselves from tlK ban. 

In response to the accusations 
against Adier, City Coundlnuin John 
Ferraro has introduced a motion call- 




' Daily Bniin News 



Wednesday, February 1 8 J998 7 




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A West Covina, Calif, council member badge is a city-issued privilege 
for elected officials. 



ing for Umits on thebadges issued, and 
a council committee last week 
approved reconimendations for the 
drafting of ordinances that would 
require a streamlined badge-issuing 



and review process. 

Some police officials say Umiting 
badges is a good idea. 

"Badges belong to cops," said 
Giendora Police Chid^Paul Butler. 





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Wednesday, February 18, 1998 



DaHy Bruin N«ws 



New privacy act targets celebrity chasers 



By Jennifer Bowles 

The Associated Press 



Paparazzi who chase celebrities 
and make them fear injury would be 
committing a federal crime under a 
law proposed Tuesday. The law was 
immediately condemned by civil 
rights activists, who labeled it uncon- 
stitutional. 

U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D- 
Calif. and colleague Orrin Hatch, a 
Utah Republican who is chairman of 
the Senate Judiciary Coinmittee, 
said they plan this. month to intro- 
duce a bill outlawing some tactics 
used by photographers if the photos 
are intended for sale. 

The so-called Personal Privacy 
Protection Act specifically would 
bar "persistently following or chas- 
ing a person in a manner that cause; 
them to have a reasonable fear of 
bodily injury." 

Violators would face up to a year 
in federal prison, at least five years if 
bodily harm actually results and at 
least 20 years if a death occurs. 

The bill, which follows much-criti- 
cized chases of Princess Diana and 
actor Arnold Schwarzenegger, isn't 
limited to celebrities. However, it is 
aimed at ensuring their safety by 
curbing "abuses, threatening behav- 



ior by some who do not respect 
where the line is between what is 
public and what is private," 
Feinstein said at a news conference 
at the-Screen Actors Guild. 

"Just because a person makes 
their living on television or in some 
other public arena should not mean 
they forfeit all rights to personal pri- 
vacy," she said in an earlier state- 
ment. 

The Hollywood community 
applauded the idea. 

"Civili(y is really hard to legislate. 
So until then, this bill represents a 
huge step forward,** said Paul Reiser, 
co-star of TV's "Mad About You." 

SAG President Richard Masur 
said many celebrities had expressed 
their support of the act, including 
Antonio Banderas, Tom Cruise, 
Whoopi Goldberg, Goldie Hawn, 
Billy Crystal, Tom Hanks and 
Brooke Shields. 

Critics, however, said the pro- 
posed bill violates photographers' 
First Amendment rights and is 
redundant since there already are 
laws against trespassing, stalking 
and reckless driving. 

"This is just grandstanding, it's 
absolutely unnecessary" said 
Ramona Ripston, executive director 
of the American Civil Liberties 



Union of Southern California. 
"People who overstep the bounds 
are already prosecuted under state 
laws." ^ 

For instance, two photographers 
were convicted earlier this month of 
misdemeanor false imprisonment 
for using their car to box in 
Schwarzenegger's Mercedes-Benz in 
an effort to videotape him and wife, 
Maria Shriver, outside their son's 
pre-school last May. The photogra- 
phers, who are scheduled to be sen- 
tenced Monday, were hoping to get 
the first pictures of Schwarzenegger 
after he underwent heart valve 
surgery. ^ 

Perhaps the most controversial 
incident involving paparazzi 
occurred in August when Princess 
Diana, her boyfriend Dodi Al Fayed 
and their driver were killed in a Paris 
crash While being chased by photog- 
raphers. 

It turned out the driver of Diana's 
car was drunk and driving at exces- 
sive speeds. 

While the media's role is unclear 
in Diana's death, "the mere fact that 
people recognized that she had been 
harassed by an overly aggressive 
media demonstrates the seriousness 
of the problem," Hatch said at the 
new conference. 



NIQGUY 



From page 3 

school. She did everything for him. 
After nearly a year of putting up 
with his possessive nature and ques- 
tions of who she was with and where 
she was going, she left him. 
Today, Amaal is wary of who she 
-dates. She would like to meet some- 
one with both attributes. She wants 
someone who will argue with her. 
She strongly believes arguing is a 
strong indication that someone 
cares about you. 

She told a story of her roommate. 
She noticed her roommate com- 
plaining about a lab partner: "Oh. 
my God, I hate him. He's so bad." A 
quarter later, she speaks of her for- 
mer lab partner in pleasant terms. 



Amaal sees them arguing constantly^ 
and her roommate really likes him. 

As reported earlier in the Journal 
of Personality and Social 
Psychology, a study was conducted 
to test the effects of dominance on 
women. Seventy-four male and 
female students from an upper divi- 
sion psychology course participated 
in the study. 

In the test for dating desirability, 
it was shown that "female attraction 
was an interactive function of male 
dominance and agreeableness." 

It seems as though many women 
want a man that takes initiative and 
is aggressive, but not domineering. 
They want someone who is confi- 
dent and carries himself in a digni- 
fied and respectful manner. At the 
same time, they wouldn't mind a 
gentleman. 




The 

Career Center 

Is Pleased 

Td Present 

Career Month 

'9B 



THIS WEEK'S EVENTS 



Check our website at www.saonet.ucla.edu/career for a 

month-long agenda of programs to assist with your career exploration, 

decision-making and job search needs. 



It's a marathon of special events to get 
your career off to a great beginning! . 

Whether you're a freshman or a 
senior, you'll fmd plenty of tips and 
techniques to get you on the road 
to a rewarding career destination. 
Get information on how to: 

• Choose Your Major 

• Explore Your Career Options 

• Build a Career Action Plan 

• Make Valuable Contacts ^, . 

• Find the Best Internships 

• Land a Full-time Job 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17 



CAREER PREPARATION WORKSHOPS 
10 am - 3 pm Ackerman 2408, 

2410, 2412 and 3508 

Choosing a Major, Internships, Graduate 
School, Careers in Business, Careers in 
Education, and more! Sponsored by College 
of Letters and Science. 

ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE 

CAREER OPTIONS 

12 - 1 pm Career Center 



INTERVIEWS WITH A BRUIN 

7 - 9 pm James West Alumni Center 

Mock interviews with alumni professionals. 
Register at the iamcs West Alumni Center or 
contact the SAA Career Network Office at 
X66062. 



Thursday, February 19 



Wednesday, February 1 8 



Appreciation 

A special 'thank you' to these campus 
departoKHts arKl orgariizations for their 
significant contributions to Career Month '98: 

College of Letters and Science 
Office of Residential Life ' ■- 

Office for Students with Disabilities 
UCLA Alumni Association 



CAREER PREPARATION WORKSHOPS 
10 am - 3 pm Ackerman 2408, 

2410. 2412 and 3508 

Choosing a Major, Internships, Graduate 
School, Careers in Business. Careers in 
Education, and more! Sponsored by College 
of Letters and Science. 

CAREER OPTIONS FOR LIBERAL ARTS 
1-2pfn 1230 Campbell 



MAJOR BLAST 
5-7p«n 



CAREER MONTH 

• Presented by 




Grand Horizon Ballroom 
Covd Commons 



More than 40 departmental advisors and college 
counsdofs will be available to assist you in 
choosing a major. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL: IS IT RIGHT FOR ME? 
5 - 6 pm Career Center 



CAREER PREPARATION WORKSHOPS 
10 am - 3 pm Ackerman 2408, 

2410, 2412 and 3508 

Choosing a Major, Internships, Graduate 
School. Careers in Business, Careers in 
Education, and morel Sponsored by College 
of Letters and Science. 

' '1 

PERSONAL STORIES: 
DtSCLOSINO YDUR DtSABILlTr 
5 - 630 pm Career Center 

A panel of UCLA Alumni win discuss disdosure 
issues in the workplace. Sponsoied by Office for 
Students with Disabilities. 

lyiONEY TALKS: 

SALARY NEGOTIATION AND BENEFITS 
7 - 9 pm D301 Cornell Hall, 

The Anderson School 

Leam how to increase your compensation pack- 
age and make great investments for the firture. 



Saturday, February 21 



ASIAN PAOFIC ALUMNI 

CAREER NETWORKING CONFERENCE 

9 am - 2 pm Ackerman Ballroom 

Special events for pre-registered participants. 



/ ' 




118 Kerckhoff Hall 



Al-Talib 

UCLA's Muslim Student 
Newsmagazine 




UCLA's Feminist Student 
Newsmagazine 



Ha'Am 

UCLA's Jewish Student 
Newsmagazine 



La Gente 

UCLA's Chicana/o & Latina/o 
Student Newsmagazine 




UCLA's African Studem 
Newsmagazine 



Pacific ties 



UCU's Asian/Pacific 
Studem Newsmagazkie 



Ten Percent 

UCLA'^ Queer Student 
Nm^smagazjne 



Over 30 years 
off alternative 
media at UCUl 



■—» ir^« ^Jt 



Daily Bnim News 



Wednesday, Febnury 18,1998 



BOGGS 




From page 3 

iUustrations in the "likeness and similir 
tude" of U.S. currency unless the illus- 
trations are larger or smaller than real 
bills or are rendered in black and white. 

Boggs said he created his first bill in 
a Chicago resUiurant in 1984. The wait- 
ress mistook a drawing for a genuine $ 1 
bill, and even afkr realizing her mistake 
accepted the bill as payment for a cof- 
fee and doughnut and gave him change, 
he said. 

Since then, he has spent tens of thou- 
sands of "Boggs Bills" all over the 
world, 

Boggs, 43, considers himself a per- 
formance artist. Getting people to take 
his art in place of money is the point of 
his performance, he said . 

He says he never tries to deceive peo- 
ple that his bills are genuine and com- 
plains that the government has not 
piken proper procedures in dealing 
with his case. 

He has sued the government to pro- 
Wt his First Amendment rights to 
4fa°aw his bills and to have his posses- 
sions returned, but his suit was dis- 
missed last year by U.S. District Judge 
'•Royce C. Lamberth in Washington. 
^ "I've been found guilty of a crime 
without the benefit of a jury trial," 
,,Boggs said. "In the last instance, we 
ftsked to present the case to the judge 



himself, and he wouldn't hear it." 
He said the judge compared his 

work to "drugs and child pomogra- 

phy." 

"He did not wrap his mind around 



"(Thejudge)saidif It 

looks like money It Is 

counterfeit. Well, 

Monopoly money 

looks like money." 

■ . J.S.G.Bo^gs 



the issues. He said if it loojcs like money 
it is counterfeit. Well, Monopoly 
money looks like money. Let's get a grip 
here,'.' Boggs said. 

"He seems to think that anybody at 
all can see that my work is counterfeit, 
and I have only one question; if you are 
so confident that anyone can see that it 
is counterfeit, why is he denying me the 
jury trail that I deserve?" Boggs said. 

Boggs' attorney, Kent Yalowitz of 
New York, agrees that "counterfeiting 
is a serious crime of fraud and cheating 
people, but to put Boggs in that catego- 
ry to begin with is inappropriate." 

"He is not a defrauder; he has never 



defrauded anyone," Yalowitz said. "His 
goal is to elucidate and educate, not to 
deceive. And to put him in that catego- 
ry without a cros»4ection of the com- 
munity deciding for themselves is 
morally outrageous." 

Boggs is appealing the judge's deci- 
sion not to give him his possessions 
back. 

In the meantime, he continues to 
spend his bills. Just a few weeks ago in 
Manhattan, he said, he bought a six- 
pack of Rolling Rock beer with a $10 
Boggs Bill and the clerk gave him $2.50 
in change. 

For his art, Boggs has endured years 
of trouble. 

In 1986, he was arrested in England 
for counterfeiting but was acquitted 
after a five-day jury trial. One of the 
drawings of English currency at the cen- 
ter of that case is now in the British 
Museum, he said. 

In 1989, he was arrested in Sydney, 
Australia. He said the judge threw out 
the case and gave him $20,000 for a 
wrongful arrest. 

In 1990, he was the target of a raid in 
Tanq>a. After the U.S. attorney there 
dechned to prosecute, Boggs thought 
his problems with the law were over and 
"was thrilled to get them ofTmy back." 

But then 12 Secret Service agents 
raided his apartment in Cheyenne, 
Wyoming, and seized the 1,300 items 
that he's still trying to recover. 

Boggs studied art at Columbia 



University in New York in 1979 and 
wa« a fellow in art and ethics at 
Carnegie Mellon University in 
Pittsburgh from 1991 to 1993. 
However, he has never earned an acad- 
emic degree. 

Currently, Boggs is a research associ- 
ate with the Center for the 
Advancement of Applied Ethics at 
Carnegie Mellon University, splitting 
his time between Tampa and New 
York. ,.,_.„ ,,,-., ,^ 



"He's'right up front with 

anyone he presents 
notes to as payment ... 
He's letting them know 
that it is art." — 

Craig Wliitford 

Rare coin dealer 



Boggs said he lectures, but he mainly 
performs. In his latest performance 
piece, called "Work Not Work," he 
moves a huge mound of dirt from one 
side of the stage to the other. 

"During the process, I find various 
objects in the dirt and make comments. 
There's everything from an infant to a 



gun, drugs - you never know what is in 
that pile of dirt," he said. 

He says the performance addresses 
the issues of what is work and what is 
not work, and how people make ethical 
judgments. 

He performs at museums and uni- 
versities around the country. His next 
performance is in Chicago in May. 

Boggs said his main goal is eventual- 
ly get his belongings back. His legal bills 
have skyrocketed to more than 
$800,000, he said, and "all indications 
are that the government has spent two 
to two and a half million dollars chasing 
me around, and I feel it is an unforgiv- 
able waste of money." 

One of Boggs' defenders is Craig 
Whitford, owner of a rare coin auction" 
company in Lansing, Mich., who said 
he has known Boggs for years and 
recently sold a $500 Boggs Bill for 
$5,000 to the Tampa Museum of Art. 

"He's right up front with anyone he» 
presents notes to as payment," 
Whitford said. "He's letting them know 
that it is art and that what he has done is 
part of a limited edition. He then just 
asks for the receipt and change. His art 
is about how people interrelate with 
each other and with money and ideas." 

Whitford ridiculed the government 
seizure of some of Boggs' belongings. 

"To take a man's boxer shorts ... " he 
snorted. "I'm sure if a person went into 
a bank to deposit some boxer shorts, 
don't you think they'd look twice?" 



A^ 




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WOMEN'S BESOVRCE CENTER 

^^Vnm____1998_FMGRAMS 

Ixfntt YMra liff A> AMarthraMss Cllaie far WfoiMa: UMm to .Mrt youneir and state 



your tdMS with confktenc*. A tvi o ■ w it o n cUnic that addrassM isauM afTacting wramwi's communication style 
and oIImv aprnMc techniques for building aasartiveness skiUs. ftcilitalad by Lisa Rwikel, Hh.O., M.F.C.C 

Wednesdays, February 1 8 and 25 1 2:00 - 1 :30 pm Call 206-8240 to Sign-up 

GftflMICi IR tha CllSf rMMI Laam how' to «paak aflactiVBiy. aasartivalv and confidently in dan. 
Diaoovar how profesaon would Uka to kniaract with studaMs la llw daawBaoa aaMng and how this couM 
improve your academic succaas. facilttatad by Emily Cattir. ChaaoiMry 1 
Chemistry Profanor Speaaond by te Catalysi 

Wednesday, February 18 



I WUliam Gelbart 



3:00 - 4:30 pm 



2 Dodd Hall 



WUt 4ttl a Rtttirdi Seitatift Da aaj Why? OlaooMr what nmmth antalls discuss how 
topics are chosen, the process of generating questions and the davalopmant of raia a rch methodology. In 
addWon. leam about the many rewards of scientific re s ea r c h , iteilitated by Audrey Cramer, L&S Science 
Rssaar ch Counselor Spaaaand by te Catalyst MoMoiriHp Pratnn 

Thursday, February 19 4:00- 5:30 pp . 2 Dodd Hall 

Wednesday, February 25 6:00 -7:30 pm x 

Wia^airt af Offartiaity, Caraars far Mawaa: Nm 4 ^m Mb Am u^fM ia^»n»n\k$fi 

Undaratand the caraar dadtkin making process and begin to devaiop your 0¥im career criteria. Several 
nontraditional and growing fMds wiU be highlighted. FhciUtatad by Jennifer Brydges. Career Counselor. 
Caraar Cantar. Caspiiwi i< by ifce UCLA CwswCtii. 

TlRirsday. Febniacy 26 4:00 •5:30 pm 2 Dodd Hall 

Sail PafaaM far WaiMai Empower yourself with realistic. hands on self-defense Uaining. This 
amrkMof) offers lunowladge of simple & effective techniques that may help you dissua<it!. escape or fend ofT an 
AttadDMl Ikught by Cartlftad instructors, firom the Los Angelas Commission on Assaultt Against Women. 
I by *s UCLA Kips Pievcatiaa Mrf Edwatioe Scrvicai Md *i UC PoUoa Dept 

Call 206-8240 to Sign-up 



12:30- 4:30 pm 



Saturday, March 1 

IRtaraatiaaal Wanaa t Vay« Plaase join us in celebrating women's concerns, issues and 
acxxNTipUshments. Prograwis will be ed\icational and entertaining. R>r more information pieaaa contact the 



Da ah aw Intamaftlaoal Student Center at 310-267-1981 or the Women's Raaource Center at 310-a25-3945. 
SpaaMNd by Ihs UCLA Dsikew taftaaatiaad SladM CeatH. CMsr for te Saidy of WooM^ Wboiea's RMoaMS CHta. 

Thursday. March 5 4:00 - 8:00 pm KcrckhofT Grand Salon 

Qvitr Mitten: EMtrfla) Istias la Saxial Oriaatitlaa Lav: a symposium to pft>vide 

Students with the ofiportunity to leem about and discuss currsnt Inuas in saxual orientation law. The 
syinpoakaB wUl Includa topics such aa: tranagender relationships, sama-sax marriage rights, same-sex sexual 
har a ss m s n t. saxual orientation bias in the legal profaasiun. and amployment baneHts for same-sax partners, 
finalists wUI Include prefs as or s . practitionars and community activists, ftiiisiii by: the UCLA WaaMa's Law 
JearaaL SpgasowladadrftMrfcr ^ iJiilfwr M— l Bi. UCLA ScboelofLawLBOA. UCLA School of UwStudeat Bar 
AModBliaa, Law flna of ksM A MmsI^ LLf Md aw UCLA 



Saturday, March 7 



9:30 am -5:00 pm 



UCLA School of Uw _ — ^.- 



ClatvaSliaa PirajaCt: a visual display that bears wrttness to Uie vioianoa against women During the • 

public display, a clothesline is hung with decorated shins r epresenting a woman's survivorship. Survivors are ■ 

enoouragad to create a t-shlrt to break the ailenca. Significant othert are also welcome to civala a t-ahirt in ^ 
mamory of or on behalf of someone In UialrllfB who has axparianoad such violence. The first oi^anisational 

maatlng %vUI meat on March 3, 1908at the Women's Raaource Canter (2 Oodd Hall). If you are interastad In ■ 

being invohrad with this pn>iact plaase contact Robin McDonald @ the WRC 206^91 5 _ 

WRC facMtlM «t« acce—Me to atudant* ¥M\ diMMItl«a, fior mora information pteaM ctA 025-3945 or ■ 

TPD73&-2929. WRC la «dMaion of StodantDwvlopmant and Health. g 

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10 Wednesday, February 18, 1998 



Daily Kruin News 




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UCLflsTOflE 



CHERMAYEFF 

From page 1 ^ 

pie. (We) are solving other people's 
communication problems. Therefore, 
it is becoming of us to know some- 
thing about other things that go on in 
the world," he added. 

In addition to working with stu- 
dents on campus, ChermayefT will be 
giving a public lecture and walk- 
through of an exhibition in mid- 
March featuring his recent mural pro- 
ject of over 1,000 square meters, 
"Tiles of the Oceans." 

He blended the classic Portuguese 
tile with the computerized process of 
digital imaging to produce the gigan- 
tic tile wall at the Lisbon Aquarium. 

The 55,000 tiles were individually 
hand-painted, each representing an 
abstract design that bears no distinct 
relation to the overall subject of the 
oceans of the world. 

"If you step back, it's a photo- 
graph (of ocean creatures). If you are 



up against it, it's a wild abstraction or 
blue and white," (Thermaycff said. 

The Lisbon Aquarium was recent- 
ly constructed as part of EXPO '98 
and is the lacgest in Europe. 
ChermayefT, who studied at Harvard 
University, the Institute of Design in 
Chicago, and graduated from Yale 
University, School of Arts and 
Architecture, owns a firm in New 
York that has created a number of 
logos for large enterprises that are 
now much like household images in 
America. 

His exhibition and graphic designs 
have won awards from numerous 
places including the American 
Institute of Graphic Arts, the Type 
Director's club, and the Society of 
Illustrators. In addition, he received 
honorary doctorates in fme arts from 
the Corcoran Gallery of Art 
(Washington, D.C.) and the 
University of the Arts (Philadelphia). 

In the future he will be working on 
projects at the Smithsonian muse- 
ums. 



INDIA 



From page 5 

southern Andhra Pradesh. 

At least four boys were killed by a 
bomb blast today in the southern town 
of Coimbatore. police said. The boys 
were playing cricket in a neighborhood 
park dominated by Muslims when they 
opened a bag containing the explosive. 
Explosions in the same town killed 54 
people Saturday. 

In the northern state of Punjab, 20 
political activists were injured today in 
fighting between armed members of 
the governing local Akali Dal Party 
and the influential Congress Party. 

The voting went ahead in as many as 
a quarter million polling stations. 
Polling will have to be scheduled again 
in sevecal hundred districts because of 
violence or other problems. More than 
600 miUion Indians were registered to 
vote in the sta^ggered ballot, choosing 
from among some 5,000 candidates 
from more than 100 political parties. 

In the remote northeastern Tripura 
state, where an ongoing insurgency 
and decades of ethnic conflict has 
claimed hundteds of lives, turnout was 
85 percent, officials said. In Assam - 
where a banned separatist group. 
United Liberation Force of Assam, 
threatened violence if voters ventured 



out - turnout was 43 percent. 

"People defied the boycott call," 
said Assam Chief Minister Prafulla 
Kumar Mahanta. 

Violence did have an impact. In 
1996, about 69 percent of the dec- 
torate voted in Assam. In Tamil Nadu, 
where a series of bomb blasts Saturday 
killed 54 people and injured nearly 200, 
only 45 percent of the electorate voted 
Monday. 

Bhaskar Rao at the Center for 
Media Studies said turnout was also 
affected by apathy from voters who 
bdieve the elections will only result in 
another deadlocked parliament. 

Elections were called three years 
early aAer 1996 voting resulted in no 
party winning a majority in parliament. 
Politicians tried and failed to form an 
enduring minority or coalition govern- 
ment. 

The Congress Party, which has gov- 
erned India for all but five years since 
independence, has been battered by 
accusations that it is corrupt and out of 
'^Touch. The Hindu nationalist 
Bharatiya Janata Party is expected to 
win the most seats in these idections, 
but not the majority needed to govern 
alone. 




bcieiyisi uo ana wii 



^ 



For more informat 
The Women's Ref 
(310)82f 



UM)f BfUnl MIWS 



VHMMsday, February 18, t9n 11 



CRASH 



FfompageS 

tape. Chang Kuo<:heng, Taiwan's 
dqputy director of civil aeronautics, 
said they could have been from the 
plane's warning system. 

Chang said the plane touched 
ground off the runway, hit a utiHty pole 
and a highway median about 200 feet 
from the runway. It then skidded into 
several houses, surrounded by fish 
farms, rice paddies, factories and ware- 
houses, and exploded. 

A resident near the airport tdd a 
radio station that he saw the jetlmer 
apparently preparing to land, 'is if the 
pilot mistook the spacious highway for 
the runway." 

The impact and blast left few pieces 
of the plane still recognizable - parts of 
a tail aiKl a wing on one side of the 
road, and three large pieces of fuselage 
on the other. 

In Washington, the State 
Department confirmed that the vic- 
tims included four Americans. Susan 
Stahl, spokeswoman for the American 
Institute in Taiwan, the U.S. office on 
the island, said there might have been 
up to six U.S. citizens on the plane, but 
would not provide details until their 
identities were verified. 

However, the identities of two of the 



Americans were released by their 
employers - Kenneth Cowan, a 35- 
year-old associate producer at 
WGBH-TV in Boston and Chris 
Corey, 28, a fitness trainer who worked 
in Benton. 

Cowan had been in Bali scouting 
locations for the upcoming season of 
the "The Victory Garden." 

Sheu, the bank chief, had been cred- 
ited with helping keep Taiwan safe 
from the economic chaos gripping 
much of Asia. 

Taiwan's Civil Aeronautics 
Administration ordered China 
Airlines, the country's flagship carrier, 
to ground its nine remaining Airbus 
300 jets of the type that crashed. 

Airiine spokesman Hamilton Liu 
said flights would be canceled or con- 
solidated until the planes pass strict 
inspections. 

China Airlines was plagued for 
years with a reputation for poor ser- 
vice and a shoddy safety record but 
had largely kept a clean record since it 
launched a campaign to retrain pilots 
and retool its image after a 1994 crash 
in Japan that killed 264. 

While the airline will have to pay 
compen^on to family members of 
victims of Monday's crash, analysts 
say its real losses will come in shattered 
consumer confidence and nose-diving 
ticket sales. 




HIRING 



From page 5 

"The politicians in Washington still 
have not gotten the message from the 
American people that it's time for us to 
put an end to the divisive policy of pref- 
erences," Canady said. 

Rep. Maxine Waters, the 
Congressional Black Caucus chair, 
said the failure of Canady 's bill to clear 
the House Judiciary Committee on 
two previous occasions shows 
Republicans are struggling with the 
issue. 

"1 would not like to have to fight 
them but, should (Republicans) con- 
tinue, I think we are going to win," 
Waters, DCahf., said in an interview. 

The first vote on the issue is likely to 
come in March or April on a proposal 
by Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to 
kill the highway program's set-aside 
provision. 

Last year, lawmakers extended the 
previous highway and mass transit 
funding bill until May 1 because they 



couldn't agree on how to distribute the 
money in new legislation. 

McConnell said the "disadvantaged 
business enterprise" program is costly, 
divisjye and unconstitutional. Instead, 
he wants states receiving federal trans- 
portatitm dollars to provide technical 
and other support to help 'Emerging 
small businesses" compete for trans- 
portation contracts. "TTiis is one vote 
we will definitely have," he said in an 
interview. 

Canady's bill failed last year due to 
objections from Rep! George Gekas, 
R-Pa., an aifumauve action opponent 
who doubted Congress should try to 
end the programs when the courts 
increasingly are already doing so. 

To satisfy critics who said Canady's 
original bill oflered no suitable alterna- 
tive, the lawmaker plans to introduce a 
new version requiring federal depart- 
ments and agencies to make recruit- 
ment and outreach efforts. 



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ot the 



Dr. David Hartman 

Director of the Shalom Hartman Institute, Jerusalem; Lecturer, Jewish 

Philosophy, Hebrew University; Author, Uving Covenant: The Innovativt 

Spirit in Traduional Judaism; Maimonides: Torah and the Philosophical 

Quest; and Conflicting Visions: Spiritual PossibiUties of Modern Israel. 

Wf»NESDy%Y9 FfSRUARV 18 

Stute of the Jlpm or iemxk Stote? 



Student Respondent: Eugene Sheppard, Ph.D candidate in Jewish History at UCLA. 

Moderator: Herb Glaser, member of the Board of GoTenwrs of the Jewish Agency for 

larael and Lo« Angles Chairman of the Lee Angeles-Tel Aviv Partnerdnp 2000. 

$10 pre-pay or $12 at the door. 

Free to fnll-tiioe students with current student ID. 
Prograai wUI begla at 7:3» P.1H. 



For more information please call Hillel at (310) 208-308T ~^ 

or e-mail us at hillel@ucla.edu 

AU events will be held .t UCLA Hillel at 900 Hil«.rd .venue, first floor (corner of Le Come .nd Hilgard) in 

Westwood^ P.rkm« U .y.iUble for • flat r.le .t Macy's Westwood. Enter the parking f.cUity from Le Conte 

between Westwood BKd. mi»d Tiverton. Hillel U a .ember of the University Religious Conference Hillel is a 

constituent agency of the Jewish Federation Council of Greater Los Angeles 




The Education Department is pleased - 
to announce a reception for those interested 
in the Minor in Education Studies. 



V- 



* Wednesday, February 18 
7:00 to 9:00 Charles Young Qrand Salon 

KcrckhoffHall 

• • . 

This will be an opportunity for 
undergraduates interested in educational 

issues, professors, administrators, and 

graduate students within QSE&JS to meet 

one another, engage in great conversation, 

and have some refreshments. 



We hope to see you there!! 



*^> 






< • • < ♦ « 1 t ♦ I f « ^ ♦ 

i<<<lf44ii 

' ' * f 1 I < 



12 «Mn«(iay,Miruary1S,1998 



DiRy Bniin ViMpoNit 



r 



VI EWPOINT 



viewpotnt@ilwdia.uda.edu 



EDITORIAL 



^^dents deserve cx>llege town nightlife 



WESTWOOD: Dancing permit a ridiculous demand 
to impose on city's businesses, younger taxpayers 



Recently, a heinous crime was 
committed in West^ood. It 
was so serious that the West 
Los Angeles Vice Squad had to step 
in. It wasn't a shooting or robbery. It 
was worse. 

People were caught dancing. 
Every Friday or Saturday night, 
UCLA students look Tor some place 
to have fun. Many do not own cars, 
so their evenings are often limited to 
Westwood. Unfortunately, students 
have very little to do - one reason is 
that dancing is not allowed without a 
conditional use permit, which is very 
difficult to attain. The culprit: the 
Westwood Specific Plan. 

The document sets the rules and 
regulations for commercial growth in 



Westwood. The current plan caps the 
number of movie seats and sets the 
height limits for new buildings at 
three stories. Los Angeles requires 
that all businesses which operate 
dance halls obtain a dance hall per- 
mit from the L.A. Police 
Commission. In Westwood, opera- 
tors are also required to be approved 
for a conditional use permit for danc- 
ing. The plan allows "night clubs or 
other establishments offering danc- 
ing and live entertainment in con- 
junction with a restaurant, provided 
a conditional use permit is granted " 
However, obtaining this permit is 
very difficuit. 

Back in the late '80s, Westwood 
was a lively and exciting town. The 



atmosphere of dancing, night clubs, 
music and droves of students reflect- 
ed Westwood for what it was - a col- 
lege town. Increasing crime, riots and 
the shooting death of Karen Toshima 
in 1988 in Westwood led some con- 
cerned residents to take action. 

The Westwood Specific Plan was 
updated in a response to the rising 
violence and gang activity. After the 
smoke cleared and the yellow tape 
was removed, Westwood reappeared 
- void of all life. Years later, 
Westwood is feeling the limiting 
effects of the policies: There's very lit- 
tle for students to do beyond eating, 
shopping and watching movies. 

The village desperately need«.to be 
revitalized, and strict regulations and 
obstacles do nothing but further 
drain hfe from the ailing town. 
Westwood has been home to tens of 
thousands of college students since 



the inception of UCLA in the late 
1920s. Those residents who object to 
the loud, rowdy^ctivity associated 
with college students should have 
thought twice about moving next to a 
university of over 35,000 students. 
Westwood is our home too, and we 
deserve a decent nightlife in the city. 

The plan only serves to frustrate 
bored college students and hinder 
Westwood businesses' chance to sur- 
vive. Residents are taxpayers, but stih 
dents also pay taxes in addition to 
tuition. We should not have to suffer 
because of the conservative hostility 
from Westwood residents, and busi- 
nesses should not be limited by silly 
regulations that accomplish nothing. 

Dancing won't contribute to vio- 
lence. Take Monty's in Westwood, 
for example. It offers live entertain- 
ment and dancing at night, and 
there's no violenoe. The plan tries to 



limit the number of establishments 
that offer dancing for no compelling 
reason. Students are ultimately affect- 
ed by those stringent regulations. 

Take a look at Westwood at night. 
The residents' complaints and regula- 
tions on Westwood's growth are 
harmful - not only are businesses 
feeling the sting, but students arc, 
too. 

The plan needs to be reformed to 
address the reality of students' being 
an inherent component of 
Westwood. Students largely keep the 
businesses - and Westwood Village - 
from completely withering. Yet when 
it comes to giving students what they 
want - a decent Westwood nightlife - 
the residents refuse to acknowledge 
our existence. It seems that some are 
forgetting that this is our town too. 
We deserve a college town where wc 
can have fun. 



Reading, not riches, the key to higher education 



ADMISSIONS: Emphasis 
on SATs as root of equily 
problem is misguided 

HcUo again, everyone! Y'all 
enjoying those exciting 
midterms? Well, if calculus 
integrals and Spanish subjunctive verb 
tenses are flooding your brain, and 
you're searching for some mental 
Drano, look no further. 

This doesn't relate to whatever 
you're studying, 
I promise you. 
Recently, one of 
my colleagiies 
voiced the opin- 
ion that my pre- 
vious column on 
Midnight YeU 
was printed at 
the wrong time, 
coming far too 
eariyinthe 
quarter to be rel- 
evant. Well, sir, 
I must protest. 

You see, that was such a crucial issue 
in cort temporary society. It needed to 
be printed right away. I mean, really, I 
don't think I could live with myself if I 
had let the mindless oppression of thft 
yellers continue for even another day. 
The column was not early, because the 
voice ofihe people must always be 
heard, no matter what the date is ... or 
something like that. OK, OK, I don't 
have a compelling reason as to why 
there was a finals columns in the 
fourth week of school, but then again, 
I don't call the shots around here. 
But enough of this quibbling. I 

Hopkins can't think of a clever tagline 
right now .„ 



would like to talk about another issue 
dear to my heart, one a tad more seri- 
ous than yelling. I want to discuss the 
SAT. No, that's not a capitalization of 
Saturday, i^'s-that test that almost all of 
us have taken at some time in our aca- 
demic lives. Remember those 
cramped little rooms? Remember 
those chewed-up pencils they 
provided? Remember those 
stupid analogies? Jeez, I 
hope so. Otherwise this 
column isn't going to 
make too much 
sense. 



to do fairiy well once at college. The 
article portrayed them as examples of 
why the SAT isn't the best indicator of 
a' student's potential. 
This is a sticky situation, no doubt 
It would be nice if 
there were a 
"nice- 



in their spare tmie, and still others ask 
odd questions which seon to have 
nothing to do with anything. Last 
year's ai^ication for Northwestern 
University asked applicants to write 
the menu for their ideal dinner, recom- 
mend agood book sead list their 
favorite words. I have no due what the 
university gets from this unconven- 
tional application, but it must serve 
its purpose somehow. It 

seems to me that 
it's probably 
just to enter- 




Brent 

Hopkins 




kind of service is more valuable for 
admissions purposes. 

Suppose you have two candidates, 
equal in all categories except for ser- 
vice. Capdidate A has 100 hours of 
volunteer service, filing papers at a 
local hospital; Candidate B took care 
of a nei^bor's children for free for 50 
hours, allowing her to get to work on 
time and feed her family. They both 
performed noble acts which benefited 
others, but it isn't really fair to say that 
one is better than the crther. This is far 
too broad a category to use as a prima- 
ry source of adntissions. 

That leaves the tests and grades. 
The main argument is against the tests, 

so III focus on them. Where do I 
stand on diis? Well, that's a . 



Though the test has 
been given for many years, it's 
still a controversial issue when it 
comes to college admissions. 
Opponents of the test claim that it is 
cuhurally biased and discriminates 
against Latinos and African 
Americans. Others also daim that the 
test doesn't represent a student's true 
abilities, and that too much weight is 
placed on scores when it comes to 
admitting new students. 

Time magazine published an article 
on the subject last November that 
brought up some interesting points. It 
showed students who fared poorty at 
the SAT and attended schools that did 
not require it as part of their admis- 
sions criteria. These students were able 



guy admittance test," where good 
people got into college - the people 
who have the desire to learn and hdp 
their communities, but might not have 
the grades or scores. Unfortunately, 
there is no test, so there must be some 
other way of admitting people to col- 
lege. That leaves us with grades; tests, 
such as the SAT and ACT; or "other." 
"Other" is the odd category used by 
some universities to try to gauge who 
the students are beyond their scores, 
and the categof y that SAT opponents 
claim is most impprtant. Some schook 
want to know how the student has 
been active in his or her community. 
Others want to know what students do 



tain the admissions staff, weary after 
reading long, stupid essays for hours at 
a time. 

Thgse *bther" things are important, 
don't get me wrong. The problem with 
them is their subjectivity. Students list 
thousands of different organizations 
which they belong to and scores of 
ways they have served their communi- 
ties. Universities can't evaluate each 
bit of community service and then use 
it to admit students. Obviously, some 
service is better than none, but they 
can't be expected to fairly assess what 



question I ask myself frequently. On 
one hand, my SAT scores hdped me 
get into bCLA, so for that reason, I 
like the test. On the other hand, with- 
out affirmative action to help level the 
playing field, 1 understand where the 
critics are coming from. This isn't a 
cut-and<lry matter, any way you look 
at it. 

When I listen to the argument that 
the test is geared toward aflluent stu- 
dents, something doesn't quite add up. 

S«eN0nQIIS,pa9e14| 



» 

j\ll power to the people!' 



On Feb. 20 Viewpoiirt will tadde the mammoth issues of nationansm aiM* 
patriotism. Should the United States be dhridcd Into various ethnic endaves, as some have suggested? What are youi noughts? Wc want to know. E-mail us at view- 

pahil0iiiedia.uda.edu or bring your submissions to 1 18 Kerdtfioff Hal. The deadline is Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 4 p.iv 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



Wednesday, February 18, 1998 13 



When punisNng criminals, less is not more 



PRISONERS: Hard labor, 
tougher sentences the 
only way to inhibit crime 

Thank God for small favors. 
After eight relatively tepid 
years as our state leader. Gov. 
Pete Wilson finally underwent one 
last bit of delayed embryonic devel- 
opment and acquired some guts. 
Having nothing 
to lose because 
of his term 
limit, Wilson 
decided to get 
tough on incar- 
cerated crimi- 
nals in 

California's 33 
prisons. The 
governor is 
releasing his 
final cloud of 

ink to convince 

us that the days 

of milk and honey in reformatories 
are no more. Much too little and far 
too late, 1 say. 

Assuming our soft-on-crime 
Democrat state legislature approves 
this new measure, prisoners will be 
denied the privilege of long, fiowing 
hair, overnight conjugal visits, gym 
equipment, law reference books and 
other amenities provided to them by 

Balekian is a third-year physiological 
sciences student who is still looking 
for parking. E-mail him at alexb- 
md@ucla.edu. 




Alex 
Balekian 



the friendly staff at the Department 
of Corrections. Convicts may soon 
kiss their ponytails and free weights 
goodbye. 

And for good reason. Why are we 
so gentle with our criminals? By try- 
ing to avoid cruel and unusual pun- 
ishment, we have followed the 
American Civil Liberties Union and 
its likes far off the beaten trail and 
become lost. Prison terms seem like 
veritable Hawaiian vacations com- 
pared to the proper correctional 
experience that they could (and 
should) be. 

Drawing parallels to everyday life 
helps paint a picture of the laxity of 
our prison systems. For instance, 
in the workplace, you can be in a 
6-by-8 cubicle, whereas in prison, 
you are in an 8-by-IO cell. In the 
real world, 1 have to pay SIS per 
month plus an ungodly start-up 
fee in order to work out, while 
prisoners have free access to the 
same equipment. I will pay over 
$40,000 for my bachelor's 
degree here at UCLA 
(provided I can gradu- 
ate in only four years), 
while the local drug 
pusher can peruse an 
extensive reading and 
reference collection gratis. Finally, " 
the last straw for those of you who . - 
don't commute: Living in the 
cramped dorms and buying meal 
plan tickets that barely cover the cost 
of a stale, three-day-old blueberry 
bagel will empty your bank account 
and then some; while you can get free 
room and board and three square 



meals a day near Chino. 

All of these luxuries, and you don't 
have to work for them. Being a bit 
more careless next time you smoke 




out can open the door to this exciting 
new world. It's no wonder that 
parolees have high violation rates 
since they see that the outside world 
is more of a burden and heartache 
than the concrete walls of prison. 
We can fix this by bearing down <^ 



on prisoners and criminals with very 
little sympathy. Why does wanting to 
regulate prisoners' hair or barring 
frequent sleepovers with their molls 
become such a 
newsworthy 
event when it 
should have been 
done long 
ago? 

Shouldn't we 
punish con- 
victs harshly 
to reform and 
prevent them 
from repeating 
their misdeeds, 
for fear of facing 
similar conse- 
quences? In a time when parents are 
afraid to even slap their children to 
discipline them, we 

have forgot- 
ten what it is 
to properly 
reform. 
All too 
often, we settle for 
counseling and therapy to 
steer miscreants in the right direc- 
tion. The Seattle schoolteacher* for 
example, who slept with her 13-year- 
old student and bore his child, 
should have immediately served her 
seven-year sentence instead of being 
released with continued psychiatric 
evaluation. Sure enough, she was 
caught again with the father of her 
child, with passports, baby clothes 
and thousands of dollars in a running 
car, apparently with hopes of fleeing 
with him. The only suitable punish- 



ment besides snuffmg her life out in 
the gas chamber would be to have her 
sterilized to prevent any future child- 
bearing. 

This option may sound harsh, but 
it will undoubtedly deter anyone who 
would have any inclination of mimic- 
king her actions. Why do we keep 
convicts in jail so that they can lay 
around idly, waiting to be paroled or 
released to ease the burden of prison 
overcrowding? What ever happened 
to the chain gang? What ever haj> 
pened to putting criminals to work at 
producing some kind, any kind, of 
positive results for society? At pre- 
sent, our lenient prisons make purga- 
tory look like eternal damnation in 
Tiell. 

Prisoners have the right to work 
out constantly and build strong bod- 
ies. They also have the right to read 
an endless supply of law books to 
find the most minor technicality on 
which to be released. They have the 
right to receive unexamined packages 
from family members, usually con- 
taining a good dose of heroin where 
the nail file used to be. They have the 
right to spend unsupervised time 
with their sweethearts in a secluded 
room with a mattress. Not only have ■ 
our prisons become crack houses and 
bordellos, but they are also the breed- 
ing ground for smarter and stronger ^ 
criminals waiting to be paroled. 

Then again, maybe we should let 
prisoners have the right to these 
amenities. Maybe we should be fool- 
ish libertarians and not subject them 

SecBaLBaAII,pa9e15 



UETTERS 



Good riddance — - 

Jdani McCoy's resignation late 
Saturday night is the best thing that 
has happened to the UCLA basket- 
ball program in the four years I have 
attended school in Westwood. He 
represents everything "bad" about 
the game today. First off, since the 
start of the 1997-1998 college basket- 
ball season, he has consistently been 
surrounded by a cloud of controver- 
sy. Qur school has a long-running 
tradition ofhaving one of the best 
college basketball programs in the 



nation. I cannot believe the UCLA 
athletic department almost allowed 
that reputation to be tarnished by 
some kid from San Diego, who has 
been treated like God, since day one. 

Secondly, let's address Jelani's 
alleged decision to enter the NBA 
next year, instead of finishing offhis 
education at one of the finest institu- 
tions in the nation. He's just another 
perfect example of a guy who plays 
for the money, with no considera- 
tion for the fact that he is a role 
model to people all over the country 
I actually hope he has a conversa- 




tion with Latrell Sprewell or Steve 
Howe, so they can let him know 
how far trouble will get you, even 
when you have enough money to 
last you th^Test of your life. 

Finally, Jelani McCoy is a quitter! 
I hope none of America's youth 
looks up to someone like this 
because it is just the perfect example 
of what someone in his situation 
shouldn't have done. I know when- 
ever I am down or not doing my 



best in a certain area of my life, 1 
always say, "Ahhh, ... I'll just give 
up! That'll solve all of my prob- 
lems!" If that.were the case, 75 per- 
cent of UCLA's freshman class 
would drop out after their first quar- 
ter here. 

Jelani, I wish you the best of luck 
with the rest of your life ... God 
knows you'll need it. I also hope you 
hit the weight room or just start 
going to In-N-Out Burger more 
often because you are going to have 
to put on a lot of pounds before the 
start of the next NBA season. The 



only thing you have in common with 
a center like Shaq is that you are 
both lousy free-throw shooters. 
Other than that, I see no reason why 
an established NBA team would 
want to draft an underweight player, 
who never averaged more than 1 1 
points a game in his three years of 
college. I hope you are lOoking for- 
ward to being a reserve player for 
the Clippers, if you're lucky enough 
to land that job! 

._ MIdiMiUrcaa 

Fourth-yew 
. Math/Economks 




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but don't know where to 
say it? Be a Viewpoint 
columnist! Applications 
are now available in the 
Daily Bruin offke, locat- 
ed in 1 18 Kerdhoff Hall. 

Applications are due 

Friday, Feb. 27 at 5 p.m. 

Late applications will not 

be accepted! 



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4 « 4 » • 4 ( ( t t » r t 



14 Wednnday, Febniary 1 8, 1 998 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



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^ 



Minorities and Legal 

Education: Preparing for 

& Applying to Law School in 

a Post- Affirmative Action Era 

Sponsored By: 

UCLA School of Law in Conjunction with 

the Law School Admission Council's 

National Minority Recruitment Month 

Guest Speaker: 
Michael D. Rappaport 

Dean of Admission 
UCLA School of Law 



> 



♦♦♦ 



Thursday, Fabruary 19 
4:00 p.m. 
* Room 1347 School of Uw 
(310) S2S-20eo for information 



^ 



5J 



Tired of getting 





in the 






Lottery sign-ups for - , , 

meeting rooms t 
banner space 

•■ ■ • 

in Ackerman Union and Kerckhoff Hall for 

r------ ~-— — — — — — — — - — -— — . — —- — _« 

[ CSP Roistered StHdent Groups 

will take place during 

7th week, 

Monday, Feb.23 through 

' Wednesdoy, Feb.25 

Student Union info Window i 

[ (A-Level, Ackerman Union) j 




appointment times posted Friday, February 27 

Student Hnii 



For information contact 

Meeting Room Reservations 

310.206.0833. 




uent Seruices 



UCLII 



SmOFHT IIHinH 



■'S 



HOPKINS 



From page 12 

however. Supposedly, students who 
come from more wealthy back- 
grounds are guaranteed better grades 
because they are given extra help by 
professional tutors My family is not 
swimming in money, but my parents 
were concerned with my education. 
They never paid for classes to instruct 
me on how to score higher on the 
tests, but they did make sure I knew 
the ipiportance of doing well. At the 
time, I dismissed this as some bizarre 
conspiracy between my parents to 
ruin my social life and generally annoy 
me. Once I finished the test, I saw that 
maybe oP mom and dad did know a 
thing or two. 

Those pointing fingers also single 
out the fact that predominantly minor- 
ity high schools do not perform as well 
on the lest as majority schools, 
because of the lack of funds and par- 
ent booster money to support stu- 
dents. Speaking as a graduate of a 
high school where whites only made 
up 10 percent of the student body, I 
can say that this is not true either. 
Sure, the rich guys across town may 
have had pretty campuses, nice foot- 
ball uniforms and parking lots filled 
with BMWs, but that doesn't mean 
my school didn't offer a lot of pro- 
grams for interested students. 

From ninth grade on, we were 
pulled from class and inserted into 
PSAT and SAT prep classes, with our 
principal haranguing us about how 
important it was to do well on the test 
Looking around the room, I didn't see 
a bunch of wealthy white people, I 
saw people from all backgrounds. 
There were far more "underrepresent- 
ed minorities" than there were any 
other group. 

I never found those sessions to be 
particulariy helpful, but I'm sure they 
were useful to some of the people 
there. What was important to me was 
something quite difterenL something ' 
that anyone can use. If you're using 
this paper for something other than 
something to sit on, then you have 
learned it, too. Wow, I feel like Mr. 
Rogers, saying this. But hey, ol* Fred 
seemed to know a thing or two about 
life, so I guess I'll just roll with it. 

The thing that did make a differ- 
ence for me was something avaiktble 
to every man, woman, child and what- 
ever other category you want to 
include in there: reding. No prep 
classes, no special schooling, no trips 
to Europe to study medieval history; it 
was books that made a difference. It's 
not like I had some better books just 
because of my race; they were found 
in the public library. You don't even 
have to be reading Shakespeare at age 
five to learn how to read well. I know I 
wasn't. I must have read every Hardy 
Boys mystery ever written, some sev- 
eral times, and I'd say (using one of 
those famed SAT analogies) that 
Frank aiui Joe arc to good literature 
as chicken-fried steak is to fine cui- 
sine. 

What started^t home as a good 
rainy-day pastime was cultivated in 
school. The books I read in school 
were not just "dead white guy" 
authors, they were written by men and 
women from all over the globe. We 
read South American short stories. 
New England poetry, medieval epics 
and slave history. I didn't like reading 
many of them at the time, but now I 
see that's what helped me get to col- . 
lege, not some self-impressed lecturer 
who droned on and on about analo- 
gies and critical reading. 

If students want to improve their 
scores on any test, not just the SATs, 
they need only make a trip to their 
local library. You will be able to find 
what you need jn the stacks there, not 
in an expensive dass or flash-card 
game. Libraries don't check at the 
door for your race, and you've already 
paid for them with your hard^arned 
dollars in the form of taxes. 
The SATs don't have questions 



SceHOPUNS, panels 



r" 



DadyBfuin Viewpoint 



HOPKINS 



From page 14 

about culture, they have questions 
about common sense. There's nothing 
"On there about which year of Dom 
Perignon goes best with swordfish, or 
who originally played the Phantom of 
the Op^ra. I have no idea what the 
answer to either is, and I didn't have 
to know them for the test. My scores 
turned out OK not because of some- 
thing I'd learned from hiy "culture," 
but from things I'd read in books. 

For those concerned with minority 
admissions now that Proposition 209 
is in effect, I sympathize with you 
completely. 1 wish that there could be 
a more equitable solution for admit- 
ting minorities to college, one that 
would attempt to make up for the dis- 
crimination and inequality in society. I 
agree that things are not as fair as they 
should be and can't ofTer an easy solu- 
tion, but I don't think that the SAT is 
the problem. 



BALEKIAN 



From page 13 

to any type of cruelty. Try convinc- 
ing the widow of a store owner who 
was shot at point-blank range that 
the man who pulled the trigger 
should simply loaf around in prison 
with his luxuries while $he wakes up 
every day to work twice as hard as 
before to keep tht business running. 
Try to prevent a would-be juvenile 
delinquent from spray-painting a 
wall or stealing a bicycle when the 
justice system is powerless even to lit- 
erally give him a slap on the hand. 

Now see if you cannot accomplish 
the aforementioned tasks if prisoners 
are forced into hard laborfor th?tf 
crimes, if teenage gangsters are faced 
with breaking rocks or bearing the 
brunt of a paddle swung at very high ' 
speeds. 

The state of Texas came under fire 
for killing a "reformed" female pris- 
oner for a grisly double murder she 
committed a whopping 14 years ago. 
Opponents of the death penalty stat- 
ed that the born-again Christidn 
woman who was about to die was not 
the woman who committed those 
crimes. If Texas officials had killed 
her as soon as -the verdict was hand- 
ed down instead of giving her 14 
years in prison to find Jesus, this 
would never have happened. 
Everyone would have rejoiced that a 
drug-addicted, maniacal murderer 
was dead. Put them out quickly and 
let God take it fVom there. 

These ideas may be seem extreme 
because we have strayed so far from 
the ideal purpose of a prison. 
Halfway around the world, devel- 
oped nations kill suspects and then 
hope that they really committed the 
crimes. Prisoners in other countries 
are carted into the desert to develop 
the arid land with hard labor and 
make it inhabitable for others. What 
debt is Charles Manson paying to 
society at this very moment besides 
being one impetus among many forc- 
ing prison wardens to thin out the 
prison population with early releas- 
es? 

We should kill more murderers 
more often and let the violent blood- 
shed do its work on deterring other 
criminals. If the gas chamber or the 
electric chair is too cruel or too 
expensive to maintain, bring back 
the guillotine. Cut the cord and let 
gravity do its work in less than a sec- 
ond. 

The justice system may involve a 
trial, but it also involves suitable pun- 
ishment; that's why we've got a 
blindfolded woman with a balance 
and a sword gracing every court- 
room in America. That sword has 
rusted and her right arm has atro- 
phied from disuse. If the niceties in 
prison become few and far between, 
then we will have been on the right 
path in properly reforming prisoners 
for their crimes. 



Wednesday, February 18, 1998 15 





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16 Wednesday, Ftbruary 18, 1998 



Daily Bruin Arts A Entertainment 



Wfdnevlay, February 18, 1998 17 



•J\ 



ARTS 




ENTERTAINMENT 



- ■■ ' ' .■ 3- 




The Dance Hall Crashers 

know how to have a good 

time, bringing a youthful 

audience to its feet with 

blend of punk, pop 

and ska 




PftOKK by MICHAa ROSS WACHT 

Karina Oenikc (foreground) with Elys* Rodgers and Mikey Weiss (background l-r) of Dance Hall Crashers perform for the audience at The Roxy. 



T* 



ByMididleZubiatc 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Rod Stewart comes close with 
"Forever Young." David 
Bowie's "Teenage Wildlife" 
almost hits it. Even Tony Bennett's 
"Young and Foolish" has the right 
idea. But no song can truly capture 
what Dance Hall Crashers truly 
embodies in their energy and vigor: 
the juvenile spirit. 

On Feb. 13. the pop/punk/ska 
group Dance Hall Crashers (DHC) 
gave a stellar performance, to their 
younger fans at The Roxy in 
Hollywood. Through a compilation 
of old favorites from their previous 



albums and a few new hits from their 
most recent album, "Honey I'm 
Homely," DHC gave their loyal fol- 
lowers a performance of electricity 
and compelling drives. 

The audience, in return, made it 
clear that it didn't matter what was 
played, as long as DHC continuously 
fed them the vitality their sound is a 
trademark of. The Roxy on the chilly 
night before Valentine's Day was the 
place to shout, sing and have a blast. 

Fans usually aren't sure what 
words describe DHC and their music. 
"Fast," "rockin"' and "awesome" 
come to mind, but as far as putting an 
adjective to their style ... fans are 
often left without a clue. Older fans 



would contend that their songs are 
strictly punk, but then again there are 
hints of >ka influences. Their new 
album proves that their music has 
evolved into a more pop-style rock 
than, say, older albums like 
"Lockjaw" or "Old Record." 

Since the band first emerged 
roughly seven years ago in Berkeley, 
they have found their own style and 
their own groove which is distin- 
guished from rock's stereotypes. The 
two lead singers, Karina Denike and 
Elyse Rogers, use both unique har- 
monies and outstanding solo vocals to 
create mass appeal anwng their fans. 

SeeaUSNEIIS,|M9e21 




-J^' -^^^^=-.=»i: 




-^iit. 



Fans sing with the Dance Hall Crashers onstage as Karina Danike 
looks on. 



1 »»>'.•■«<■- 



Lead singer Karina Oenika rocks the excited, youthful crowd at 
The Roxy's pre-Valentine show. 



1 






Wayans employs all senses to the max 



FILM: Youngest brother follows 
oldex siblings' footsteps with 
first starring role in movie 



ByAimccPhan ' 

Daily Bruin Staff 

Being the youngest in a family of 10 kids can 
be tough. Especially in a family full of comedi- 
ans. Marlon Wayans, whose new comedy 
"Senseless" opens Friday, believes that while 
being the youngest does have its advantages, 
like learning from his older siblings' experi- 
ences and getting their advice, it mostly 
involves being the butt of everyone's jokes. 

"In a normal family, I'd be the baby," 
Wayans says. "But in my family, I'm some- 
thing that you would call a victim. Every joke is 
on me, basically. They were never mean to me, 
but they were comedians and their jobs were to 
make fun, and I was the butt." 

But the jokes in the family soon became 
their formula for success in Hollywood. And 
the name "Wayans" became synonymous with 
edgy urban comedy. Led by big brother 
Keenan, who left college to try stand-up come- 
dy. Marlon follows a long line of Wayans 
comedians who have found success in televi- 
sion and m6vies. The Wayans' impact on tele- 
vision is es(>ecially significant starting with the 
popular comedy-sketch show "In Living 
Color." The show was a family affair with 
Keenan as executive producer and siblings 
Damon. Kim.~ Shawn and Marlon as cast 
members. Their presence on television contin- 
ues today with Keenan 's late-night talk show 
and Shawn and Marlon's Warner Bros. 
Network show, aptly named "The Wayans 
Brothers." 

Before the family hit it big in Hdlywood, 
Wayans and his brothers and sisters grew up in 
New. York City's lower-income Chelsea dis- 
trict where his mother worked part-time as a 
social worker, and his father was, as Wayans 
puts it, not an entrepreneur, but an "entre- 



poor-noor. • ' 

"He sold condoms and sunglasses and won- 
ders why he's broke," Wayafis says. "The only 
good days were sunny days when everybody's 
horny." 

But Keenan 's success as a comedian in 
Hollywood soon paved the way for many of his 
siblings to set their ambitions higher than most 
of the other kids living in the projects. Wayans 
remembers visiting his oldest brother in 
California and realizing that there was a life for 
him outside of the projects. 

"That pretty much opened up my eyes to 
the world out there," Wayans says, "that 
there's not just the projects. In the projects, 
successful is the penthouse project apartment, 
and that's what people strive for. But Keenan 
broke us out of that mold by doing what he 
did." 

In his new film "Senseless." Wayans plays a 
broke but ambitious Ivy-league college student 
who tries to support his family and stay in 
school by taking as many part-time jobs as pos- 
sible. His character, so desperate for money. 



even volunteers for an experimental test drug 
that radically alters his five senses, which is 
wherfc the .movie takes off. Wayans says he 
sympathizes with his character's financial 
state, remembering his own odd jobs growing 
up. 

"I've been working since I was 10 years 
old," Wayans says. "My first 'job' job was at a 
pizza shop, and I got paid $25 every two weeks 
and all the free pizza I could eat. So I was 
broke, bloated and constipated." 

In the movie. Wayans uses his character's 
off-the-wall schemes to make money to push 
the comedic envelope with physical comedy, 
bathroom humor and racy jokes. Wayans says 
much of the humor was improvised and 
proved to be the funniest scenes in the movie. 

"You can't set boundaries for yourself," 
Wayans says. "As a comedian, you want to be 
totally uninhibited. If you're inhibited, you 
can't be funny. You need a director who won't 

S«eSEIISaESS,pa9e20 




Dimension Fikm 

Marion Wayans plays a college student desperate for money in 'Senseless.' 



'Out of Actions' sets out to provoke reactions 



ART: Modem representations 
reject aesthetically pleasing 
exterior, address deeper issues 



By nHMSa wMMMf Zmomi 
Daily Bruin Staff 

Sometimes modem art seems transcenden- 
tal. Sometimes, it appears more real than actual 
life. Sometimes, it's just weird. 

Take the exhibit currently showing at The 
Geffen Contem|X>rary at the Museum of 
Contemporary Art in downtown Lo« Angeles 
until May 10. Titled "Out of Actions: Between 
Performance and the Object, 194^1979," the 
exhibit revolves around prooes»<entered art. 
That is, art which remains more concerned with 
how it found creation than its actual form. 

A perfectly grotesque example of this con- 
cept exists in Paul McCarthy's 1974 piece, 
"Meatcake." This inclusion documents a per- 
formance he once gave, with eight pages of text 
outlining his actions and three photographs 
visually depicting them. The result is more than 
a little disturbing, yet infuiitely intriguing. 

He notes in the documents, "- threw up / - 
make myself white with maynase / in the corner 
threw up / - 1 will be inbarest / - tape my leg to 
my penis," and later, "shoving food in my crotch 
/ - bending over and doing it so my ass is facing 
them / - pants arc filled with food." 

The accompanying pictures neveal 
McCarthy wearing a sea captain's cap and suit 
with his pants pulled down and his underwear 
overflowing with hamburger meat and catsup. 
A siphon runs from his mouth to his genitab. 



while food and vomit coat his face and soil his 
clothing. Meanwhile, the audience looks on in 
abhorrence. 

Apparently, this representation provides a 
piercing social commentary on the proliferation 
of or lack of self-degradation in the world at 
large. Regardless, it plays the same role as road 
kill - you hate to look but can't take your eyes 
away. 

In numy ways, Robert Delford Brown and 
Rhett Delford Brown echo McCarthy's contro- 
versial subject matter in their 1964 piece, "The 




Th» Muwum 01 Con«mpoi»ry A/t 



The Museum of Contemporary Art's 
"Out of Actions: Between Perfonmance 
and Object,* is on display until May 10. 



Meat Show." This work includes the life-size 
models of two slaughtered sheep and one pig 
hanging by ropes from their legs before a blood- 
stained parachute. The informative document 
to the left details how the pair of artists original- 
ly hung oodles of butchered beasts in a walk-in 
freezer in Greenwich Village and sold tickets to 
the event for 75 cents. 

While this work reflects the atrocities appar- 
ent in man's lust to cat meat, it aosses the bor- 
der between art and life. By taking a tour of a 
common slaughterhouse freezer, the artists 
force us to question the humanity of our own 
standard feeding practices. This re-evaluation 
of everyday reality shines throu^ in many of 
the show's works. 

For example, Ben Vautier's 1962 addition 
"Ben's Window," reconstructs the window 
front which Vautier inhabited when his piece 
originally appeared in a Minneapolis art center. 
The work reveals a variety of bedroom items 
including a bed, bureau and bedside lamp, with 
white-out labeling and comments on the collec- 
tion of objects. For instance, "dirty water" dons 
the side of an old fish tank, "rotting meat with 
flies" decorates the side of a dingy bake pan, and 
"don't look at me" glares from the interior glass 
ofa photo frame. 

Consequently, Vautier provides a voice for 
inanimate objects and redesigns the silent world 
which we take for granted. Almost as an unin- 
tentional addition to this work, a regularly 
clanging drone fills the entire museum space 
from some eerie, unidentifiable piece. In this 
way, even the silence has a voice. 

Likewise, Robert Morris suggests that there 

SccJICII0IIS^pa9c19 






18 Wednesday, February 18, 1998 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainimiit 



Bob Mariey and the Wallers, ''The 
Complete Wallers 1%7-1972 Part I," 
(JAD) It looks like the ^Beatles' 
"Anthology" phenomenon has carried 
over to the reggae world. This three- 
disc collection is a must Tor serious 
reggae fans, as well as the curious and 
those devoted to the Wailers, the 
group reggae-legend Bob Mariey 
fronted before embarking on a his suc- 
cessful solo career. 

The three-disc set includes three 
separate albums, all of which some- 
times carry different versions of songs 
on the other two (here comes the 
Beatles' "Anthology" comparison). 
The first album represented is the rare 
"Rock to the Rock" album, which car- 
ries the earliest incarnations of the 
Wailers (from 1967-68). which includ- 
ed Mariey, his wife, Rita, and Peter 
Tosh and Bunny Wailer. Most of the 
songs take the popular "rock steady" 
reggae sound, which was a slower, 
rock-pop influenced style, and mixes it 
with many '60s harmonizing/vocal 
styles. You can see the impression 
American R&B, pop and Motown 
had on the Wailers with such tunes as 
"Treat You Right," "Chances Are" 
and "There She Goes," without sacri- 
ficing that distinct reggae sound. 

The second album is the even rarer 
"Selassie is the Chapel" release from 
the 1968-1970 era. This album shares a 
lot of the "rock steady" and '60s 
American pop>-music styles from the 
"Rock to the Rock" album, but with 
"Selassie," the Wailers start experi- 
menting more with different sounds 
and rhythms. It almost sounds less like 
the traditional reggae we know of 
today. But the magic of "Selassie" 
comes in the Wailers' burgeoning spir- 
ituality and their discovery of the 
Rastafarian religion. Their passion for 
Jah, the god of the Rastafarians, 
shines throughout their positive 
music, which includes the title-track 
hymn, "Tread Oh" and "The Lord 
Will Make a Way." Included also is a 





BOBMARLEY 

"The Complete Wailers 

1%7-1972Partr 



cover of the Box Tops' "The Letter" 
(titled "Give Me a Ticket" here) and 
the Wailers' classic "Rocking Steady. ' 

And the third record is simply 
titled, "The Best of the Wailers ( 1969- 
70)," the true highlight of this multi- 
disc set. Considered the first "con- 
cept" album of reggae, the record was 
actually a commercial flop at the time, 
but many reggae aficionados point to 
its influential relevance now. "Best of 
comprises a more polished sound, 
thanks to the late Leslie Kong's pro- 
duction efforts, and displays the tal- 
ents of stars-in-the-making. Bob 
Mariey and Peter Tosh. The '60s pop 
music influences remain, but "Best 
of offers a more "straight-up" reggae 
sound than the other two albums 
included in this set. The signature, 
optimistic anthems, along with such 
covers of such pop songs as Jr. 
Walker's "Hold On to This Feelmg." 
the Archies' bubblegum hit, "Sugar 
Sugar" and another version of "The 
Letter," make "Best of even more of 
an enjoyable listening experience than 
the rest of "The Complete Wailers." 

This collection, as a whole, repre- 
sents a satisfying and comprehensive 
history-in-song of the most influential 
reggae artists of the '60s and '70s. 
Reggae fans, as well as people interest- 



ed in the culture, ^volution and inspi- 
rations of the Jamaican-rooted music 
genre, will surely find 
"The Complete Wailers" delightfully 
impressive. Mike Prevatt A- 

Pee Shy, "Don't Get Too 
ComfortaUe," (Mercury) Alternative 
pop-rock can often achieve great play- 
ful tunes but, at the same time, fall into 
the Sesame-Street syndrome of over- 
simplified melodies. In their second 
major label release. Pee Shy fine-tunes 
their bright, giddy sounds to create 
real pop-rock fun without resorting to 
cheesy nursicry rhymes. 

The first track and single of the 
album, "Mr. Whisper," shows exactly 
what the band is capable of, namely 
funky beat-happy rhythms and a cute- 
ly odd quirkiness in the female vocals. 
From bridge to chorus, the mood 
remains light and plain but not with- 
out talent. True, at times sappiness can 
get dull, but Pee Shy tends to stay 
away from static rehashing of the 
same tunes by creating dynamic 
songs. "Jad Fair" eases into an ethere- 
al melody that carefully ponders 
"What is this space left to fill/ a bull's 
eye forever ..." A little abstract, but it 
takes a small but distinct step away 
fronf surf ace lyrics. 



Faster beats excite songs such lis 
"Much Obliged" and "Fear." 
Through their humorous tone. Pee 
Shy mixes both slow and fast acoustic- 
guitar beats for listeners everywhere. 

It cannot be considered serious 
rock, but it putts off sarcasm in a 
mature fashion. It's a relieving dose of 
mind-numbirtg picks for the midterm 
blues. Michelle Zubiate B 

Jatnes Iha, ''Let It Come Down," 
(Virgin) Yes, it's a little dopey. Yes, it's 
a little foofey. But what's wrong with 
being a gentle romantic in the midst of 
a cruel world? James Iha's first solo 
album, "Let It Come Down," veers 
from the usually disillusioned, embit- 
tered pieces found on his efforts with 
The Smashing Pumpkins. And though 
it might not Ik what one would expect 
from the hard-rocking guitarist, it 
remains a calm, sweet background to 
whatever make-out session you may 
have planned. Or moody bout with a 
lack of a sex life, as the case may be. 
Either way, the meandering pace of 
Iha's borderline sappy vocals in his 
down-home songs reflect a tenderness 
that, no doubt, will never break into 
the mainstream. 

Regardless, the timeless lyrics on 
songs like "Lover, Lover" still manage 
to strike a chord, with Iha crooning 
lines like "Lover, darling, when you 
hold my hand / It's all I'll have 'til 
tomorrow." In many ways, "Let It 
Come Down" is just a bunch of love 
songs, like a 'SOs LP intent on turning 
chicks to jelly as they dream of their 
one and only. Though it may be a tad 
out of place in today's musical atmos- 
phere of self-indulging pain junkies 
and poppy, feel-good, one-hit won- 
ders, it remains a worthwhile listen. 
The plain and simple pieces hearken 
back to a more soothing era where it 
was okay to swoon about the illusion 
of love. Where it was okay to believe 
that things would work out. When ide- 
alism wasn't a four-letter word. Ah, 



Calgon, take me 
VanderZanden A- 



away! Vanessa 



God Uvea Underwater, ''Life in the 
S&CaUed Space Age," (1500/ A&M 
Records) Increasingly, bands rely on 
an electronic fad to-support their lack 
of talent or creativity. There are a few 
bands, however, that come out of syn- 
thesized madness to relieve fans with 
truly great hits. Most become a combo 
of both. Dabbling in techno-rock key- 
boards and electronic computer 
sounds, God Lives Underwater's 
third release proves both more appeal- 
ing and well-constructed than other 
albums, but it still has its flaws. 

Within the album, those computer 
sounds can either strengthen or create 
unnecessary background noise. For 
the most part, it's the former, but in 
cases such as in the song "Vapors," 
those sounds become excessive. 
"Vapors" has a great core, but its 
obnoxious digital intro and phony 
Beatles-ish ending weighs down its 
potential. 

The album also forms many con- 
trasts in quality between songs. At 
times its electroriic overtones can cre- 
ate uneasiness and disturbing reac- 
tions, but at the same time can demon- 
strate probing and meth<»dic melodies. 
Such is the case in "Rearrange" and 
"Can't Come Down." 

The best song of the album 
"Happy?" is a combination of melodi- 
cally touching lyrics and hauntingly 
ethereal rhythms. Its lyrics have that 
element of love-lost emotion that 
makea many of their songs moving 
such as "And 1 hope that you're 
happy/ At least one of us is/ 1 hope one 
day you'll see/ 1 need you to save me." 

Songs such as "TheJlush Is Loud," 
however, have real intense moments, 
but those odd generated mixes in com- 
bination with monotone vocals are far 
from appealing. "Life in" is a confus- 
ing jumble of great songs and geeky 
tunes. Michelle Zulnate B- 



Be an Orientation Assistant 
and see the world! 

Ok. Maybe not. But it's still a fun experience. 

And it's a good paying summer job. 

Pick up an application at the 

Orientation Program office at 201 Covel Commons. 




Qu'^stions^ P^e.-i^/^ ^^11 th^ Orientation Progiani office at (210) 206-66^5 



n 



I 



Daily Brain Arts & Entertainment 



Wednesday, February 18,1998 . 19 



'Mrs. Dalloway' explores W6olfs duality 



AQIONS 



FILM: Vanessa Redgrave 
captures psychological 
nature of author's life 



Daily Bruin Contributor 

The wave of recent British dramatic 
films has cloyed the public with a 
grossly sweet aftertaste. Maybe 
because these films have a packaged 
Americanness about them - complete 
with American leads and directors and 
the tar of Hollywood sentimentality 
that is dumped onto production. 

But "Mrs. Dalloway," a film based 
on the Virginia Woolf novel, hopes to 
offer a panacea to this overdose of 
frilly pictures by changing the formula 
with the cream of English actors and 
filmmakers. 

The film revolves around Qarissa 
Dalloway, who confronts the decisions 
she made 30 years earlier. In the the 
midst of 1923 London, she revisits her 
memories of long ago, when she was 
single, hopeful and on the brink of 
making iinportant decisions. Her life 
is profoundly touched by Septimus 
Warren Smith (Rupert Graves), a 
young soldier emerging shell-shocked 
from Worid War L 

For those who love Virginia 
Woolf s writing, this film could be a 
glimpse into the psychological duality 
of Woolf herself, embodied in the 
characters of Mrs. Dalloway and 
Septimus. The character of Mrs. 



Dalloway glimmers of the "shy but 
snobbish" social butterfly side of 
which Woolf was very conscious. But 
Mrs. Dalloway and Septimus together 
represent the troubled author who suf- 
fered a series of mental breakdowns. 

Fearing her own insanity and the 
coming of World War II, Woolf com- 
mitted suicide. 

"She put that in both Septimus and 
Mrs. Dalloway, who, from a very eariy 
age, was aware of a sori of lurking 
insanity," says Director Marleen 
Oorris. 

Veteran actress Vanessa Redgrave 
brings her interpretation of Mrs. 



w^^*^m 




fif« Look Pictures 

VMMSsa Redgrave stars as Mrs. 
Dalloway in this film adaptation. 



Dalloway's conflicting sensibilities to 
the screen. 

A patient and easy Redgrave sits in 
the Four Seasons Hotel with the Los 
Angeles hustle down below. She 
attempts to describe her close relation- 
ship with the title character in "Mrs. 
Dalloway." which will be released on 
Friday. 

"I feel so close to Mrs. Dalloway 
that i feel like I know her better than 
anybody." Redgrave says. The glaring, 
overcast sky frames her white-blonde 
hair. Her mirthful blue eyes look away 
when she speaks with the absolute 
involvement that radiates from a 
woman whose acting career has 
spanned a strong four decades. 

"I have to really work hard to find 
out why I feel that close. I feel I know 
Mrs. Dalloway better than still I know 
my own daughters or my own moth- 
er," Redgrave continues. 

The actress' passion for Woolfs 
genius is readily apparent as she 
exclaims, "I couldn't believe what a 
mind like that could do!" 

She and the film's screenwriter, 
Eileen Atkins, would pore over 
Woolfs work in long, late-night dis- 
cussions when working together on 
"Vita and Virginia," a play about 
Woolf 

That is where Atkins told Redgfave 
that she couldn't see anybody else 
playing the part of Mrs. Dalloway. But 
Redgrave is nothing like Mrs. 
Dalloway. In fact, she sees more simi- 

Scc0iLUMIMr.pa9e20 



From page 1 7 

exists a space surrounding every indi- 
vidual being that, though invisible, 
takes a very solid form. Made in 1961, 
he calls his work "Untitled (Standing 
Box)." 

It's a tall, unpainted wooden box. 
It's the height of the artist. When he 
stands in it, as he does in the picture 
next to the box, he is said to be "per- 
forming the box." 

Continuing in this simplistic vein, 
one of John 

Cage's musical "^"^"""""^^ 
scores takes up 
several square 
feet of one of the 
museum walls. 
His piece details 
when the per- 
former should 
"Pour water from 
receptacle to 
another" and 
play the "duck 



The entire display ... 

mostly just intrigues 

viewers with the very 

avant garde nature of 

its content. 



'whistle in bowl of water (as long as 
breath holds - but not past)." With 
such careful instructions, it would 
seem difficult to mess up the piece. 

Saburo Murakami's piece 
"Work," takes a slightly more confus- 
ing form. While the piece seems to 
only be made up of red and black 
peeling paint on a slab of wood, the 
"viewer is invited to interact with this 
work by listening to the interior clock 
that rings with different bells at 
unpredictable moments." Are the 
bells conceptual, only to be heard 
after hours of morphing with the visu- 
al intricacies of the textured piece? 



Equally bizarre is Nam June 
Paik's "Integral Piano," which con- 
sists of three upright pianos. Though 
all appear somewhat haggard with 
age, the central instrument has wires 
spilling out of it as well as peculiar 
items glued to it. Examples include 
barbed wire, a bra, an alarm clock, a 
telephone, toy cars and egg shells. 
Beautiful is not the word to describe 
it, though it seems dubious that Paik's 
intentions remain grounded in receiv- 
ing such common praise. 

But who knows what reaction he 
expected? In fact, most of the works 
on display seem 
'^~'""~'^^^~ best experienced 
in live form, 
though the exist- 
ing collection still 
manages to catch 
the eye. The 
entire display, 
despite its ability 
to express higher 
' levels of con- 
1 sciousness, most- 
ly Just intrigues 
viewers with the very avant garde 
nature of its content. -^-pr**- 
So maybe most f>eople won't reaJ- 
ly "get it." They'll probably walk 
around, gawking at the twisted 
pieces, utterly amused and more than 
a little baffled. But is that so terrible? 

ART: 'Out of Actions: Between 
Performance and the Object, 1949- 
1979" shows through May 10 at the 
Geffen Contemporary at the Museum 
of Contemporary Art located at 152 
North Central Ave. Admission is $6 and 
$4 for seniors and students with ID. For 
more information, call (213) 621-2766. 




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20 Wednesday, February 18, 1998 



Daily Brum Arts & Entertainment 



Natural History of 
Southern California, Earth 

and Space Sciences 20, Spring 

1998. No prerequisites, GE 

course credit in physical or life 

sciences; enrollment limited to 17 

students. Lecture, 2 hrs.; lab, 3 

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SENSELESS 



From page 17 

limit you and will let you go all the way 
and then pull you back a little." 

Wayans got that with Director 
Penelope Sphceris ("Wayne's 
World," "The Little Rascals"), who 
encouraged the actors to bring ideas 
to the set and then included the best or 
them in the film. 

"Penelope was great because she 
allowed me to improvise like I did," 
Wayans says. "1 loved working with 
Penelope, aside from my brother. But 
that's family. It was the best experi- 
ence 1 had working with the director." 

The feeling is mutual for Spheeris 
who says that Wayans and the chil- 
dren in "The Little Rascals" have 
been her favorite actors to work with. 
Spheeris was especially impressed 
with Wayans' generous nature and 
friendliness with everyone around the 
set. 

"He makes everybody feel good," 
Spheeris says. "He never complains, 
and he's funny as hell. He comes in the 
morning and gives everyone on the set 
a hug. 

"You can't beat this kid. He's one 
of my favorite people I've ever met in 
my life, definitely my favorite actor 
I've ever worked with." 

With "Senseless" being his first 
leading role in a film, Wayans is 
unsure whether he would want the 
kind of superstardom that actors like 
Eddie Murphy and "In Living Color" 
alumnus Jim Carrey have after mak- 
ing it big in comedic movies. 

"I wouldn't mind making that kind 
of money but that lifestyle of not being 
able to go out in the public, you lose a 
part of yourself," Wayans says. "I take 
my hat off to them for just accepting 
that role. If that happens (for me), hey, 
as long as I work, I'm happy." "^ 

For Wayans, he is just happy to 
have a job he finally likes. 

"It's not about the stardom or the 
money," Wayans says. "It's the fact 
that I wake up in the morning and I 
want to go to work. I love to go to 
work." 

FILM: "Senseless' opens Friday. 



DALLOWAY 



From page 19 

larities between Mrs. Dalloway and 
her own mother. Like Redgrave's 
mother, Mrs. Dalloway is a woman 
who is by turns pure and strongly soul- 
ful. 

"My mother's a very innocent 
woman coming from a country back- 
ground where the women had long- 
ings to do things but didn't," 
Redgrave says. "My mother never 
had much of an education. ... She 
always felt a bit intimidated by (her 
husband) and his colleagues who had 
all been to university ... and who all 
had the means to evaluate works of art 
and literature and she hadn't. She had 
her soul and she did respond in a won- 
derful, uncomplicated and simple 
way." 

Redgrave's familiarity with Mrs. 
Dalloway stems from the satori-like 
light bulb that comes from immersing 
oneself in art. 

"I see a chameleon change color, 
but that's just a natural process. It 
doesn't involve the chameleon's mind, 
right?" Redgrave says. "But there are 
some works of art, and a character in 
a great novel is a great work of art, as 
well. As you go close, your mind 
comes up and merges with what the 
writer's written, your whole mind 
changes color and you become part of 
that, at least that's how I feel it. ~ ~ 

"You stop talkmg about acting or 
preparing," Redgrave continues. "It 
just becomes part of you." 

Redgrave is not only a storyteller 
but a listener, hungry for the journal- 
ists to engage her with their knowl- 



SecMUailffir,pa9c21 






^^^SSS^Sm 



DaHy Bniin Arts ft Entertainment 



DALLOWAY 



From page 20 

edge as much as she does in turn. 

"I'm still very ill-read, so I depend 
on my meetings with people like your- 
selves," Redgrave admits. "I mean it 
was a journalist that actually said to 
me about a week ago, i think you 
should play "Long Day's Journey into 
Night."' 1 was very grateful for that " 



CRASHERS 



From page 16 

Bassist Mikey Weiss, drummer 
Gavin Hammon and guitarist Jason 
Hammon complement the band's 
clean-cut image but, at the same time, 
uphold its sarcastic attitude. 

Opening with a rivet of drums and 
screaming teenagers and 20-some- 
things. Dance Hall Crashers cap- 
tured the crowd from the beginning. 
The first few songs of the set included 
old" favorites that immediately 
pleased those fans of their punkier 
sound era. 

Rogers and Denike confidently 
dominated the stage and took advan- 
tage of The Roxy's small club atmos- 
phere to create a crowd/performer 
connection at every chance possible. 

Rogers' cute, stylish black hair 
with bangs and Denike's floral skirt 
and blouse gave the two a distinct 
retro-esque image of quasi-inno- 
cence. Their bold lyrics and brash 
vocals, however, proved they were 
more than sweet little girls. They 
hopped about the stage, often calling 
for the crowd to constantly "jump!" 

The audience willingly obliged. 
And DHC twisted and grooved, initi- 
ated sing-a4ongs and even challenged 
the crowd to maintain their "bounce" 
throughout an entire song. Past the 
smiles and the charisma was a band 
who, as evident in the hushed pants 
and slightly glowing faces, gave it 
their all and did not hold back. 

In return, the crowd gave its own 
contfibution to the show. Besides the 
usual tiresome crowd-surfing, they 
often broke out in silly inconiprehen- 
sible chants. At one point, the band 
invited loads of giggling girls on stage 
to take over and sing their own rendi- 
tion of "He Wants Me Back." It was 
the perfect song for independent 
women who were feeling a little extra 
bitter on the oight before the dreaded 
V-J>ay. Even though the scene 
invoked remembrances of that third- 
grade Christmas pageant or last 
wedc's Karaoke night at Shakey's, it 
won the crowd over with charming 
humor and fun. 

Those favorite songs are what real- 
ly got the crowd on its feet every time. 
The uncanny "So Sue Us" is charac- 
teristic of their hyper - "I don't give a 
shit" style. The house cheered and 
sang along with every word. 

"Lost Again," a new hit, has 
recently seen a lot of air time on the 
radio and even was featured on a 
recent episode of "Beverly Hills, 
90210." Songs such as "Mr. Blue" 
and "Queen For A Day" had great 
slammin' guitar moments and dished 
out danceable beats all over the place. 
This element is clearly something you 
cannot get from just listening to the 
album, due in part because Dance 
Hall Crashers are gifted live perform- 
ers as well as talented musicians. 

Although DHC gave an encore of 
"The Truth About Me" and two other 
old hits, the set ended entirely too 
soon. Many of the band's other 
favorites were saved for the next 
night's show to the disappointment of 
those unable to attend both perfor- 
mances. A few fans voiced their dis- 
approval over the fact that not 
enough songs were played from their 
newest album, "Honey I'm Homely!" 
But DHC's vitality shined and left a 
packed Roxy screaming through the 
finale, happily satisfied, if not yearn- 
ing for more. , :, 



Wednesday, February 18, 1998 21 



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Applications for the Charles E. Young Humanitarian Award, formerly 
known as the Chancellor \s Humanitarian Award, are available at these locations; 

Student and Campus Life - 1 104 Murphy Hall 

Community Service Commission Office - 408 Kerckhoff Hall 

Graduate Students Association Office - 301 Kerckhoff Hall 

Community Programs Office - 102 Men's Gym 

AAP Information Desk - 1209 Campbell Hall 

Center for Student Programming - 105 Kerckhoff Hall 

Ackerman Union Information Desk - Level A 

Financial Aid Office - A129J Murphy Hall 

Residence Halls - Resident Director's 0|Bces t 

Dean of Students - 1 206 Murphy Hall 



II 

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Fraternity and Sorority Relations - 1 18 Men's Gym 



COMPLETED APPLICATIONS SHOULD BE TURNED INTO THE 
CHANCELLOR'S OFFICE AT 2147 MURPHY HALL BY WEDNESDAY, 
FEBRUARY 18, 1998. 



H APPUCATiONS ARE DUE TODAY!!! 



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1000 

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4200 

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Fax:(310)20&O528 

OfficeHours 

Mon-Tliu: 9-4)0anM:30pm 
Fri: 9:00am-2:30i>m 



Rates 

Daily, up to 20 words $8.00 

...eactiadditionaiword 0.50 

Weeldy.iipto20words 27.00 

...each ddditionat word 1.50 

Monthly, up to 20 words 96.00 

...each additional word 5.00 

For Oiassifled Oiaplw ads. please see 
our rate card for vaiiable rate 
Information. 




DeadOnes 

CtaasHiMiUneAds: 

1 wori^g day Mon printing, 

at 12 noon. 

aassMM Display AdK 

2 wortdng days tMlbre printing, 

at 12 noon. 

Itiere are no cancellations after noon 
of the day before printing. 

Payment 

Please make chedcs payatrie te The 
UCLA OaHy Bruin." wa acceptVlsa, 
MastCaid. and Discover credit cards. 
Alow 5 wortdng d^ for mail payments. 



How to Write 
an Effective Ad 

• stall your ad with the nnerchandise you 
are aeOng. This iraKes K oasier for readers 
to quicWy acan tha adt and locate your 
items. 

• Always indude the price of your item. 
Ktany daeeilled readers simply do not 
respond to ada without prices. 

• Avoid at)t)reviations— mat(e you ad easy 
for readers to understand. 

• Place yourself In the reader's position. 
asi( what you would Ul«e to Know about 
the merchandiee. and irtdude that in the 
ad. Include such inlormation as brand 
names, colors and other specific 
descriptions. 



hwMUOA 



tOW<M»<iMi»ail>»Urt»w»l<>(«cai<OTlc«->noicygpHaiia w»W a ^ 



^ OiS^w»»thtASUCUCMW»urtc>aaMB«rth>« l iiiiii S g a iai»(<1^i«»^ _, „, 

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OBiniilRwAvy SMtot for curioRMvi vid It fiol 



on-Int li flfimd M 1 1 




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Mml OiMMieii, fri Stop Stady, 3SI7 
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• 12:10- 1 A) pa 




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Cat: 310-267-7020. 



Services 



5800 1-900 MWiban 
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Housing 



9400 Apartmanls far Rant 
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tar Ranll 
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FREE CASH GRANTS! 

College Schoiarehips. Business. Medical 
b«Hs. Never repay. Toll Free: 1-600-216- 
9000 Ext G-1650. 

NEED CASH??- earn $1 .000 per rrxxith P/T 
from domrt/apt. dear up tchooi tNlls txlore 
yoiu graduate. 1-888-270-1994 

RAISE tSOO In one week Furxjraiaing op- 
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Great for ckitM. For more information caN: 
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UNION 

UCLA STUDENTS, faculty and staff: benefrt 
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line at ¥invw.ucu.org or call 310-477-8628 



TTSTT 



9000 Naiiaa for Rant 



Send yeor sUr; and 
appear in TV piiit. 

200 wds. or less about something 
unexplatnable that happened to 

you, i.e. touched by an angel type 

stories or story in the vain of 
Chicken Soup stones. Deadline: 
February 25th. Send attention: 
Stephanie fax: 818.99i.2024 
e-mail: youmagdearthiink.net 
*plea$e include: name, age and 
telephone #. Authors of stories 
chosen will appear io TV Dilof. 



appear in i v pii 



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"THE OMLY BfMN Haiyili NO RE- 


aPONOMUTY FOR AOMRfmCRS' OR 


CU9T0IKR8' PCrffRMilC 18 COWCERM- 

MO Aoe M THE PCRontALs accnoit. 




BODY WEIGHt&HOR- 
MONE LEVELS 

VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT Healthy young 
women, ages 17-25. weight between 
80&120l)6.. wMh nomial periods, to partici- 
pate in a UCLA project to lake 24hr8 
Receive $25.00 for complete participation 
Dr. Ian Ylp031 0-206- 1987 

NORMAL HEALTHY CHILDREf^ 8-12yr5 
needed for UCLA research study. Receive 
$25 for lab experiment and developmental 
evahitfon. and get a sderttific learning ex- 
perience. Call 310425-0392. 

PLAY GAMES AND 
MONEY, TOO! 

Social psychological experiment. 1 1/2- 
hours. Average 18. UndergraduHe only. CaH 
310-837-2869 or sign 14) 235 Haines. 

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED (M&F) 18-20 years 
o( age lor a study on bone heeMi. WiU re- 
ceive S60 plus free nutritionat, bone density 
and strength assessment, and comprehen- 
sive bkxxt analysis. Please call 0)e UCLA 
Osteoporosis Center at 310-825-6137. 



EGG DONORS! 
WANTED 

If you are a healthy 

female between 

the ages of 19 and 

30 and have health 

insurance. 

compensation 

Call Mirna Navas at 
(310) 



JT 



nUPINQ QR QHIN R E 

WOMEN NEEDED 

as anonymous egg donors. 

Ages 19-32. Egg donors find it 

emotionally rewarding to help 

anonymous Infertile couples. 

$40M compensation. 

Call l-aSMll-EGQS, Kellle 
Snell. Creative Conception. 



5L= 



Jt 




JEWISH EGG DONOR 

We are looidng for a Jewish egg donor Can 
you help us? If you can. caU 310-828-5788 

SPECIAL EGG DOfJOR NEEDEDI Loving 
infertile couple is hoping to r«nd a canipas- 
sionate woman to help us fwve a baby 
We're ftoping for sonieone who ftas blond or 
brown heir and blue eyes. We'd be delighted 
to find a healthy, intelligent, college student 
or graduate. Age 21-30 Thank you tor your 
consideration Compensation $3,500- 
$506o>expenses. If you can help us, please 
caU 1-800-686-9373 ext.6733 



_ //«« PIECES^ 

TOGETHERT: 



Are you or is someone you know \S+ yean old and suffering from Anxiety? You 
nuy quaHfy for an Important medical research study If your ^mptoms Indude: 

Q Excessive Wbny 

- - - . Q Feeling Tense or Irritable 

Q Difficulty Concentrating 
Qualified participants may receive up to $t004W. 



At CaWonla OWcal IHals. a premier research tadHty, we are focused on tesdng 
medications ttut oouid poislt>ly Improve lives arKi lead to future medical break- 
throughs. QuaMed partidpants will receive quality care from our research staff, a 
free basic physical exam and lab tests. Enrollnient Is limited. Be part of the solution 
and call now. 

TOUREE 
1'888-CC'TRIAL * . 

(l-tt8-22t-742S) 

Caufornia Clinical Trials 




LAP TOP COMPUTER 

kflAC &300SERIES. Brand New. $1800 
OBO. 310-3800627. 

PENTIUH^ 200 MMX. 32RAM. 4 3HD, 
6X4C0. 33.6, 14-Inch SVGA. 80W Speak- 
ers. Win 95. All latest adobe Via Voice. Tons 
more. $1100.310^3-5101. 



BWtare 



Ji 




ANOHYMOUS aperm donors needed. Help 
mtartto oou^lee whHe receMng financial 
companeaMon up to 960Q/monlh and free 
heaNh screening Convenient hours. kxMNed 
In Weaxyood. Ca» Mate 310-624-6641 

EGG DONORS NEEDED 



hiave you oonaidarad 
couple? H you're 21-30 years and wAng fo 
help. plaMa cal. AM races needed. Compan- 
salion $3,500.00. OPTIONS 600-668-0373 



EQQ DONORS/SURROGATES NEEDED 
Ages 21-30. All info confidential. Please caH 
3 10-265-0333 

FILIPINO OR CHINESE WOMEN NEEDED 
as anonymous egg donors. Ages 19-32. Egg 
donors find It amolionaliy rew ar ding to help 
anonymous mtarHla oouplas. Prooadura is 
scAaduM around Spring Break, but you 
muat attond ortanlaflon now. $4,000 oonv 
pensallon. Call 1 -666-411 -EOOS, KaUie 
Snal. CraaMve Concaptfdn. 



MATTRESS BONANZAIt 

SEALY.STEARNS4FOSTER. Also Orthope- 
dk: twin-set8-$99 95. Futls-$159.95, 
Oueens-$1 79.96. Kkigs-$229 95 Futona- 
$139.05 We deliver Beacon KAattraaa 
1308 Westwood Blvd. 310477-14 



MATTRESS SETSfl! 

Twin $79. FuH $69, Queen $139, l^ing $159, 
Bgnkbeds Deliveries. Phone Orders Aooapl- 
ed 310-372-2337 

QUEEN-SIZE BED Unused, stored caiefuT 
hr, good quality. MaM i s i i. box, and frame. 
$150. Can daHvar. 3iO«22-3264. 



Daily BnttflOassHied 



— yy . ' ifL ■.'rTr ^«.''.".?. vr-*T^ *" 

Wednesday, Febniary 18, 1998 23 




STARS CAROL BRUNETT. Roma Downey, 
and John Dye Reveal tfw key elements in 
becoming a professk)nal actorl Order the 
vWeo The Actor's Success Factor" now! 
www.gravityret)el.com or caH 435-655-7552. 




^ Piano Rentals ^ 

If Low Monthly Rdtes "^ 
^HoNywood Piar>o Rental Cornpan^ KTIMI 

iifwwififwiriri JHnrelTloiiets 




GREAT . ■ 

LA to Orlando or Fort Lauderdale $200ea. 

212-946-1173. 

LOW AIRFARES Domestic & Intematkinal 
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READ MY LIPSIII 

You can make $4800 in 

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money In your pocket 

FAST! riot MLM or chain 

letter. For free Info call 

Macro Enterprises 

1-888-510-4549 



Los Cabos iU8 

Honolulu i215 

London $370 

Pans :p398 



-FUES ARE aOUNO TKir, DO NOT INCLUDE TAXES. 

MSTwniow Amy. csniiooMwo-M 




ij 10904 Lindbrook Olive 

It Los Angeles 

r (310) 208-3551 





for Sale 



1986VWSCIROCCO 

Wen maintained, silver-bhie. 10SK, runs 
good, akjminum rims, new dulchAtires, car 
phone Asking $1700. Must see. 310-478- 
8828. 



1966 TOYOTA SUPRA TURBO, automatk;. 
w/targa (op Pearl white w/burgundy leather 
Kenwood CD&alarm. Mint conditk>n, new 
turbo/brakes. $8496 Davk) 213-933-9033. 

1989 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC, 
four-door, original owner, 58,000 miles, 
whMe. excellent oondikxi, $3,975. 310-474- 
0555. 

1990 ACURA irfTEQRA. 69.000 miles, ex- 
oelent conditkxi. great stereo, alarm. Ohgi- 
nal owner. $6,000 ot>o. Trey. 9-5 (818)502- 
5600. 

1992 RED CAVALIER Z24 CONVERTIBLE 
White automatic top/interior Automatk:. k>ad- 
ed. One owner, immaculate corx)rtlon. Only 
40,000 milesl $9500 obo 310-471-5326. 

88 TOYOTA MR42. Must sell. 5-spe«d. AC, 
sunroof, extras. Super dean! $3,950 otx>. 
CaU Stephen, 818-504-1177. 

SEIZED CARS FROM 
$175!! 



^^W.9mKm^ 



SPRING BREAK!!!! 

ROSARITO BEACH MEXICO. Hotel pack- 
ages $34Aup. 1-688-P1CANTI Space limit- 
ed 





services 






5800-7300 






Porsches, CedMos, Chevys, BMWs, Cor- 
vettes. Also Jeepe, 4-Wheel Drives. Your 
Area ToU-Pree 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A- 1650 
for current listings. 

SEIZED CARS from $175. Porsches, CadH- 
lacs, Chevys. BMWs. Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 
4W0's Your Area Toll-Free 1-800-218-9000 
Ext. A-16S0 for current listings 

'89 JEEP WRANGLER 4 2 8cyl HT, 35" 
tires. 5' Rancho suspensk>n. $7500 obo 
JaimeO310-824-4953. Pgr 888-9279 

'89 TOYOTA CELICA 

QT CONVERTIBLE; Great tow mileage car 
(79.000 miles), A/C. P/W, P/S. AM/FM case- 
tte. red^Mack top and interior, new tires 
alarm. $7,500. Call Maklie Woric 310-319- 
5490 Home: 310-573-0129 Fun carl 

'94 VOLKSWAGON JETTA GL. 5 speed. Ex- 
cellent condition $8990 Please cal! 
ZalnO310-477-6612. 



$CASH FOR COLLECES 

GRANTS & SCHOLARSHIPS avail from 
sponsors'll Great opportunity. Call now: 1- 
800-532-8890 

STUDENT LOANS 

Choose University Credit Unk>n to fund your 
Stalford Loans (Lender Code 832] 23) Also 
receive low-cost financial servk:es 310- 
477-8628; http;//www.ucu org 




INSURANCE WAR! 

WELL BEAT ANYONES price or dont want 
your business. All drivers, f^ewly licensed. 
Student/stalt/lacuNy discounts. Request the 
-Bruin Plan." 310-777-8817 or 213-873- 
3303 




1 988 HONDA ELITE 1 SOcc. Red, mint condi- 
tion basket $350obo Call Paul at 626-237- 
9721 



/lllstatGf 

KmIVv la pood hands. 

Insurance Company 
(310)312-0204 

1281 Westwood Btvd. 
C2 biks. So. or Wtlet-ilf ) 




FREE FOOD/ENT. 

— http://www.thelaweb com Los Angeles' 
HOTTEST internet night gutde to DINING, 
ENTERTAINMENT, and EVENTS Enter the 
SWEEPSTAKES and win. 




SPEAK SPANISH FAST! 

Central Mexk:o. Live with family Four 
week8-S875: 5classes/day. room&board. 
CALMECAC. Calixto 2. Guanajuato, Gto 
36000 MexKo. rTK>dem560quijote.ugto.mx. 




ALONE-STRESSED-OVERWHELMED 

Supportive, confidential counseling Anxiety. 
depression, relatranships Hypnotherapy for 
test preparation. Individuals, couples West- 
wood Village. Carole Chasin MA, MFCC. 
310-289-4643. 




BANKRUPTCY 

Chapter 7/11/13. GET OUT OF DEBT TO- 
DAY!!! Flat fee/low cost/payment plans. 
Law otfces of White & Assoc (UCLAW "86") 
800-420-9998/31 0-207-2089. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

FOR WORKS VISAS and green cards call 
experienced immigratk>n attorney. Reason- 
able rates and free consuJtattons. Call 213- 
251-9588 for attorney Doreen. 

GREEN CARD!The Easy-Inexpensive WAYI 
Visas, Wortt Penults, & Labor Certifteatkxi. A 
California Corporatton Since 1982. Immi- 
gratton Specialiat. CaH: 310-459-9200. 




BEST MOVERS 213-263-2378 Lteensed, 
insured Lowest rates Fast, courteous, and 
careful. Many students moved for $98. Uc.- 
T- 163844 NO JOB TOO SMALL! 

HONEST MAN W/14fl tmck and doilies, 
small jobs, shod notue ok. Student discount. 
310-285-8688. SF. LV. SD, AZ. Go Bruins. 

JERRYS MOVING & DELIVERY The care- 
ful movers. Experierx^d, reliable, same day 
delivery. Packing, boxes available. Jerry, 
310-391-5657 GO UCLA!! 




DRUM LESSONS 

All levels/styles with dedk^ted professkxtaJ. 
At your home or WLA studkt. 1 st lesson free 
No dnjm set necessary. Neil 213-654-8226 

GUITAR INSTRUCTION. 15 years EXP an 
levels and styles. Patient and organized. 
Guitars availabie Sam 310-826-9117. 



GUITAR LESSONS by profasskxwl 
UCLA. Al levels, guitars avail CaH Jean at 
310-476-4154. 

LEAST EXPENSIVE guitar lessons. $13/hr. 
my home or $23/hr your home. Aoous- 
t)c&electric Jules: 310-398-2480. 

THE BETTER PIANO LESSONS- Jazz & 
Ciasswal Musk- European Instructor- Inler- 
natkjnal teaching experience. AH Ages/Lev- 
els. Leave menage at: 31O-307-3012 

V0K:E LESSONS Eastman grad. 10-years 
European operatic experience. Free the 
beat^ of your voice through good vocal 
technk)ue $4Q^r 310-470-6549. 

mSUSSSSSSSSm 

TEXT ANXIETY 

MidTerms, Finals, GRE, MFCC. LCSW. 
MCAT, LSAT. Bar CaH: Fay Shatzkin, C.H: 
Clinical Hypnotherapiel 310-330-8851 







SgnrtcCT 



ATTN: MBA, LAW, 
MED. APPLICANTS 

Frustrated devetoping/editing your critcaHy- 
important personal statements? Get profes- 
stonal help, competitive edge from na'k>rfal- 
ly-known author/consultant. 310-828-4445 

JAPANESE CONVER.SATION CLASS Sart- 
ta Monica Col«ge. Business and travel 
Starting Feb 28'f/Vpril 25. Six Saturdays. 
9am- 12pm $75 Participation encouraged. 
310-452-9214. . _,^_,_^^ 

PRIZE-WINNING 

ESSAYIST AND FORMER PROFESSOR 
w/two Ph Ds can help you produce winning 
prose. Theses, papers, personal statements. 
Davkl 310-281-6264. 805-646-4455 




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TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Machine part 
4 Out of danger 
8 Captures, in 

checkers 
13 Invasion 
15 Domain 
16"AKla"or 
"Carmen" 

1 7 Ivy League 
school 

18 Sarxlbar 

19 Type of child? 

20 Colorado city 

23 A single time 
only 

24 Do an ushers 
job 

27 WHddog 

29 Actor Greene 

30 Electhcal 

32 Away from the 
wind 

33 Pale 

34 l»^ledicaltool 
37 Hairdresser's 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 



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BSD asms □sssisa 



Fl I IGIUIRIEISIOIFISIPIEIEICIHI 



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CDBQESaS QCQBO SQB 

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BSQS SaQS QESDBS 
SQSCl [sJSClS □□do 



Ol** 

**• 

»*. 

*• 

NO" 

01* 

»*« 



38 *Carx>e' trees 
40 Pep 
42 Chars 

44 Young boy 

45 Nevada city 

46 Ate to k>se 
weight 

48 Soirth American 
dance 

49 Dairy food 

51 Gan^bler 

52 Go to tt>e man 

53 Barge pusher 
56 *— of Five" 

58 Small group 

59 Iowa town 

63 Bride's 
walkway 

64 Hardwoods 

65 Moniker 

66 Low cards 



67 Yeltsins "no" 

68 Place 

DOWN 

1 Sob 

2 Battery size 

3 Wire nneasure 

4 Swagger 

5 "The Clan of 
the Cave Bear^ 
author 

6 Barney's buddy 

7 Result 

8 Chore 

9 Removes 



lOIr 

11 Fee 

12 Rational 
14 Fillet 

21 Crude metal 

22 Moved on 
wheels 

24 Spirit 

25 Foot parts 

26 Greek island 
28 Team cf>eers 

T 



30 Long pole 

31 —Sam 

33 Most sensible 

35 Happenino 

36 Beatie — Stan 

38 Soft ripe 
cheese 

39 Possessed 
41 Anctxjr 

43 SIdlNulty 
45 WickenMor1( 

47 ArKient 
German 

48 Hot or iced 
beverage 

49 Seat 

50 Draft animal 

51 Lift 

52 Argunr>ent 

54 Neutral color 

55 Two-wt>eeler 
57 Vote in favor 

60 Traveler's 
guide 

61 Flightless 
bird 

62 Matcfied pair 



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Classifieds 
8252221 



Bruins gel 20% off private party Classified advertising. Just show/ us your Student/Facully/Staff I.D. card. 



Displa* 
206-30r 



24 Wednesday, February 18, 1998 




RESEARCH. EDITORIAL. Word Processing, 
and oomplele resume services. 213-444- 
2033 



Debt Consolidation. Auto Loans. 

Low Interest. Bod credit. 

Bankruptcies Accepted. 

Emplovment Required. 

Fast Resbor«e on Approved 

Applications. 

1-888-281-5110 



IMMIGRATION. Wort Pcmits. Gfoen 
Cards, Citizenship, Investor Visas... 

Angel vsa center- 

Reasonably Priced, Reliable, Efficient 
Immigration Service. For Free 
Coankadoa Call: 310-478-2899. 

Coofidentiality Guaranteed. 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 



nsnorw SMmmli, ncfKMli and Booiis. 



8l>eron»wr,PlvD.(810)47»il8a 




PROFESSIONAL 
RESUMES 

ORDER BY PHONE 213-777-9885. or call 
mobile unit direct, 818-697-4028 Pager: 
213-344-7581 http //www.online 
labs.corTi/danrw/fea/in dex.htm 

WINNING RESUMES 1-hour service. Our 
clients gel results Open 7 days. Visa and 
Mastercard accepted. 310-287-2785. 




SJAPANESE TUTOR graduated untveralty in 
Apan. If you would like to learn Japanese at 
^ftrdable rates, please call to dtoouss. 310- 
83 A4891. 

MATH TUTORING/CONSULTING by Ptl.D. 
Chemistry. Physics, English. Elementary thni 
graduate school. Po«t-Ph.D. WLA. 310-398- 
0693. 

PRIVATE TUTOR $25/hr. avoid high agency 
costs Most subjects. aH grades. Specialize 
in (writing and LSAT Call Melante 031 0-442- 
9565 

PRIVATE TUTORING 

SECONDARY. PRIMARY LEVEL All acade- 
- tfic sut^boGk Plus SAT. At your home. Afford- 
able rates! Call Adntiral TutonngO 31 0-477- 
5685 

UCLA ENGLISH ALUMNI, pro-writer, young, 
superb papers guaranteed. High school arnl 
below welcome Jeff 213-653-2240 

WRITING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Stanford University 
graduale. Help with English— for students of 
all agMtavets. $15/hr 310-472-8240 or 
310-44(M)285 




10+YRS EXPERIENCE 

Word Processing. Transcription. Resumes. 
Application Typing, Editing, Notary 4 More! 
Legal/Medical-Mac/IBM Student Discount 
Near UCL A. 310-312-4658. 

ALL WP & RESUMES 

RESUME DEVELOPMENT APPLICA- 
TIONS, LETTERS EDITING/PROOFREAD- 
ING. FORMATTING DISSERTATION/THES- 
ES. DISCOUNT FOR PAPERS RUSHES 
ACE AWARDS, ETC 310-820-8830. 

DESIGNER'S ORIGINAL- Word Prooesaing 
Services; Tape Transaction, Buainess 
Letters, Journals. Scnpts. Term Papers, Re- 
ports Student Discounts. 24-hours. (310) 
777-0683. Tshtone 



Daily Bruin Classified 




An Evening Working 
with Ernst & Young LLP 



when: Wednesday, February 18th 



''*^-^i'^ 



Where: Covel Commons - West Coast/South Bay Rooms 



6:MTM, 
Casual^ 



rKme: 
Attire? 

Please ioin reores 



j^-^' 



^"A,. 





r^^'"-'-'^"^^": 



r 



i 



'Ai» >■'*»-. 



^lease join representativcsirgjii the firm for sih interactive evening where you 
will experieni6fe ^hat we do firsthihd! A reception with bfeyeragcs iild snacks 
willlolldW. 



"v^r- 



We look forward to meeting you at the event! — — — ^ 

Please RSVP your attendance through the Student Accounting Society. 



sU Ernst aYounc llp 




WORD PROCESSING tpaciaHzIng bf ttia*- 
es. dissertations, trartacr^plion, resumes. Ni- 
ers. brochures, nwiling Ksls. reports. Santa 
Monica. 31O-828-6930. Hotywood. 213-466- 
2868 



WORD PROCESSING Typing, proofing, 
editing, rewriting, research, transcnption, 
elc. Fax. emaH, maM, bring worV to me. 
Rushes. Student disoounL 818-830-1546 




employment 




7400-8300 



FANTASTIC! 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 1yr P/T mini- 
mum investment. Can earn you S. $600- 
$2.000f/mo. 24-HR message. 800-468- 
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MAKE 2000% PROFIT 

SELLING -HOW-TO^ Informrtion by mail 
Reprint rights to 750 Books, reports, manu- 
als Free info-pack 1 -600-466-%22, ext 
7891.24hrs. 



mfARKEIING 

Immed, P/T Pos avail 

for Westside Co. 
Easy Sales; Salary -»- 

Comm. DAILY 
CASH! Fun office. 

310.479.6689 



TUTORS ON TAPE 

Videotapes for tbe: 

Ls 1 1, (;ui:, i;Mi\ 

(800)832-3335 

V^Ww.Tutoi-^OnT.ipe.COn) 



OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS Parttime 
Ma^or network marketing company Join out- 
standing learn. $99 wlH get you started. CaH 
Roben Schaen-818-99<}-7401. 

WANTED: Two or three friends to form a 
management team and devekjp our trade- 
mark line oH apparel (initially T-shirts) Cur- 
rent owners have received a strong re- 
sponse in 'early stage' testing These own- 
ers, however, (an attomey& money manager) 
do not have the time to try to advance this 
entreprer>eunal opportunity (also we're in 
Chicago and it wouW fit better to begin on the 
beach). Give us an idea of how smart you 
are and ^tAi^itm you have the drive to make 
this succeed. Polentiai tor equity is included 
in this package. Send replies to: UbWo 
Sports. 2705 N Bosworth Ave , Chicago. IL 
60614 




MAKE $1500+ WEEKLY 



working ONLY 4hrs a day. 

No college degree 

or experience needed. 

Not MLM or chain letter. 

For free info call 
M.L ENTERPRISES 
at 1-888-510-4548 



s 



ATTORNEY NEEDED TO help recover 
unpaki insurance claim in a maior personal 
injury case. Fee negotiable. 213-874- 2569. 

TEACHER ASSTNTS 

PVT. WLA School tooWng for capable and 
experienced teacher assistants to work vi^ 
elementary level students. M-F. SAM- 1PM. 
Begin 02/23/96 Call: 310-476-2868 Ask for 
Mr. Nastri. 




TAKE CARE OF your cNM in my o«*n apt. 
S400/mo 9-5 RegMsrsd nurse. Wealwood 
area. 310-575-3532. 



CbLSifieds 
825-2221 



Advertise fur FREE in Bruin Bargains Items $100 or les«J Print's pvpry Wednesay and Friday 



Display 
2063060 



Dally Bniin Classified 



Wrdnnday, February 18, 1998 25 





CARING RESPONSIBLE BABYSITTER 
NEEDED. Help out working rrK>m Pick up 
9/yo-twin8 from Beverly Hills school Help 
w/homework. Must have own carAraMd driv- 
ers Hcense/references. Call 310-284-8974. 

FATHERS HELPER P/T on Weekends. 
Assist w/girls 6 and 10 Do activities wAhem. 
Computer literate. Must have own car. 310- 
553-7337. 

MALE PREFERRED to live-in. use own car. 
own apartment Boy 11 -yr. near beach. 
IBM/PC knowledge. Athletk:, non-smoking, 
1-yr convnitment. 310-822-2228. ^ 

NANNY afternoons and some evenings. 
valW drivers license, great references re- 
quired. About 32hrs/wk. flexible hours. WLA 
Easy krts. 310-836-8189 

PART-TIME STUDENT to care for 3 chlMren 
in Pacific PaNaades. Must speak English and 
drive. Approx. 30 hours/week. 809-569- 
581^ 

PARTTIME SITTER. Mon. Wed. and/or Fri 
for 2 and half yr-okVboy. Experience, kwal 
references, and CDL required. 310-454- 
7490. 



$1Q00'S 

POSSIBLE 

TYPING 

Part-time. At home. Toll free: 1-800-218- 
9000 ext. T-1650 for listings 

**rtECEPTIONIST** 

F/T OR P/T POSITION AVAILABLE Energe- 
tk:. artk;ulate. professkjnai, nk:e attitufle. 
Needed M. W. F or M-F Dental Orthodontk: 
offce in WLA and Irvine. With excellent sal- 
ary and benefit. Pleaae caN: 310-826-7494 

A LAW FIRM 

WESTWOOD-Flexible hours Learn a tot 
$7,504'. Good typing stalls, computer liter- 
ate, excel experience preferred. Call 310- 
475-0481 Resumes preferred 3 10-446- 
9962. 

ADMIN ASST 10-20 hrs/wk lor data entry, 
filing & general admin Fax resume:31 0-247- 
1707/mail POB 5150. Bev Hills 90209. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT with ac- 
counting and computer skills. PT Flexible 
hours Pacifk: Palisades We are natkxial 
ftower shippers. 310-231-0811. 

ADMINISTRATIVE. Approximately 22hrs/wk, 
avenings&Saturday mornings Scheduling, 
accounts receivable, phone traiftc Bilingual 
Spanish. $6 50+ Contact 'Coco: 310-479- 
8353 

ATHLETIC ATTITUDE 

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING FIRM seek- 
ir>g strong, motivated Individuals to fill leader- 
ship and management posftk)ns. Excellent 
pay. FT/PT 310-348-9900 

BARTENDER TRAII4EES NEEDED Earn 
up to $2Q/hr, day/eve classes, 1-2 week 
classes. 310-973-7974. International Bar- 
ter>der's sctxx)!. 

BASEBALL! 

ASSIST BASEBALL COACH NEEDED- for 
9-11year okjs, 1-2 hrs 3 days/wk Must be 
able to throw batting practne Mike 0310- 
843-9033. 

CAD OPERATOR: architectural offce has 
P/T positton Must know auto cad 14 and 
word-processing Fax resume:3 10-453- 
6419 or call 310-453-3335. 2932 Wllshire 
Blvd Santa Monica 

CAMPUS JOBS 

UCLA STUDENTS WANTED!! Front 
desk/customer service agent at ttie UCLA 
Tiverton House Hotel WORK 15- 
20HRS/WK $7 75/HR+ 32SHIFT DIFFER- 
ENTIAL. WE WILL WORK AROUND YOUR 
SCHOOL SCHEDULE WE ARE OPEN 
24HRSI APPLY AT 900 TIVERTON AVE.. LA 
90024. PHONE 310-794-0151 FAX 310- 
794-8503 

CAMPUS SAFETY OFFICER Mount St. 
Mary's College. 3pm- 11pm or 5pm -1am 
$6/hr to start 310-541-7775. 

CARETAKER Look after 76yr oW man Ex- 
erdee. take to pool. Must drive w/insurarwe. 
P/T Starting at $» Fax resume: 310-479- 
2402 

. CASTING 

IMMEDIATELY! Extras needed for feature 
Mma, oonvnerciais. and music vkleos. Earn 
up ID 1340 per dayl No eiipertenoe needed 
Work guaranteed! CaH today 213-851-6103. 

COMPUTER/TELECOM 

Fast growing Inlemel company kx>klng lor 
cuMWMr service reps. Part-time 6am- 10am 
M^, apm-nMnight M-F Friday&Saturday 
poMHsna tor midnight to Sam or aN hours. In- 
dudN phone sales and lech support. Com- 
puter saperienoe preferred In Westwood, 
minutes from campus RuerKy In FrerKh. 
German or Spanieh a plus. Fax resume: J 
Rowtands 310-966-1602 



COMPUTJER. SUPPORT. Software support 
Wln97 NT Experience w/Access database. 
MS word. Salary negotiable. 20+ hrs/wk 
310-208-244?. Fax resume: 310-208-2621 

COVEL COMMONS Is hiring responsible 
students for meeting room set-up crew Must 
enjoy customer service Some lifting. 
$6.77/hr. 15-20hrs/wk. Call Felcia at 310- 
206-2842 to apply. 

CSO PROGRAM 

NOW HIRING. Posittons start at $7 18/hr 
with promotkxts up to $9.47/hr Must be a 
UCLA student with at least one academk: 
year remaining and a valid driver's license 
Call 310-825-2148 for details 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

P/T posittons at University Credit Unton. Ex- 
cellent pay. hours, arxl wortcing environment 
at the financial Institutwn 8ervir>g UCLA. To 
apply, fax resun>e to 310-477-2566 or on 
web at www.ucu.org 

DOG LOVERS NEEDED 

Urt>an dog playcare & training is now hiring 
tor day and evening shifts. 310-445-1447. 

ESTABLISHED DOG WALKING/PET SIT- 
TING servce Is tooking for quality people to 
assist on daily walks. Please be responsible, 
flexible and tove animals! If interested, call 
Tracy O 213-936-9387 

FILE CLERK NEEDED for Architectural finn. 
Organized person for 20-30 hours/wk $7.00- 
8.50/hr. Resumes to Box 1211. 11301 Olym- 
pc Blvd.. #121 LA. CA 90064. 

FILE CLERK 

P/T. fast-paced. WLA medteal offce. Filing 
medical records, x-rays, and general duties. 
Fax resume 310-286-2710 attn Kay 

FUN SUMMER JOBS! Gain valuable experi- 
ence workir>g with chiklren outdoors We are 
looking for fun, caring. Summer Day Camp 
staff whose summer home is In the San Fer- 
nando or Canejo Valley. Vantura. Camarilto. 
Malibu. or Simi Valley. Summer salaries 
range from $2,100-3.200+ Call 818-865- 
6263 or email us at CampJobsOaol com 

GENERAL OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 

Irrunediate position available. Century City 
investment banking firm Must work Thurs- 
daysiFridays. 8am-5pm witfwut exception 
Punctual, computer literate, responsible, 
dedcated, prolessiorul. hard-worklr>g. and 
detail-oriented Previous offce experience 
preferred. $8/hr. Fax resurT>e:310- 788-5572. 
all Sheri or Llli 

GIRLS WANTED at exclusive social dub In 
West LA Conversatton only Flexit>le hours 
Start tonight, earn top $$$. 310-477-9871 

HELPER NEEDED to do bookkeeping/office 
work. Must know computers. Good organlza- 
ttonai skills Flexible hours Culver City 
$7/hr+ 310-390-1240. 310-558-4255 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC USERS NCEDED. $45,000 Income po- 
tential Call: 1-800-513-4343 Ext B-10105 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed $45,000 income potential 
Call 1-800-513-4343. Ext B-10105. 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed S45.000 Income potential 
Call 1-800-513-4343 Ext B-10105 

I NEED HELP In my offce. Busy phones. 
Part time. Good pay for the right person 
Language experience plus. 310-475-5556 

INTL. CO. 

NEEDS help lnrwT>ediateiy Rapidly expar>d- 
Ing. No experierKe necessary Full training 
P/T $500-2000 F/T $3000-6000 310-470- 
6664 

JOIN THE MUSIC MARKETING TEAM. Cut- 
ting-edge company kx>kir>g tor student work- 
ers who know the LA music scene and sur- 
roundings like the back of their hand' If you 
have wf>eeis. are motivated, and like getting 
free CD's, corxrert tckets. and pronra stuff. 
tax your resume to 21 2-960-7508 or email to 
rrKtoOdti.neL 

KAPLAN 

SALES-Smart. ambitious. energetK people 
for our Educatk>r>al Sales Departnrtenl B/A. 
1-year experience in saiea/marketing, serv- 
we-orientad, enlhrived in fast-paced working 
erwirofwnent. Fax cover arnj resume attn: 
DW 310 -209-2025 

LASER TECHNK^IAN tor laser hair rentoval 
company In BH. RN or PA (or soon-to-be 
graduate) Friendly. detail-oner>ted. wiH tram. 
$18-$2S/hr. 310-247-0999. 

LE BEACH CLUB 

AMERICA'S FAVORITE TANNING resort is 
expar>ding&has Hmitedeof FT openings tor 
motivated, outgoing, tannlnf^salas consult- 
ants Pos are limited so call now&join LE 
BEACH CLUB, the Very Best Contact Carol 
310-704-8834. 

LIVE IN WANTED to assist with daily activi- 
ties for a healthy 86-yr/oM wktow Santa Mo- 
nwa area. Must have car. 310-587-9244. 



Ciassilieds 
825-2221 



CLERK/HtCbPllONIijI. hull-lime lor small 
busy law firm in Beveriy Hills Great hands- 
on experience! $7/hour. Resume: PO Box 
18143 Beveriy Hills. CA 90209 Or 
emalhbevhillslawOearthlink.net 



MARKETING INTERN. J. Peterman Compa- 
ny, a nattonal retail/direct mail catatog. is 
tooking for a marketing Intern. P/T. paki posi- 
tk>n. 15-20hrs/wk. Please call Brlna0213- 
938-6900. 

MCAT 

BIOLOGICAL and phystoal sciences semi- 
nars In March. July, and August/ 1998 1-800- 
305-4415. huntdOcc.umanitotM.ca 

MEN-WOMEN AGES 18-26 for nude model- 
ing for magazines, fine art and Videos. Call 
31 0-289 -8941 days. 

MODELS WANTED by professtonal photo- 
studto for upcoming assignment Male/Fe- 
male Pro/Non-Pro. Fashlon/Commer- 
cial/Theatrk:al. CaH for appointment 818- 
986-7933. 

MOVIE EXTRA WORK 

REVOLUTIONARY NEW PROGRAM! Start 
right away! AH types- 18f! Fun/Easy! No cra- 
zy fees! Program for free medcal! CaN- 
24/hrs 213-850-4417. 



NATIONAL PARK 
EMPLOYMENT 

Work in the great outdoors. Forestry. wiW life 
preserve. concesstonaires. tlretight- 
ers&rrwre Competitive wages-i^rtefits. Ask 
us how! 517-324-3110 Ext. n59342 

OFFICE ASSISTANT Nutrittonal educatton 
helpful Flexible days 16/hrs-wk. $7/hr. Fit- 
ness/nutrition firm. Venwe Fax 310-396- 
7980 



OFFICE ASSISTANT 
15hrs/week. 3 days a 
$8.50/hr 310-209-3381. 



Part-time. 12- 
flexit)le. 



OFFICE ASSITANT 

Needed lor martteting director P/T or F/T 
Must have knowledge in MS Word/Excel 
Fax resume to 310-338-3610. 

PART-TIME LEAGUE 
COORDINATOR 

SPORTS-ORIENTATED, fun. reliable people 
needed to wori( at adult sports leagues. Must 
t>e 21 yrs or older. Interns also needed Call 
for intennew and wage into. 310-376-0025 

PERMANENT F/T FILE CLERK-$8/hr. Uton- 
Fri. 9am-5:30pm. Small immigratkjn law firm 
in Century City Computer literate, good 
phone skills, file, phones Position includes 
all other job related duties. Begins ASAP 
310-553-6600 or fax-310-553-2616. 



PERSONAL TRAINER. Phys-ed major— pri- 
vate training opportunity. 5 days/week. M-F. 
6am start. $500/month Fax informatton: 
310-476-7976. 

PRODUCTION COMPANY just completed 
first film seeks scripts for next feature pro- 
ject. Contact Alex Gayner031 0-396-3828 or 
Steve Adelson031 0-306-2852 for more In- 
formation 

PRODUCTKDN CREW needed Somewhat 
experienced for ambitious short film: 
wardrot>e, props. AD, editor, make-up, and 
more Send Resume 25852 McBean 
Paritway #183 Valencia. Ca 91355 

PT DRIVERS/WAITERS 
WANTED 

FLEXIBLE HRS. GREAT wort</people. Driv- 
ers/waiters wanted- Pizza Hut Contact 
Nathan: 310-208-0900. 

PT GENERAL OFFICE 

OFFICE/MAILCLERK-mailing. copying, fil- 
ing, phones, for large synagogue $7.0((Vhr 
Permanent/Parttime. 1-5pm Mon-Fri. 
Please fax resume to Wilshire Blvd Temple 
213-388-2595 or call Yvette 213-388-2401. 

PT OFFICE ASSISTANT wanted by family- 
run real estate management company. Must 
be extremely organized, computer llter- 
ate&reiiable. Great working environ- 
ment/flexible hours. $8/hour 213-850-5726. 




-Silicon 
Systems will be 

On 
Campus 

February 17th & 25th 
for Literviews 

Stop by Silicon Systems' table and see what the 
industry's top dog has in store for new grads in: 

• Engineering 

• Marketing ""■ ^ 

• Information Systems 

Silicon Systems is a Texas Instruments Company 
that designs and manufactures integrated cir- 
cuits for the mass storage industry. We have 
excellent opportunities in Orange County, Santa 
Cruz and San Jose, CA; Longmont, CO; and 
Dallas. TX. 



ENGINEERING ROTAnON PROGRAM 

Silicon Systems offers new grads the chance 
to rotate through three different engineering 
areas your first 18 months. 

This unique program: 

• lets you experience how a variety of areas 
actually work 

• gives you a broader view of how the whole 
company operates 

• lets you make a more informed decision on 
your career direction 



JTT 



1. ' -:;=_ 



■'/^:^-«S* ■. 



Silicon Systems offers competitive compensation 
and excellent benefits. If you are unable to visit 
with us on campus, please mail or fax (in fine 
nrade for scanning puiposes) your resume to: 
Silicon Systems, Staffing Dept B-60, 14351 
Myford Road, IXistin. CA 9^80-7068, Job Code: 
UIAF217. FAX: (714) 573-6901, E-mail: 
stafifing^tus^l.com (ASQI text onl^ 

Visit our website at: wnvmssiLoom 



mm^/dm 



A T«xas Instrumanta Company 

We are an equal opportunity emplofer, M/F/D/V 



More Bruins turn to tlie Daily Bruin ttian any otlier newspaper 



Display 
206 30( 



<aa 



fsssm 



k^- .i. .4a tCj^L* 



26 WedoKday,Fcbniary18,1998 



Daily BniinCbssifM 




UCLA Annual Fiinil 



$8.10/ HR. nMMmu 

(So -Timi. MHiRli. } iMIi w M. « Si» MHnoon) 

Contod CiflM Gonwi 
S1I-79M277 

1 083 Gayley Avmue. 4th floor. Westwood 
we are able to offer worfc study 



Models Needed Now 

No experience required 

For catalog, printwork, mag^ubnes. movies 

vWeo arid N commerciats 

Men and Women o( aN ages 

^Mi^ Free Consultation 

MHiillH^ CAU. MOOa DIVISION 

i^HSHr 310.659.4855 



WORK NOW! 

We're in the business of 
putting prof, people to 
work. Seeking the 
following skills: 

* Reception ♦ 

* Secretaries 

* Word Processors 
Wkly pay, flex, hrs, bonus 
and career opptys avail. 
Barrington Staffing Servioes 

310-453-3471 



RECEPTIONIST 

WEEKEND position with Law Firm. 9am- 
6pm Sat-Sun. Bilingual Spanish. Reception, 
data entry, filing. Computer literate. $15/hr. 
Fax resame 213-658-6041. 

RECEPTIONIST. Experienced, needed for 
new salon in Westwood. F/T. Please call 
310-206-7531. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANTS! 0/HR. Call 512- 
472-7225 , 

RETAIL SALES. Retail sales books. PT 
Children t>ook knowledge req. WLA. 310- 
559-2665. 

ATTRACTIVE, self motivated, wonien need- 
ed for lingerie modeling. No nudity Excel- 
lent compertsationl! Will not intertere w/stud- 
les ChrtetineOSI 8-545-8855 Ext 3 



STUDIO REPS NEEDED $7-$15/hr +bo- 
nuses P/T. No experience needed. Workirtg 
w/other students Great P/T / F/T work. 213- 
882-6844 

SUMMER CAMP X)BS Decathton Sports 
Club Palo Alto, CA S65-S80/day. 6/22-8/14. 
650-365-8638 

SURROGACY: Professional couple seeks 
woman to help them have a child through 
surrogacy $20,000. 800-450-5343. 

TEACHERS NEEDED 

to teach kkls computers, math, and science 
classes. ASAP. Hours 2-5pm. Experience 
wortting with kkls preferrlBd. Great pay. All 
applk:ants tax resume to: 310-445-5628. 

WAITER/WAITRESS/CASHIER wanted at a 
Japanese cafe in WLA Must be fluent in 
t»oth English and Japanese Call 310-477- 
9871 

WANT TO HAVE FUN ©WORK? Responsi- 
ble, enthusiastic and hardworking. Phys. Ed, 
ECE, chikt development majors apply. Kkls 
gym. Holly 818-343-1120. 

WANTED ASIAN 

PT WORK MASSAGE Great pay, flex hrs. 
Will work around your school schedule. 816- 
344-1294 

WE6 SITE DESIGNERS 

Full and part time, SIS/tKMjr-*^. HTML and 
graphic design. High-end clients, great ex- 
perience, leading design studio Apollo Inter- 
active 310-393-5373 

WE'RE SEEKING INDIVIDUALS to provide 
support to ttw devek>pmentally disabled. Call 
Dwight Istanbtilian at 818-361-6400 ext 129. 



INTL BUSINESS AND 
MARKETING 

EXPERIENCE&LEARN ALL aspects of infl 
twsiness, marketing, export, product devel- 
opment, operation&market research UnlNet 
Santa Monica s«eks intern for special pro- 
jects. PT, flexible hrs, possibility of intema- 
tkx^al travel. If you are motivated, organized, 
dependable, f)uerK:y in Japanese/German/ 
or Italian Fax your resume© 31 0-396-31 96 
attn:lnternship or call 310-396-859ey. 



1-BDRM$598ANDUP 
WLA/CHEV.HILLS 

QUIET, DELUXE, CLEAN, sequrity-buiWing. 
Gated-parkirtg. Refrigerator, stove. Carpet, 
laundry room. No pets. 310-838-6423. Call 
Bob 




UCLA Sports Camps 



FuU-Tunc ^0l3(VHR Musi be willing lo work 

overtime and wedamds. Experience witi» camps 

p te fe ne J . Customer service slullsftquired. 

Contact lulie Cliiu 

31<VM».3550 

InmcoUtgiMt AMMks 

PMiMsanOnMi 




housing 




8400-9500 



!• • PALMS • ■ 

2BO,2BA, 

CUSTOM TOWNHOUSE, RREPLAot, 

BALCONY. GATED GARAGE, 

ALARM IN UNIT 

• 3614 FARIS $1045 

(310)837-0906 

4BO,3BA., 

LOR. CUSTOM TOUKNHOME, FIREPLACE, 

GATED GARAGE AURM IN UNIT 

* 3640 WESTWOOD BLVD.$1795 

(310) 391-1076 

* MAR VISTA * 

480, 4BA 
GATED GARAGE , ALARM IN UNIT 
' t3K4BMtt)0VMSL$179S 

2B0,2BA, 2-STORY 

CUSTOM TOWNHOUSE, FIREPUCE, 

BALCONY, GATED GARAGE, 

ALARM IN UNIT 

• 11748 Courtleign Dr.$92S • 

, (310)391-1076 , 

— OpenHotiseMoo. -Sal, 10-5 ■■ 



BRENTWOOD $625. At studio-apt. W/pri- 
vate entrance, serious tenant only. N/S, N/P. 
Walk to village References necessary. 310- 
472-1869. . 

1BD-$675/SGL-$600 

WLA. GARDEN COURTYARD. Quiet, ap- 
pliarKes, blinds, etc. Bkie Bus. I.Smi to caNV 
pus Ava now 310-477-0725 

BRENTWOOD 

$725. Studio N. of Wiishire. SpackHJS, sun- 
ny-upper with separate kitchen, living room 
Walk-in ck)set. Relngerator, stove, air-condi- 
tioner Ck>se to UCLA. 11821 Goshen Ave., 
#7. 310-571-0293 



GENUINE UCLA 
S'^tCIALS 

oingics rrom b/^u-V ■': 

yilLiTiES INCLUDED 



. 



OFFICE/PRODUCTION ASSISTANT. 

Record Labei/Z^rtist Management company 
representing major artists. PtxxM/oomput- 
er/secretarial experience preferred. Ciose to 
campus. Unpaid but great experierwe. Flexi- 
ble hours 818-784-7782. 



PR INTERNSHIP 

Hollywood Madison group, a PR agency 
specializing in celebrity endorsemerits, is of- 
fering a non-paid 3mo internship. Require- 
ments: sophomore status, MAC proficient, 
15-20hr8/wk. Fax resume: 213-951-1750 



jjJPvliiNnis 



roriteoi 






BEVERLY HILLS ADJ. 1i2-BEDROOMS 
UPPER&LOWER $710-$925. ASK FOR 
BONUS. SOME W/HARDWOOD FLOORS, 
BALCONY ONLY 1/2 BLOCK TO PICO 
BUS. 310-839-6294 




Why run all over the place when you haw f:;e access to apartment listings here on ~ 
can^ws? looking for a place to live can be a ml drag, and ifs not like you've got al tha ■ 
time m the wotld so who wants to <fciw arouM with their head out the w indow trywtg to g 

are vou H 



read^typeon 
RENT' signs? 
supposed to 
apartment will 
Monica or 
Palms? arvJisit 
bus? wouktilM 
was an office on 
Icept track of all 
well maytte this 
day because 
housing does 
more you can 



UCLA STUDENTS: GET A FREE 

PRINTOUT OF APARTMENT 

LISTINGS (55 VALUE) 



ing This Ad & Your BruinCard 
(before 2/27/98) to: 

UCLA Community Housing 



ow are you < 

know what an | 

osl in Santa ■ 

iBrentwood or' 

Iclose to thai 

I great if ttwre H 

ampus that ^ 

tstuffaryou?" 

your lucky I 

:ommunity ■ 

III that and' 

look at apart- 1 



manlkstngs, or maybe you want to share a home wilt a aM>l*<Mni<> fnd a roommate- 1| 

cn-ineeran you know you h»«fraa access .ual this as a uda student you can swan — 

post l<<tmgs for free or pck up some bus sch-irfulas iust give us a cal at 825-M91 it ■ 

_ woukiil be a bad klaa to gel some info on ho»' to gel al of your sacuity deposit back | 

i either since the owly^thing gu naad more thar extra time, is extra money ■ 



laraain 



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PHONE: ■ ■■ ■- ■ 9 m 

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Pnce: $ (ex $25, $106ee, FREE Ptaase round to the nearest dolar) 

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Phone: t_J-. 



(ISchars. max., including spaces) 

. .^••.—,..,l....-<t.Z*.'-(20 chars, max., incfcxfng spaces) 
- (ex. $K,$105ea .FREE. Please round to the nearest dollar) 

-- ' COT 



2 UFT TICKETS 


vaUatSidSunrlM 


$1088 


310-475-3130 


2SK) LESSONS 


vgid at SM Sunrise 


SlOsa 


310-475-31X 


23rROADBIKE 


Cemurion 


$100 


310477-7333 


28.8 KBPS MODEM 


use bai.wil help 


310-288^172 


32-MEGEOORAM 


tuM) 16-meg iam.60nB 


$40 


310«8-6172 


AM/FM^CD4CAR 


Blaupunkt naw In box 


IBB 
hVA 


310-47M130 


ARIZONA VS. UCLA 


student i>MI1tokst 


31029»«036 


ASSM OAK DESK 


grasloondMon 


'$« 


31(^839^136 


B^ALLTIX 


cal, /una, al games 


$64- 


31(>29»«36 


BASKETBALL T1X 


retnaii liny games 


$10M 


31(>«244663 


BBALLT1X 


UCLAvsAZ' 


N/A 


310443-1907 


BMXBiKE 


tiliaidtenondt>«cl( 


$70 


31(K20B43ee 


BOX SPRING W/ 


bedframs4nMHra8s 


129 


31047M130 


COR BLANK CD'S 
DIABLO GAME 


setof15w«hc«ee 
eve(yt*igln abcK 


$30 
$25 

IK 


310«7-7979 
310-26fr8172 


ETHERNET CARD 


PC.great4donns 


310815-1583 


EXSULA/1RRADESSA 


1/2 Price 


«95 


310-394-3700 


QRAPHINQ CALC 
JORDANS 


Cask) 

size 101/2 bIckywhNB 


$50 
100 


31O20(M390 
310465-^135 


MATTRESS 


twlnnMi|ire9s 


N/A 


310-208^)861 


NEW HARD DRIVE 


qusnlum 4.30 aids new 


$22^ 


310-267-7979 


PARKING 


landWn/^ayley 


$80 


310824-3304 


PARKING SPACE 




$50 


310^000661 


PHONE 


at&t never ussd 


$20 


310-8244683 


POOL CUE 


beaulMUl custom 


$50 


310-2084389 


SATACT.GRE.ETC 


nswiftussd 


$3-10 


310477-7333 


SHARE RM IN SPG 


fern prat, acgarprk 


$337J0 


818-2105808 


SKIS AND POLES 


180 atomic lyroNa 


IBO 


310442-8685 


UCLA VAN POOL 


pasadsneUciwIs 


$aB08a 


310-7984668 



WTERBED MATT. 



waveles8,queen,likenew 



$150 



2ia«544495 



t'" 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



Check Amos for Sale 14900! tor the car yniive heen lookinn for 



Displa" 
206-3060 



Daily Bruin Oa^iilM 



Wf<ln«day,W)ruary18,1998 27 




BRENTWOOD- U1 North ol Sunset. 1 mfle 
from UCLA. Fireplace, pool, gated parking, 
and laundry in quiet and private security 
buitoing. $1195/n<o. 8310-476-5806. 

MAR VISTA $1,795. 4-bdnn/4-bath. 3-ievel 
lovimhouse. Fireplace, gated garage, unit 
alarm, sundeck. Open Mon-Sat, 3954 
Beethoven st. 310-391-1076. 

MAR VISTA. $925 2^)dnn/2-ba 2-8(ory cus- 
tom lownhonws. Fireplace, gated garage, 
unit alarm. Open Monday-Saturday 10-5 
11748 Courtleigh Or. 310-391-1076. 

OVERLAND NATIONAL. Cozy. 2bdrm/1ba 
apartment. Quiet buikling. hardwood floors, 
refrigerator and stove. $750/mo $700 secur- 
ity deposit 310-458-7726 



CasaBlanca West 

Large Furnished 
& Unfurnished 

1 Bedroom S895 - $945 






H '3ti^ - y»* a-fr'nft-r /^^^ 



530 Veteran 
208-4394 



PALMS. $1045. 2-bed-2-bath. 2-8lory town- 
homes Fireplace, gated garage, unit alann, 
open7day8 3614 Farle Drive. 310-391-1076 
or 310-837-0906 Manager. 

PALMS. $1150. Large l-bdmn, 1 5-beth. Loft, 
fireplace, balcony, private sundeck, A^C, new 
carpel/Vyl-Near shops/fwy 310-836-6007 

PA^MS. $1795. 4-t)d4^lo(t, 3-ba 3-level town- 
fiouse Fireplace, gated garage, unit alarm, 
sundeck Open Mon-Sal, 10-5. 3640 
Westwood Blvd 310-391-1076. 

PALMS $595, 1 -bedroom, entry system, 
very quiet, all appNanoes. Convenient to 
campus Security deposit $100. A/C, laundry. 
310-837-7061. 

PALMS. Ibdmn/lba. Carpet, newly painted. 
Utilities included. Icar parking Center court- 
yard $575 310-558-1782 or 310-839-8105. 

PALMS Single apt from $465-$495. 1-bdmi, 
$595 Stove, refrigerator and 1-montti free 
w/year lease $300deposit 310-837-1502 
leave message. 

SANTA MONICA, BRENTWOOD, WEST- 
WOOD and Itw WESTSIDE. Over 1.000 
properties each week. LOW FEE. Westside 
Rental Connection. 310-395-RENT. 
www. westaidaienials.com 

WALK TO UCLA 

Weetwood. 2bdrm with view. washerAlryer 
In unM. 2A>th. Microwave oven, retiigerator, 
fireplace, very bright. 21-8q.loot jecuzzi 
31(M7§-0807. 

WESTWOOD ADJACENT $1300 Condo 2- 
bdrm/2-bath. Bateorty, appliances, pod. 
quiet kicked buHding/garage 310-553-6662. 

WESTWOOD LARGE studio apaiHeenl with 
balcony AN appliances Secured parking. 
Walk to UCLA. MOOi 310-208-4834. 



PALMS SINGLE. Pleasant, quiet buiMing. 
pool. frig, stove $525. 310-836-1424. 

WESTWOOD, 1440 Veteran. Studio w/full 
kitchen, bed, desk Secured building&park- 
ing. Utilities paid. Pool, spa, laundry, 
rec.room. $795/mo. 818-222-1909 or 310- 
478-7570. 

WESTWOOD- WALK TO UCLA- Small 
bachetor, utilities paid plus bathroom, hot- 
piate-f small fridge. $400. WLA Large singles 
pari(ing, $550,310-476-8090. 

WESTWOOD. 1 MIN from UCLA. Single 
$750 Gated complex Pool Laundry. All util- 
ities pakl. 1 yr lease. 310-824-1830. 

WESTWOOD 2bdrm/1bth w/oven 
range&dishwasher Gated buikjing, 2-car 
tandem pariung. Available now. 1675 Man- 
ning $1000/mo. 310-476-6763. 

WESTWOOD. CATHEDRAL CEILINGS, fire- 
place, 2-bdrm/2-bath, 2nd story, balcony, 
new frklge. stove. &dishwasher Newly paint- 
ed Walk lo UCLA. $1,300 310-824-0523. 

WESTWOOD. Channing, elegant, quiet 2- 
bdrm, 1.5-b^th Dining room, hardwood 
floors, waanerAlryer. stove/trig, remote ga- 
rage. Gardener. Like homel $1400. 310-440- 
2050. 

WESTWOOD Extra large 1-bdnn apart- 
ment. Upper-unit, quiet buikling, hanjwood 
floors. New appliances. parking, 
washer/dryer. Walking distance to UCLA. 
$1,10(Vtno. 310-206-2806 



WLA-$590/mo Ask about free rent Attrac- 
tive furnished-singles. Near UCLAA/A Ideal 
for students Suitable for two Definite must 
see! 1525 Sawtelle Bl. 310-477-4832 




t -ated 

parking, a/c, washer/dryer, refngerator, 
stove, mcrowave, walk-in ctoset, fireplace. 
$1495. 310-446-1347. 

WLA. $950. TOWNHSE/APT 2bdrm/1 5ba 
2 partdngs. AC. dishwasher, fireplace, stove, 
fridge. 1826 Bundy Dr 310-450-8414. 



WLA. 2-bdrm/2-bath. Huge living 
room+window view AC. security building, 
washer/dryer. Inside parking Robinson/Pco. 
15min driving. Buses. $925/mo 310-825- 
9625. Hm 310-289-8281 



Room for jtolp 
FREE RM&BOARD 

(OWN BA/PHONE) in exchange for 20hrs wk 
in beautiful WLA hm. Duties include hse 
cleaning, laundry&babysitting 310-837- 
8807 

ROOM/BOARD&SMALL 
SALARY 

Busy executive in Glendale needs help 
w/household duties, lite cooking, cleaning, 
shopping Occasional help w/2 young child- 
ren. Quality individuals ONLY Good driving 
record&references a musti 618-249-6105 or 
818-241-7383 ask tor Peter Blacksberg 



■U0 - 

^^m.^ , M — 

■pORI lOr 



Il6llt 




Sato 



WEST DALE Near schools, shopping, 1844 
square feet 3-bdrm/2-bath. den, new car- 
pet/tiardwood ftoors 2-fireplaces. By owner. 
$360,000. 310-206-6028/473-8191. 





MAR VISTA, $62S/monlh. Ask about tree 
rent. Attrective, fumialiad 1-Mrm. Large, 
pool, pate, barbecue area. Quiet-tMjMding. 
3748 InglBwood Blvd. 310-386-8579. 



FORMER UCLA TENNIS PLAYER seeks 
gueattwuaa «M) court. WiN pay rent and or 
exchange lasaona. Have relerences. 310- 
585-6073 

GRAD STUDENT WHO COMMUTES from 
Bay Area seeks quiet room M-W evenings 
only Contact Robert at rdeesOucIa edu or 
860613-0507. , . 



BEL AIR. 7-min from UCl^ Pnv entrance, 
room, bath, kitchen/laundry priveleges. utili- 
ties included. Parking. Grad-student pre- 
ferred $600/mo. 310-476-4901. 

BEVERLY HILLS, furnished private rooms in 
large house w/grad students, kitchen privi- 
leges, pool, washer/dryer, utilities/irKluded. 
Need car, $475/$575 (huge separate rear 
room). Leave message Atjbey 310-275- 
3831or 818-783-5151. 

BEVERLYWOOD. Rmmate wanted, fem. 
pref. 15min from scfiool. Own rm/ba. 
$52S/mo-fShared utilties. Very quiet. 310- 
559-1935. 

BRENTWOOD. Move-in ASAP. Share 3- 
bdrm apartment tiN April 3/possiblitfy for 
ior>ger. Master bedroom/own bathroom, 
partcing, no-deposit. S675 obo. CalL 3^1 
820-0424. 

BRENTWOOD. Share 2-bdmi/2-bath. Pri- 
vate room and bath. Near slK)ps. Fireplace, 
pato. Ctiarming. Female N/S, No pet. 
$500/mo 310-478-2105 



BRUN 




WEDNESDAY EVENING 



BROADCAST STATIONS 



A - Century Cable B = Channel Name 



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Law « Order "Causa ILaw ft Or4r McCoy' 



rreen 
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EafflaraMa 



Fool Soldier "The 

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Gre9(R)X 



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pushes the limits ol powrer 



Wayone 
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Law 4 Order Temtnar 
(R) (in Sliweo) X 
(In Stereo) X 



Aawrl ca n EspsHewce 1BJ" "Beautiful Texas/My 
Felow Americans" (R) (In Stereo) (Pan 1 of 2) X 



Drew Carey 

"BatmotMle' 



X 



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trartifeims a mik^ueloast »)to a mighty rrwn. X 
Star Irak: " ^ 



Voyaoer 
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Marto Isabel 



Law r40reaf 

TMushfooms 



SanMnel Tinkeknan's 
Fdy- (in Stereo) X 



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♦*v, "Sasfca«cyNnMn'(1d54. Western) 
Alan Ladd.Shaley Winters 



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Sports 
tooTts(R) iNews 
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Center. (Live 



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5wwier«"(Part1ol2) 






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DukealClemson (Uve) 

iSi>s The Senriar 



MTV Uve (In Slereo) 



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Adventures 



WSd~lS5n5SS 
(R) iNsers 
sports iMielralsd 
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kavMlcit^ALMeMiir 

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BabylenS-Learf;^ 
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(in St ereo) X 

IBiJJ»nfLi TttaffflM 

raonNmoer. ine aeriOT 
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TUT 

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News X 



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LanteLoco 



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X 



Stereo) X OtyMOie Winter Gaaws 

From Nagano, Japan X 



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X 



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Past 



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KaeiNn Ivory Wayarw 

Hostt d Tovetne " 



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FEB. 18, 1998 



HMMlWild 
Web 



Late MgM (In Stereo) K 



(R) (In Slereo) X 



Life and 



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(In 

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1991)Bnjce" 



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Star Trek "ThT 
Changeing" 



Cops (In 
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Row Women" (R) 



"DeaOt 



*•• THX-r»3r(1971. Science 
Fiction) Robert Ouval. 'GP' 



T7w(3iwirBehsm«i'(t950) London is 
invaded by a ra>ioactive SM monster^ 

I Expose The Dancing 
Game"(R) 



vHlnte TNae Jusaoe (n) 



rweMgalnajM 
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PriiM Time PuMfe AlWrs W 



Fool Soldter "The 
Napdeoriic Sddier' (R) 



*♦ Vomt AfgvUm Wty' (iwa 
Musical) Betty Grable, Don Amecho 



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CWNIS^wrts 
idteUs 



Justice FSssTsSiidr 

Memones" 



mussaapsitair 






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SportsoenterB 



ReecueSII (In Stereo) X 



Unsolved Hyateftee (In 
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WWN 



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{IM World 

(In Stereo) 



[ en the Great Barrier 






Diagnosis Maiiar 0" 

9(emo)[B 



Dis c over 

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**V, "A Dnm IsiWish Your H»ait KUaa: fhr~ 
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Classitieds 
825 2221 



Let over 56.000 readers know it s your triend s birttiday. 



Displa' 
206-301 



28 Wednesday, Feimiary 18, 1998 



DaHy Bnmi Sports 



VOLLEYBALL 

From page 32 

mance since Scales expects Nacve 
to take some time to Hnd his rhythm 
again. 

Naeve isn't the only question 
mark for UCLA. Opposite Evan 
Thatcher experienced back spasms 
on Monday and was unable to prac- 
tice. Outside hitter Ben Moselle has 
been practicing at the opposite 
^4>osition and could start the match. 
With Moselle at opposite, junior 
Fred Robins will likely step into the 
starting lineup alongside freshman 
Mark Williams. 

"We're a very flexible team * 
Scates said. "In fact, the last time 
we played against Santa Barbara 
we used three different lineups, so it 
just depends on who's playing 
well." 

While the Bruins will be busy 
making their own lineup adjust- 
ments, they will also need to focus 
on containing UCSB's top hitters. 

Outside hitter Kevin Collins cur- 
rently leads the Gauchos in kills 
with 122, while averaging 5.3 kills a 
game. Middle blocker Jeremy 
Darner is a player that Scates likens 
to UCLA's Naeve. 



Although Darner is a quick hit- 
ter, he is on the receiving end of a 
majority of the sets. Like Naeve, 
the Gauchos will not hesitate to set 
him out of the back row. Darner 
averages 4.87 kills a game along 
with a .435 hitting clip. 



UCLA ... has swept 

eight of its ten 

oppoilents.The ~ 

Bruins have only lost 

three games this 

year. 



TRACK 



"He hurt us a lot last time we 
played them up there," Scates said. 
"We have to slow him down. 

"You don't have to stop both of 
those guys, but if we take one of 
them out then you're in good shape 
because they don't go to the other 
players very much. If we can key on 
those two guys and effectively slow 
one of them, then we should be in 
good shape." 



From page 32 

place. Mel Moultry fmished third in 
the triple jump with a mark of 50-5 
1/2. 

Four members of the men's team 
went to Indianapolis, Ind., to race in 
the highly competitive Cannon IV 
Classic put on by Butler University 

Distance runner Mark Hauser 
made the most out of the trip to 
Indiana as he earned a personal 
record and an NCAA provisional 
qualifying mark in the 3,000. 
Hauser's time of 8:02.09 bettered his 
previous indoor best of 8:16.01, which 
he set last week at the Los Angeles 
Indoor Invitational. 

Hauser fmished ninth overall and 
was the sixth collegiate runner to 
cross the line. Coach Bob Larsen feels 
that Hauser will qualify for nationals 
since he is only one second away from 
the automatic qualifying time. 

"It was a great race for (Hauser)," 
Larsen said. "It's a huge improve- 
ment for him. People run fast here 
every year." 

Mebrahtom Keflezighi automati- 
cally qualified for nationals in the 
5,000 after his performance on 
Saturday. Keflezighi fmished fifth 



with a time of 13:59.17. 

"The main goal was to qualify for 
nationals," Larsen said of Keflezighi's 
performance. "He's real strohg but 
not real fast yet. The pace picked up 
and he couldn't go with the leaders." 

Michael Granville and Jess 
Strutzel competed in the 800 on the 
short, 200-mcter track. Granville fin- 
ished third in 1:51.01 while Strutzel 
placed sixth in 1:52.64. The runners 



(Deana) Simmons will 

be the person to beat 

in the triple jump at 

the 1998 Pac-10 

Championships. 



kept the pace modest throughout 
much of the race, after Granville, 
Strutzel and Larsen anticipated a fast 
race. 

"Granville was too cautious and 
(Strutzel) should've caught up to 
(Granville) after he realized the pace 
was modest." 

Meanwhile, the UCLA women's 
track and field team also n^ade its 



mark at the Air Force Indoor 
Invitational. 

Sophomore Deana Simmoqiptook 
first in the women's triple jump event 
with a mark of 43-5. After an impres- 
sive showing in the long jump last 
weekend at the Los Angeles Indoor 
Invitational, Simmons competed in 
her primary event on Saturday and 
earned an automatic berth in the 
NCAA Indoor Track and Field 
Championships. Simmons will be the 
person to beat in the triple jump at the 
1998 Pac-10 Championships. 

In the women's pole vault, Erica 
Hoeming took second place with a 
mark of 1 1-5 3/4. This was Hoeming's 
first competition this season. She per- 
formed well against the rest of the 
field. She was iied for first place after 
her final vault, but received second on 
the tiebreaker. 

In the women's long jump, Kelly 
O'Connor jumiM a seasonal best 18- 
8 to take 1 Ith place. Right behind her 
was fellow Bruin Keisha Porter, who 
jumped 18-3 to take 14th place. Both 
women added another foot on their 
jumps from last weekend's marks at 
the Los Angeles Indoor Invitational. 

The women's shot put event was 
swept by UCLA for the second week- 
Sec IMCX, page 29 



War of Independence 



On May 14th 1948, the State of Israel was proclaimed according to the UN partition plan (1947). 
Over the radio David Ben-Gurion (who would be Israel's first Prime Minister) proclaimed the 
independence of the "Jewish Sute." The proclamation stated that the Sute of Israel "would be open to the 
immigration of Jews from all the countries of their dispersion." Non-Jewish citizens were promised 
freedom of religion and guaranteed that the sanctity of their religion and holy sites would be maintained. 

Less than 24 hours later, the regular armies of Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and Iraq invaded the 
country, forcing Israel to defend the soveretgittyjt had regained in irs ancestral homeland. This began what 



is known as Israel'.s War of 
cease-fire was declared in 
conducted under UN 
refused to negotiate 
the end of the fightii 
sovereignty, Judea 
Egyptian adminisi 
including the Old Ci 
holiest site) came u 
to the Western Wall 




1949). The 
ng the first, 
txtween Israel and each 
Israel to date), resulting in 
ingly, the coastal plain. 
Bank) came 
1cm wa: 
Israel, the weslPHtoctor. 
brdanian nil'- AccordtAto 
However, this was not 



captured the Old City, were Jews fully allc 



On the daj 
adopted. The poer 



Israel was decU 



k-^ .^- I. 



WIS 



So long as still within tiorkma^'i 
The Jewish heart beats true. 
So long as still toward the East 
To Zion looks the Jew. 




te the Kltional Ajihem. call 
I's desire to netum to ' ' "^ 



stages and the final 

negotiations were 

pt Iraq Which has 

the situation at 

within Israel's 

Itrip came under 

the eastern part. 

Wall (Judaism's 

low Jews access 

n, when Israel 



a (The Hope) was 



So long as our hopes are not yet lost. 
Two thousand years we cherished them. 
To live as a free people in our land. 
Land of Zion and Jerusalem. 



Information Compiled By: Rachel Mctson and Daniel Inlcnder 

•This is tlic fifth in a series of twelve short essays lo be pnnted in honor of the SOlh Aaniversary of the Stale of Israel 

(1 948- 1 998).* 



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Display 
206-3UbO 



Daily Bruin Sports 



Wednesday, February 18, 1998 29 



TRACK 



From page 28 

end in a row. Senior Nada Kawar, 
who has already qualified for the 
1998 NCAA Indoor 

Championships, took second with 
a throw of 57-3/4 behind former 
Bruin Valeyta Althouse, who won 
with a throw of 61-8 3/4 while 
competing for Reebok. Kawar's 
top throw this weekend was a life- 
time indoor best and the second- 
best throw in the nation for 1998. 
Seilala Sua took third place in 
both the women's shot put, wkh a 
throw of 55-5, and the weight 
throw, with a mark of 58-1 1/4. 
Meanwhile, Rachelle Noble com- 
pleted the women's sweep in the 
shot put with a fourth place throw 
of 50-1 1 1/2, and went on to cap- 
ture the women's weight throw 
with a provisional mark of 61-9 
1/2, which should qualify her for 
the indoor championships. 



M. BASKETBALL 

From page 32 

late. 

They have lost seven of the last 
eight (the only win came in overtime 
against Pac-10 cellar-dweller 
Washington State), and have lost 



MEN'S BA 




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MATTHEW SCHMD/Daity Brum 



four in a row. 

Last week, USC was routed at 
home by California, 73-43, and 
Stanford, 83-59, by a combined 54 



points - the Trojans' largest total 
margin of defeat for consecutive 
home games in school history. 

"It's been a disappointing year 
knowing that we are losing games,'' 
USC head coach Henry Bibby said. 
"We're just a little young - a little 
youthful - and we just don't know 
how to play at this level yet." 

The top four players from last 
year's NCAA tournament squad all 
graduated - taking 60 percent of the 
team's points and almost all of its 
experience with them. 

Like the Bruins, USC's roster has 
changed more often than Dennis 
Rodman's hair style. 

Last week, guard Ken Sims was 
kicked off the team, while Bibby-fius- 
pended point guard Gary Johnson 
(curfew violation) and shooting 
guard Elias Ayuso (poor academic 
performance). 

Both Johnson and Ayuso will 
return for tonight's contest. 

All told, USC has started 16 dif- 
ferent lineups this year. 



WATER POLO 

From page 30 

her four attempts." 

The depth of this team was 
demonstrated as even the benchers 
participated and expertly held off 
the Rainbows at the end of the 
game. 

"We emptied the bench with 
about four minutes into the game, 
and I was really happy with that 
group," Baker said. "They did a 
good job. They made some good 
progress and played with some con- 
fidence." 

Everyone agrees with the 
respectable performances by the 
defense and non-starters. But assis- 
tant coach Adam Krikorian admits 
he didn't know what to expect 
before the game. 

"I was a little worried at first 
because it was our first home game, 
we never played this team and 
we've had some slow starts before," 



Krikorian said. "But the girls came 
out strong and even the j>eople off 
the bench came in and hung in 
there to score a point or two against 
Hawaii. 

"We'll take what we learned 
from this week, and that will help 
when we play them again in three 
weeks. We're still looking to 
improve. We're never ultimately 
satisfied." 

The Bruins have the next weckr 
end off from competition. The next 
two weeks is where they fine-tune 
their skills and strategies in prepa- 
ration for a very busy midseason. 

Baker hopes to take the momen- 
tum of the early season's success 
and improve during this period of 
two weeks. 

"It was the nice way to finish the 
first part of the season," Baker said. 
"The next two weeks is very critical 
for the team. We've got to get a lot 
of work done and improve before 
we get busy with the upcoming 
games." 



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10:20 am^Eartk's Ice Age., Ckaos Tkeoty and Wkat Tkey Tell Us Akout 
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1 1:00 am: Can ^ ftedict Eartkquakes? Leon Knopoff, UCLA. 

1 :30 pm: Tke Origin of Eartk and Planets. George Wetkerill, Carnegie 
Institute. 

2:10 pm: Tke Core Dynamics of Plantary Magnetic Field. Gary Glaizmaier, 
Los Alamos National Lab. 

2:50 pnt: Meteor Impacts and tkeir Role in Skaping Planetary Evolution. 
Tkomas J. Akrens, CalTeck. 

3:30 pm: Tke Mars P*tkfinder: Last of tke Cowboys. Antkony j . Spear 

Jet FVopulsion Labs. V onr-day 

4:10 pm: Panel Discussion witk Audience Questi 




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30 Wednnday, February 18, 1996 



Daly Bruin Sports 



^•<' 




Bruins shatter Rainbows 
witti ttiundering 1 4 goals 



Dr. Yitzchok Block, Ph.D. 

)m in Nashville, Tennessee, Yitzchok 

Block holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from 

■ Harvard Uijiversity. He is a professor of 

philosophy at the university of Western 

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professional areas of interest are 

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Perspectives on the Philosophy of 

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\ls belief in G-d solely a matter of 
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Sponscned by Chabad House at U.C.L.A. 



W.WATERPOLJO: Novice 
Hawaii team squashed by 
more experienced UCLA 



By Steve Kkn 

Daily Bmin Contributor 

The University of Hawaii water 
polo team's trans-Pacific visit to 
California was no trip to paradise, as 
it was greeted by its Bruin hosts with 
a shower of yellow balls. Fourteerr 
yellow balls, to be precise. 

Coming into the game, the Bruins 
did not know what to expect from 
this new team. On one hand, the 
Rainbows are inexperienced, playing 
together in their first varsity season. 
On the other hand, they came to the 
match with a 2-0 record and a hand- 
ful of noteworthy foreign recruits. 

But after the first quarter, there 
was no question as to who dominate 
ed. 

The Bruins started explosively 
with fast offense, including three 
scores by junior Coralie Simmons 
and two scores by junior Catherine 
von Schwarz. Sophomore Erin 
Golaboski lied Simmons for most 
points scored with three, while 
sophomore Serela Mansur and fresh- 
man Kristin Guerin contributed two 
points each. 

UCLA head coach Guy Baker was 
pleased with the team's first home 
game performance and looks for- 
ward tq continued success. 

"I liked the way we played in the 
first quarter," Baker said. >"I was 
happy we got off to a good start and 
set the tone for the whole game. We 



talked about coming out and playing 
good defense and (getting) going on 
the fast break. And we did that." 

Besides scoring 14 points agtihlT 
Hawaii, the Bruins' forte was in their 
superior defense. As good as senior 
goalie and team captain Nicolle 
Payne is, she didn't have much 
chance to block, thanks to her defen- 
sive teammates. The Rainbows could 
only score two points. 

"We played really consistently and 
our defense was good," said Payne. 
"Everyone got to play and we had a 
lot of fun." 



^i^ 



"One of (Hawaii's) great 

players ended up 

scoring only one goal 

but of her four 

attempts." 

MandyMcAloon 

UCLA junior defender 



Just about everyone raved abbut 
the defense, and one of the best 
defenders of the game was junior 
Mandy McAloon. 

"We have a very strong defensive 
team as a whole - definitely not just 
one player," McAloon said. "To me, 
the defense wins the game and that's 
shown in our last tournament and 
this game. One of their great playen 
ended up scoring only one goal out of 

Sec WIIEI HWlit |M9C 29 



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Mow The Top 25 tAtfH 



I. North Carolina (26-1) (M not pi^. 
Next n. North Carolina State, Satunlay. 

I Dulie (23 2) did not play. Not: at 
Oenuon, Wednesday. 

3. Arinna (22-3) did not play. Next at 
Orefon State, Thursday. 

4. Kamas (2S-3) did not play. Next: n. 
Iowa State, Saturday. 

S.funkie (22-4) did not play. Next at 
Iowa, Wednesday. 

6. Utah (21 -2) did not play. Next: vs. Air 
Force, Satunlay. 

7. Connecticut (23-4) beat Notre Dame 
88-79. Next at VManova, Satunlay. 

8. Kentucky (22-4) did not play. Next: at 
Florida, Wednesday 

9. Princeton (211 ) beat Pennsyh«nia 71 
S2. Next: vs. Harvard, Fnday 

10. Sunford (21-3) did not play. Next: vs. 
Washington, Thursday. 

I I . New Mexico (20-3) did not play. Next 
vs. Texas-El Paso, Thursday. 

12. UCtA (19-S) did not p<ay.Next:al 
Southern California, Wednesday. 

1 3. South Carolina (19-4) did not pUy. 
Next: at No. 16 Arkansas, Wednesday. 

14.Michi9an Sute (19-5) beat No. 22 
MidHgan 80-7S. Next at Wisconsin, 
Saturday. 

1S.Mississippi(17-S) did not play. Next: at 
ISU.Wednesday. 

16. Arkansas (20 S) did not play. Next: vs. 
No. 1 3 South Carolina, Wednesday. 

17. Cindnnali (19-S) did not play. Next: at 



Alabama-Bimiingham, Thursday. 

18. Massachusetts (19-6) did not play. 
Next: vs. Rhode Island. Wednesday. 

19. feus Christian (23-4) did not play. 
Next: vs. Na 1 1 New Mexkoi Saturday. 

20.WestVir9ima (21-5) did not play.Next: 
vs. Seion Hal, Sunday. ^ 

21 . Syracuse (20-5) did not play. Next at 
Rutgers, Satunlay. 

22.MicMgan(18-8)losttoNa14 
MidiifM Sute 80-75. Next vs. Indiana, 
Sunday. 

23. NKnois (18-8) did not play. Next: w 
Northwestern, Wednesday. 

24. George Washington (20-6) did not 
play. Next: vs. Temple, Sunday. 

25. Maryland (15-8) did not play. Next: VI 
Wake Forest, Thursday. 



OlynipK Medal-, 
At A Otancc 



Mens Colleqi' Bisk, tb.ill 
M.ijor Sior I" 



EAST 

B«dgnU.83,Nonheast(m79 
Fairield92,Siena84 
Pittsburgh 80,Geot9etown 79 
Princeton 71, taw 52 
feinplcS0,StJoieptfs42 

sovm 

LfemesseeSt81,W.Carelina69 
Georgia St 73, Mercer 57 
Tennessee 87, Mississippi St 61 
UNC-Greemfaon58,FunnanS6 



Atlantic Division 

W L 

Miami 34 1» 

NewJersey 31 21 

NewYM 29 21 

Washington 27 26 

Orlando 2S 27 

Boston 23 29 

Philadelphia 16 33 



Pa 
.654 
i96 

5m 



G8 

3 
4 



Portland lOl.GoMen Sute 83 
Sacramento 102, Boston 99 



G Brian Shaw. 



Sn 71/2 



.481 
.442 



9 
11 



^ffliall 
"wago 

Oiaitoae 

Atlanu 
Cleveland 



OMflon 

39 15 

36 15 

30 21 

30 23 

28 24 

25 26 



G 

Germany 7 

Norway 7 

Russia 8 

Canada 4 

Austria 2 

United States 5 

Netherlands 4 

Finland 2 

lapan 4 

luly 1 

France 2 

Switzerland 2 

China 

South Korea 2 
C»ch RepuUicO 



Sweden 

Belarus 

Bulgaria 

Denmark 

Ukraine 

Belgium 

Kazakstan 



Tot 
22 
19 
13 
12 
12 
10 
10 
10 

8 

7 
-4- 

S 

3 

2 



Connecticut 88, Notre Dame 79 
Michigan St 80, Midiigan 75 

FMIIRSr 

Boise St 77, Nevada 67 



Wonn-ti ■, Coll>'9<' B.i'.krth.ill 
Md|Ot Scores 



EAST 

Fairfield 77, lona 58 
Holy Cross 96, BuckneN 55 
Morgan St. 59, Delaware 55 
Siena88,Marist60 
St Peter's 55, Manhattan 47 



23 
11 



2t 

40 



J27 161/2 



.722 — 

.706 - 1 1/2 

i88 71/2 

i66 81/2 

i38 10 

.490 121/2 

.451 14 1/2 

.216 261/2 



Milwaukee at WasMngton, 7 pjn. 
Minnesou at Otlandoi 7 JO pan. 
New Jersey at AHano, 7:30 p.m. 
NewVMkatUUh,8pim. 
LA Lakers at Phoenix, 9 pjn. 
Psnbnd a* Seattle; 10 pim. 
Boston at Vancouver, 10 pjn. 
Charlotte at GoMen State, 10:30 p.m. 



NESTEmOMFBENa 

Midwest Onnion 

W I 
UUh 35 IS 

San Antonio 35 16 



G6 



MinnesoU 28 22 



Vancouver 

Dallas 

OcHvcr 



Pet 

700 — 

686 1/2 

560 7 

26 25 .510 91/2 

14 37 .275 211/2 

10 42 .192 26 

5 46 .091 301/2 



Chicago at ImMi^ 7 pjn. 

PNMi^aliMhna.7pLm. 

San Amnio at 0ito,8:30 p.m. 

Detroit «tloiHton,8JO pjn. 

Miami vs. LA. Clippers at Aiuiteim, CaMf., 

10:30 p.m. 

Denver at LA likca lUt FkM. 

Al ttMf M tM ipifis MR Ms CDT. 



BALTIMORE RAVENS— Acquired R8 Errict 
Rhett ham the lampa Bay Buccaneers for 
a 1999 thinl-round draft pid. Re-signed 
TE Eric Green to a two-year contraa 
MOIANAPOIIS COLTS— Named Ion Tonne 
comMoning coach. 
JAOOONVIUi JAGUARS— Released S 
Dana Hal. 

MMM OOIPNMS— Signed 6 Kevin 
HMNOlqf M a fM-year (Minct 
mUSOaWMC HmgnedPt 
Jain Rindfe to a i*e-year cantiaa 
NEW VOW GIANTS— Signed 08 Kent 
Goham to a three-year contract. 
NCWVOK JETS— Signed WR Bemam 



ST. UXIB RAMS— Named Ed White offen- 
sive line coadL 




somi 

Auburn 83, South Alabama 46 

Georgia 79, Florida 62 

GNfgiaSt62.AiabamaSt.58 

Ken(iKky76,LK(ntiKky60 

CM Dominion 92, N.C Wilminglon 51 

South Carolna 78, N.C. Charlotte 71 

MOWEST 

Caniinal Stritch 70, Robert Morris 51 
Nebraslia 96, Missouri 91 
Northwestern 75, N. Illinois 60 
W. Mnois 79, Ind-Pur-lndpls. 69, OT 



N.iiioii.il H.isKftb.iM fl^^ 



PacKk Division 

ScMlle 39 12 .765 

LAlakm 35 14 .714 



3 



Phoenix 34 16 .680 41/2 



Portlan4 31 20 

Sacnwam 24 29 

lAOIppers 11 41 

GoWenSute 9 41 



.608 
.453 



8 

16 



.212 2tl/2 
.180 291/2 



New lersey 103, Milwaukee 92 
Orlando 85, Atlama 81 
Houston 121, LA Clippers 99 
UUh 96, Charlotte 90 



EASTEMCONfERENa 



PhiUdelpMa 98, Cleveland 97 
Miami 110, Minnesota 84 
San Antonio 95, Detroit 94 
Chicago 105, Iflduna 97 
Phoenix 95, Dalas 77 
Newtl0ffc91,0tmer77 



BALTIMORE OWHES-W^reed to terms 
with Of Jeffrey Hammonds on a three- 
year contract. 

ARIZONA DIAMONOBACKS—Purdiased 
the cMitract of RHf Ken Rabinson from 
the fennto Blue Jays. Designated LHP Kirt 
Ojala (or assignment 
FLOMM MAHUNS— Signed RHP Manuel 
Barrios, RHP Oscar Henriquez, RHP Andy 
LaiUn, LHP Felix Heredia, RHP Mike 
Viano; 31 Josh lootyi INF Amaury Garcia, 
IB Derrek Lee, Of Fletcher Bates, OF Todd 
Ounwoody and OF Julio Ramirez to one 
year contracts 

lOS ANGaES DOOGERS-Signed RHP 
Chan Ho Park to a two-year contract. 
NEW YORK METS— Named Tim FoH man- 
ager of Kingsport of the Appalachian 
League. 

GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS— Terminated 
the contract of F Dickey Simpkins. 
PNtUDELPHIA 76ERS— Traded F CUrence 
Weathenpoon and G Jim lackson to IM 
Golden SUte Wamors for F Joe SmitllMl 



CAROLINA HURRICANES— Reassigned G 
Tripp Tracy fta« RktNMnd of die ECHl to 

MONTREAL CANAOKNS— Assigned D 
Brett Clark to ffMcrkton o( the AHL 
Recalled D Brad tr wwiJ r owFredericien. 
NEWrOM ISUNOaiS— Nccalcd Jason 
Stnidwidt and D iason Holland from 
Kentucky of the AHL. 

0X1161 

HUNTINGDON COUEGE— Named Lisa 
Donaldson women's basketball coach 



1. When was the first time the Soviet 
Union participated in the Winter 
Olympics? 

2. Including George Hackl, how many 
Winter Olympians have won the same 
evem three times? 

3. Coming into the 1998 Winter Olympics, 
which nation had won the most medals? 



i(MU0N( 

9S«l'l 



Daily Bruin Sports 



Ups and downs leave 
UCLA on high ground 



BASEBALL Bruins finally 
defeat Cal, prepare for 
Stanford after shaky start 



ByVytosMazcifca 

Daily Bnjin Staff . 

After Jelani-gate, the Harrick 
fiasco and the women's softball pro- 
bation, UCLA has taught everyone 
to expect the unexpected. 

The UCLA baseball team likes 

the "unexpected" philosophy so 

much that they have decided to 

iiadopt it as well. 



This past weekend at Berkeley, 
the No. 16 Bruins (6-4 overall. 2-0 in 
Six-Pac) were supposed to play three 
games against Cal (2-5-1, 0-2). But 
rain and darkness prevented UCLA 
from completing the series, and only 
two games were played. 

On Friday, the first game of the 
series was suspended due to dark- 
ness in the seventh inning, with the 
Bruins up 11-8. Then on Saturday 
the game could not be finished due 
to rain. Finally on Sunday, the first 
game was completed with the Bruins 
coming out on top 13-8. 

The same day, UCLA and Cal 
played the second game of the 
series. In arguably the most exciting 
game of the year so far, UCLA won 
11-10 in 10 innings. 

The final game of the series was to 
be played on Monday, but because 
of rain it was cancelled and resched- 
uled for March 31 - the day after 
UCLA visits Stanford. 

To further support the "unexpect- 
ed" theme, the Bruins won the sec- 
ond game against Cal thanks to a 
pinch-hitter. 

Freshman outfielder Nick Lyon 
stepped up to the plate for only the 
second time this season and ham- 
mered a ball over the wall to provide 



UCLA with a 11-9 lead. 

The Bruins' yo-yo season seemed 
doomed after a 1-4 start. But a cur- 
rent five-game winning streak and a 
2-0 start in league play has the 
Bruins riding high. 

The fact that UCLA came home 
for two weeks was not enough to 
drive the "unexpected" away. 

With a game scheduled for 
Tuesday against Loyola 

Marymount, the Bruins returned to 
find that the baseball field af Jackie 
Robinson Stadium needed rnainte- 
nance. The game is now scheduled 
to be played today at 3 p.m. « 

Sophomore pitcher Ryan 
Reightley, after missing his sched- 
uled start against Cal, will start 
today for the Bruins and pitch only a 
few innings. 

UCLA head coach Gary Adams 
wants his starters in top form when 
top-ranked Stanford plays three 
games at UCLA this weekend. 




AARON TOUr/Ojity Biuin 

Freshman Ryan Carter pitches 
during the game against 
University San Diego. 



:x 



Wednesday, February 18, 1998 31 






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}2 Wednesday, February 18, 1998 



Daily Biuin Sports 



A 



SPORTS 



Bruins to face USC without IVIcCoy 



M. BASKETBALL With shuflled 
lineup, team hastens to toughen 
defense as Duke game nears 



By Brent Boyd 

Daily Bruin Staff 



They've done it before, and now they'll have 
to do it again. 

The Bruins will enter their second stint 
tonight without Jelani McCoy and his 6-foot-IO- 
inch frame standing in the middle of the key. 

In its first game since the resignation of 
McCoy. UCLA (19-5, 9-4 Pac-IO) will take on 
USC at the Sports Arena in a game that will 
undoubtedly be used as a measuring stick for 
how well the Bruins will perform without their 
star center. 

It will be the only tune-up for the McCoy-less 
Bruins before Sunday's showdown at secondr 
ranked Duke. And with only three weeks to pre- 
pare for the NCAA tournament, the game takes 
on added significance. 

"Obviously this is a big week," head coach 
Steve Lavin said. "We've got to find a way to 
improve, and we only have three weeks to do it. 
We need to play better defense, collectively." 

McCoy aJso missed the first nine games of 
the season due to suspension for undisclosed 
reasons. 

In his absence, the Bruins amassed an 8-1 
record, which included their only victory over a 
ranked team this season - a 69-58 win over then- 
No. 8 New Mexico. 

Without McCoy, the Bruins will have a giant 
hole to fill. J. R. Henderson (6 feet 8 1/2 inches) 
will move over to full-time center, while fresh- 
man Travis Reed (6 feet 6 inches) figures to pick 
up more minutes at forward. 

"With (McCoy) resigning, we're obviously 
much smaller," Lavin said. "We'll have to gen- 
erate more points from the bench. Reed will 
definitely get more playing time." 

Throughout the year, Lavin has mainly used 
a six-player rotation, resulting in inexperience 
among the reserves. 

Reed, however, played well in the nine games 
before McCoy's return, averaging 5.4 points 
and 3.2 rebounds while playing about 15 min- 
utes per game. Included in that stretch was a 14- 
point, lO-rebound performance against Cal 
State Fullerton and another 14-point outing 
against New Mexico. 

Since McCoy's return, though, Reed has 
seen limited action. He has only played in nine 
of the past 15 games for a total of 63 minutes. 

"I'm going to have to be a big presence, just 
like I was before," Reed said. "Except this time, 




JUSTIN WARWN/OdJly fcutn 

Freshman forward Travis Reed dribbles the ball during a previous USC game. 



he's not coming back." 

The matchup against the Trojans (7-16. 3-10) 
couldn't have come at a better time for the 
Bruins, who have lost two of their last four 
games and barely pulled out a three-point victo- 



ry over California Saturday. 

In addition to USC's lack of a player taller 
than 6 feet 8 inches. Troy has been struggling of 

SeeM.BASKntttUpa9e29 



Undefeated UCLA looks to trample mediocre Gauchos 



III 
F 



M.VOLLEYBALL Despite 
injuries, No. 1 Bruins to 
offer little hope to UCSB 



By Grace Wen 
Daily Bruin Staff 

^ The undefeated UCLA men's vol- 
leyball team continues its stint at 
home tonight against UC Santa 
Barbara. The top-ranked Bruins will 
take on the No. 10 Gauchos in Pauley 
Pavilion at 7 p.m. 

UCLA (JO-0 overall, 8-0 
Mountain Pacific Sports Federation) 
will look to capitalize on a mediocre 
Gaucho season. UCSB will be play- 
ing its first match on the road; it 
could be a tough time for the visiting 
Gauchos. 

Although UCSB (3-4, 2-4) is com- 
ing off a win against Pacific, the 



Gauchos have not fared well thus far 
into the season. 

UCSB was swept by Stanford, UC 
Irvine and the Bruins in matches ear- 
lier this season. 

"Santa Barbara's been playing 
well, but they've been losing," UCLA 



MEN'S VOLLEY 



fonUit 



T 



UCLA 

(IM.MMPSf) 

VJ. 



PaultyPavion 



ucsi 

0-4, 2-4 MW) 



MATTHeW SCHMHVOaOy iniin 

head coach Al Scates said. "The 
coaches respect them and keep vot- 
ing them up in the top 10 even though 
they don't have a good record. 
"I think they're a play-off team. 



but they better start moving soon. I 
just don't want them to start 
(tonight)." 

UCLA, on the other hand, has 
swept eight of its 10 opponents. The 
Bruins have only lost three games this 
year. 

Returning to the lineup for the 
Bruins will be sophomore Adam 
Naeve, who hasn't played in the 
Bruins' last three matches and didn't 
practice for 10 days. 

Naeve suffered second-degree 
burns two weeks ago. He played spar- 
ingly in UCLA's win against Long 
Beach State and did not suit up for 
the matches against the San Diego 
schools. 

In the Bruins' previous meeting 
with the Gauchos. Naeve recorded a 
match-high 30 kills. It is unlikely that 
Naeve will have a repeat perfor- 



SccV0liffVMll,|M9e28 




(XRWCKKlXX) 

Junior Fred Robbins is likely to 
start against UCSB, as injuries 
force UCLA to shuffle its lineup. 



Team gets set 
to compete 
innationals 

TRACK: Weekend results 
bring hopes for strong 
Bruin p resence at NCAA s 



By Alvin Cadman and Donald 
Morrison 

Daily Bruin Contributors 

UCLA track and field assistant 
coach Art Venegas said the team 
could be on its way to putting togeth- 
er a strong showing at the NCAA 
Indoor National Championships in 
March if enough members qualify. 
After Saturday's performances at two 
different meets, Venegas feels quite 
optimistic about the team's chances 
of finishing high at the national cham- 
pionships. 

"We want to put together a good 
NCAA team," Venegas said. "If we 
can get certain people into nationals, 
then we'll have a heck of a shot." 

Two athletes that have a heck of a 
shot at qualifying for the NCAA 
indoor championships are Jim 
McElroy and Damian Allen. 
McElroy and Allen turned in stellar 
performances in the 55-meter dash at 
the Air Force Indoor Invitational in 
Colorado Springs. Colo. 

McElroy and Allen, who are used 
to running short distances as menv 
bers of the football team, each fin- 
ished in the time of 6 minutes, 17 sec- 
onds. McElroy finished third and 
Allen placed fifth in their respective 
races. Their time is one-hundredth of 
a second off the automatic qualifying 
time for the NCAA Championships. 
Venegas feels that their time, which is 
a provisional qualifying time, will be 
good enough to get them into the 
championships. 

"Tliat's an excellent indoor time," 
Venegas said. "The football players' 
are showing their expiosiveness. 
They're showing their speed and what 
kind of shape they're in early on in the 
season." 

Travis Haynes, who also competed 
at Air^ Force, automatically qualified 
for the NCAA Chantpienship* with a 
mark of 61-7 3/4 in the sliot put. 
Haynes also set an indoor lifetime 
best while finishing third. Wade Tift 
finished fourth in the same event with 
a mark of 60-1. 

Four other athletes competed at 
the Air Force meet and performed 
well. Luke Sullivan's mark of 61-1 1 in 
the weight throw was good enough to 
earn him a victory. Rich Pitchford 
captured second place in the high- 
jump with a leip of 7 I /4. Scott Stover 
vaulted 17-10 1/2 in the pole vault, 
which was good enough for second 

SceTMaiH9c28 




SPORTS 



f^-f,.:.... 



Play ball 





► I nsldo today 

Real Bruins: Life on the Java circuit 
with Kerckhoff's manager. See page 3 



Memories: Walking through dad's 
experience in Vietnam. See page 20 

Super clerks: Kevin Smith tries his 
hand at comic books. See page 24 



79th year QrculatkMt 20,000 



Thursday, February 19, 1998 



www.ddtlybruin.ucld.edu 



Nei 




• 10 



groan over porn store 



WESTWOOD: Adult-video office 
investigated; vice squad issues 
citation for lack of a permit 



ByRadMlMuAoz 

Daily Bruin Staff 

Pornography or adult entertainment? Legal 
or illegal? These are the questions surrounding 
the H6t Body International business that has 
quietly resided in Westwood for over a year. 

On Jan. 29, tipped off by homeowners 
groups complaining of a pornography video 
Here, the West Los Angeles Vice Squad investi- 
gated an office space at 10872 Weyburn Ave. 



"We went there and (the video store) was not 
what we found," said Sargent Doug Abney, 
who heads the unit that was called to the loca- 
tion. "You can't tell what type of business it is 
from the outside." 

What the officers did find inside the building 
belonging to developer Ira Smedra was two or 
three Wbrkers boxing up adult entertainment 
videos. 

When the officers saw that the business 
appeared to be only a distribution center,, they 
went ahead and "checked for all of the per- 
mits." 

Not having a business license was the only 
offense that Hot Body International was guilty 
of. It is considered a "minor ofTense." A cita- 
tion, equivalent to a traffic ticket, was written 



and the company will have to appear iq court. 

Thebusiness-hcense angle is the only thing 
that they found that they could give us grief 
over," said John Cross, the president of Hot 
Body Internation^iil. 

However, Cross knew that he wouldn't be 
renting the office on Weyburn forever. He felt 
their time might be limited because the Village 
Center Westwood project may be built on that 
same property. "We looked at it as a temporary 
warehouse space." 

But that isn't the only Westwood area loca- 
tion that Hot Body International uses for busi- 
ness space. There is also a home office on 
Levering, where Cross lives. 

S«e NRNO, paqe 19 



Beware of parking in tx>w-away zones 



PARKING: Temporary signs 
had been ignored; contractors 
ask for 50 cars to be moved 



By Barikara Ortutay 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Students who parked their cars in the seem- 
ingly unenforced tow-away zone on Gayley 
(between Veteran and Strathmore) may have 
woken up to an unpleasant surprise on Friday 
and Monday morning. 

Around 10 a.m. Friday and 1 1 a.m. 
Monday, Los Angeles city parking enforce- 
ment towed every car parked along the north 
side of Gayley - 50 total. 

The signs say cars will be towed if they are 
parked in the zone from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Although some students who happened to 
be around managed to move their cars before 
they were towed, many others were in class 
and not aware of the situation. 

"My friend is taking two midterms right 
now, he didn't know about this," said David 
Smith, a third-year student. After he explained 
his friend's situation to the parking enforce- 
ment officers, they did not tow the car. 

The temporary tow-away zone signs have 
been up for over a week, but students have 
been parking there anyway because the no- 
parking zone has not been enforced. 

There were other no-parking signs up in 
connection with the De Neve Plaza project 
that have not been enforced consistently, 
either. 

"It's kind of unfair that they pick a random 
day to enforce a rule that they don't follow on 
other days," said second-year student Paul 
Milinsky, after successfully moving his car to 
the other side of the street. 

According to Ed Lloyd from Neilsen- 
Dellingham, the company in charge of the De 
Neve Plaza Project, the call to tow the cars 
came from Doty Brothers Development, the 
company employed by the L.A. department 
of transportation. 

Doty Brothers Development is employed 
by the city to construct a new sidewalk on 
Gayley and Strathmore. They have no con- 
nection to UCLA. 

According to Jeff Kaelar, a representative 
from the company that towed the cars, the 
zone was not enforced earlier because the con- 
struction did not reach the area until Friday, 
•o there was no need for the care to be moved. 

"The contractor calls the city and the city 
calls us," Kaelar said. 

Accordmg to city employee Wilbur 
'nrimhima, unleu parking enforcement regu- 




AAR0»fT0UT/O*ily Brum 

Despite posted signs, students have been parking in the temporary tow-away area 
along the east side of Gayley Avenue. 



larly patrols the area, the contractor renting 
the site must call to have a no-parking zone 
enforced. 

"Typically, a tow will not take place unless 
the contractor called to complain," he said. 

In addition to being charged with a $30 
ticket, students who had their cars towed will 
be charged for the co«t of the towing, which 
typically cosu $ 100 to S200. 



The towing drew a small group of disgrun- 
tled onlookers who were not parked on the 
street, but who did expcess their dissatisfac- 
tion with parking enforcement. 

"This sucks," said graduate student Angel 
Covarrubias. 

By Tuesday, construction on the side of the 
street began, so care were physically unable to 
park in the no-parking zone. 




RACHtL FAaOR 



SctUM^ 



17 




John Vidale is a niember of the research 
team that is investigating the Earth's core. 

Mantle magma 
answers some 
quake questions 

RESEARCH: Molten rock pools 
may help scientists ascertain 
causes of seismic disturbances 



By Matt Grace 

Daily Bmin Contributor ' 

On the other side of the globe, earthquakes 
greater than 6.0 on the Richter scale pound the 
tiny island of Tonga in the Southwest Pacific. 

At the same time they provide scientists on 
South Campus with unique insights into the solid- 
liquid interfaces governing the unpredictable 
activity of earthquakes. 

Using equipment originally designed to spy on 
the nuclear activities of Russia, John Vidale of 
UCLA and Michael Hedlin of UC San Diego 
have provided the strongest evidence to date for 
the existence of molten magma reservoirs, sus- 
pended thousands of miles beneath the earth's 
surface. 

"This is an incremental and important step in 
the characterization of the core-mantle bound- 
ary," said Jim Whitcomb, the program director 
for geophysics at the National Science 
Foundation. 

The military-subsidized network of 130 seis- 
mometers dotted over 60 square miles in south- 
ern Norway, detect faint seismic vibrations, cre- 
ated by anything from earthquakes to atomic 
bombs. 

The discovery of molten lakes of rxxrk - rough- 
ly the size of California - provide strong evidence 
against the earth's mantle consisting entirely of 
solid rock. 

The scientists based their analysis on seismic 
waves which p>assed through the mantle from 25 
earthquakes hitting Tonga in the last two decades. 

They found obstacles within the mantle which 
changed the direction of the seismic waves. If the 
mantle was confposed completely of solid rock, 
then the seismic waves would travel in a straight 
line. _ 

The existence of a liquidsolid interface ofTerr 
the only explanation for the discrepancies in seis- 
mic wave activity. 

"The melt scatters (the seismic waves) off in all 
directions," said John Vidate, asaociatf professor 



»7^ij7;|iij^*,M*»^''WHt).i^iit).-ij!^i^.'t4ifc-;j-i',^-^i i^a.i». 



S''< L ^-kt ]i'')i'i^,rJ^ir't\'^-'^^''.^^,P',^]i 



Thursday, Ffbniary 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin News 



- , ^-— --/ 



Daily Iruin News 



Thursday, February 19, 1998 



COMMUNITY BRIEFS 



Scientists develop way 
to regrow hip-bone 

A UCLA orthopedic surgeon has developed 
a new technique to treat bone death in human 
hips that may prevent the need for a total hip 
replacement. 

"In the 12 cases we've done since 1991, the 
procedure has obtained good to excellent pain 
relief for our patients," said Df. Jay Lieberman, 
assistant professor of orthopedic surgery and 
originator of the technique. "People who had 
* difficulty .walking across the room are now hik- 
ing, golfing and returning to fully active lives." 

Surgeons see about 20,000 cases of 
osteonecrosis, or "bone death," a year. It occurs 
when the blood supply feeding the head of the 
femur bone dies. The femoral head, the knobby 
end ofthe thighbone, fits into the hip socket. 

"Early intervention is importantj* ,, 
— ijeberman said. ,^ a significant amount -or?" 
bone dies, the femoral head eventually collapses 
under the weight ofthe hip joint." 

Lieberman's technique, called osteoregener- 



ation, is a modification of an already 
existing technique called core 
decompression. In core decompres- 
sion, the surgeon drills a hole into the 
femoral head and removes the dead bone inside 
to relieve pressure, restore blood flow and 
encourage new bone growth. 

In osteoregeneration, the surgeon also 
implants a capsule filled with a substance known 
as BMP, or bone-morphogenetic protein, which 
induces tl e body to grow new bone in replace- 
ment ofthe decayed bone. 

After implanting the capsule of BMP, 
Lfeberman implants an amount of purified 
human bone impregnated with BMP into the 
femoral head. 

Use of Internet u^ --^^ 
among business ^ * 

- ;; The Internet is becoming more popular with 
businesses. 

In Orange County alone, 92 percent of the 
companies are connected to the Internet. 




International companies, mostly 
high-tech firms, lead the country 
with 97 percent use. 
The portion of Orange County busi- 
nesses with a home page or site on the World 
Wide Web has leaped to 79 percent from 59 per- 
cent last year, more than doubling what it was 
two years ago, according to the UC Irvine 
Graduate School of Management's 1998 
Orange County Executive Survey. Among inter- 
national businesses, 86 percent have a web site, 
compared to 69 percent last year. 

With technology on the rise, using the 
Internet for e-mail alone has become a thing of 
the past. Although e-mail is still the chief form of 
Internet business support, many also ust it to 
communicate with employees, customers and 
supf^iers. 

Firms are increasingly providing access to 
their employees. This year, about 36 percent of 
employees have access to the Internet, com- 
pared to only 30 percent last year. 

Many executives cite efficiency and reduced 
cost of doing business as the main advantages of 
using the Internet. 



Federal committee says 
Berkeley discriminated 

The federal government has concluded that 
there is evidence UC Berkeley illegally discrimi- 
nated against a white male employee and retali- 
ated against him when he filed a complaint. 

The Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission also- found that the university's 
Department of Housing and Dining Services 
spun a web of lies t6 explain why it passed the 
employee up for promotion and punished him 
for filing his complaint. 

The EEOC "letters of determination" stem 
from a November 1995 complaint filed by Keii 
Crawford, a white male who is an on-call man- 
ager with the dining department. He was reject- 
ed for the position of dining services manage at 
the in 1994. Crawford, the dining services man- 
ager for the hall for the 1993-94 school year, said 
a lesser-qualified black male with no manage- 
ment experience was hired instead. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin staff and wire reports. 




byJInWodBric 




Suddenly, to George's horror, he realized that 
somehow they had gotten turned around and 
were retracing their steps I 



LESS THAN ONE WEEK LEFT: 

For undergraduates to 
change grading basis with a $3 
per-transaction fee. 

LESS THAN TWO WEEKS 
LEFT: 

Until UCLA billing statements 
are mailed. 

To file financial aid applica- 
tions for 1998-1999. 

For continuing students to file 
applications for undergraduate 
scholarships for 1998-1999. 

DONT FORGET: 

Undergraduate enrollment 
appointments have begun 
through URSA telephone. 

Need to talk? Call the peer' 
helpHne at 794-HELf>. 

The spring Schedule of 
Classes is r>ow on tele at the 
UCLA Store. 

Need an escort? Call 794- 
WALK. 



WHAT'S BRE WIN' TODAY 






Thursday 

UCLA Orientation Program 

Orientation Assistant Positions 

Available 

Come pick up an application 

Applications due February 27th 

201 Covel Commons 

Women's Resource Center- 
Catalyst Mentorship Program 
What does a research scientist do 
and why? Discover what research 
entails. Discuss how generating 
questions and the development of 
research methodology. Learn 
about the many rewards of , 
scientific reserach. 
Dodd Hall 2 • 825-3945 



•^e-; 



Noon 

Spartacus Youth Club 
Speakout: U.S. Get Your Bloody 
Hands Orriraq! 
MeyerhofT Park, in front of 
KerckhofTHall • (213) 380-8239 

University Catholic Center 
Communion service (12: 10) 
KerckholTI52 ~ 



2*11.111. 



Association 
Consulting night 
UCLA Career Center 

Oikos Christian Fellowship 
Weekly meeting (6:30) 
Kinsey 51 • 231-0777 



7 p.m. 

Ballroom Dance Club at UCLA 

Tango lessons 

Ackerman 2408 • 284-3636 

Career Center 
"Money Talks: Salary 
Negotiation and Benefits'* 
workshop ' 
Career Center 

Regent's Scholar Society 
Winter social 

Sunset Village Courtside Lounge 
C-8 • 824-3808 

Hedrick Hall Multicultural 
Programming Committee 
Reflections of African American 
Musics from 1920s to 1990s 
Featuring Reggie Waddcll 
Hedrick Main Lounge 



Armenian Students Association 
Lecture by Prof Sarafian and 
Prof Kariser on the Ottoman 
Archives in Turkey 
Ackerman 3517 -206-9124 

4 p.m. 

Department of East Asian 
Languages and Cultures 
and Center for the Study of 
Women 

"Nu-Shu: Women Poets of 
Hunan" - RSVP (4:30) 
Video documentary and lecture 
Faculty Center, Sequoia Room 
206^94 

5 p.m. 

John Paul II Society 
Christian Feminism 
Ackerman 2408 • 208-0941 

Career Center 

"Personal Stories: Disclosing 
Your Disability" workshop 
Career Center -206-9121 

6 p.m. 

Latina/o Business Student 



Taiwanese American Union • 

Cultural Night Fashion Show 

rehearsal 

1 1666 Montana Ave. #203 

362-4172 



Friday 1p.m. 

Jacob Marschak 

Interdisclipinary Colloquium 

"Predicting Economic 

Recessions in the United States" 

by Vladimir Krilis-Borok of 

UCLA 

AGSM C-301 • 825-4144 

Environmental Coalition 

Documentary movie about 

human rights and democracy in 

Burma 

Ackerman 2408 • 206-4438 

7 p.m. 

Catholic Students Association 

Mardi-Gras Party 

Price: $3nonmembers, $1 

members 

840 Hilgard Ave. -208-5015 ' 

What's Brewin' can be reached via e-mail 
at whatsbfewin9media.ucla.edu 





Every Thursday, the 
Daily Bruin takes a look 



at members of the 



UCLA community. In 
^ this continuing series, 
we highlight the many 



different activities 
Bruins are involved in. 



BREWIN' 

Coffehouse manager Dave Newlove 
makes sure students get their espresso 




ByMchdcNavano 

Dally Bruin Staff , , 

If there is anyone who would benefit from cloning, it*s 
Dave Newlove. Keeping KerckhofF Coffeehouse, the 
Kerckhoff Patio Cart and Viewpoint Cafe all running 
smoothly requires the coflcehouse manager to be every- 
where all at once. 

Caught in the blender of KerckhofT Hall, Newlove is con- 
stantly running up, down and all around, giving orders to all 
the employees, occasionally helping out during rushes and 
making sure the espresso has just the right taste. 

"So many drinks are based on espresso, so it's important 
that it's right," he said, adding milk to a small plastic cup full 
of espresso. "Milk takes away the bitterness, but if it's 
brewed wrong, you still get the bitter taste. The humidity and 
temperature affect how it comes out, it's the most tempera- 



mental thing." 

It's the details like those that Newlove must always 
remember. 

"I've done it for so long," Newlove said, "it's almost like 
second nature to me." 

And it's a good thing remembering comes easy, because 
when the line began to form upstairs in KerckhofT at 7 a.m., 
on a typical day for Newlove, he had to be ready. He'd 
already woken up two hours before to make it there on time 
and get everything set up. 

So even before the saggy-eyed ASUCLA employees and 
students queued up for their much-needed dose of caffeine 
and even before the sun rose, Newlove started his day. 

"I go to work in the dark and go home in the dark," he 
said, mentioning he usually doesn't return home until 7 p.m. 

Sec HAL UUmS, page 17 




(Top) David N«wk>ve, 

manager of several 

coffeehouses on 

canf)pus, chats with a 

customer while ringing 

up an order. 

(Right) N«wlove has 

worked for ASUCLA for 

eight years. 

(Far right) With speed 

and expertise, 

N«w1ov« whips up a 

coffee drink, one of 

hundreds sold every 

day. 



The Daily Bruin (ISSN 10*0-5<MO) ii published and copyrighted by the ASUCLA Communicatioos Board. All rights arc reserved. Reprlntirvg of any material in this publication without the written permission of the Comnumications Board Itatrictly prohibited. The 
ASUCLA Communications Board f uHy supports the University of California's policy on r>on-discrimination The student media reserve tfic right to reject or rrMxIIfy advertising whose content dlKrimihates on tfie basis of arKestry, color, national origin, race, letlglofi. 
disability, age, sex or sexual orientation. The ASUCLA Communications Board has a media grievance procedure for resoivir>g complaints against any of its publications. For a copy of the complete procedure, contact the publications offke at 1 1 8 Kerckhoff Hall. All 
inserts ttiat ui* printed in the Daily Bruin mtt ir>deper>dently paid publications and do r>ot reflect the views of the Editorial Board or the staff 

, lit Iterckhoff Hal, MM Wfe i twood Man, Let An«ai«*, CA •0024, (310) BSS-MM, h«p-7/www.4alhrbruin4icla.e<lu, tax (310) 20»m90« ^%~ 



/ur..^, Lnlertainment:82!;-2538; Ncws:825 2795; Sp5rts:825 9851; Viewpoint;825-221G, CIciv.ifird Line.825 2221; CIcissified Di'>plc)y.200-i060, Sdlcs; 



i 





4 Thursday, February 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin Newt 



Daily Bruin Newj 



Thursday, February 19, 1998 5 



Renovated Treehouse will weicome Rubiols, La Qicina WORLD &( NATION 




Dow Jones Industrials 


Nasdaq Indci 


up: 52.56 


up: 12.30 


close: 8451.06 


close: 1715.73 



DoNar 

Yen: 126.17 
Mark: 1.8206 



ASUCLA: Goal of current 
privatization is to best 
serve UCLA community 



ByMichMWdncr 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

ASUCLA has negotiated con- 
tracts with Rubio's Baja Grill and La 
Cucina to renovate Treehouse and 
op>en restaurants there next fall. 

Rubio's Baja Grill, a Mexican 
restaurant, specializes in fish tacos, 
but also offers a variety of other 
Mexican foods. La Cucin^is a fresh 
pasta restaurant operated by the 
halian-food chain Sbarro. 

Rubio's and La Cucina will 
^rplace The Market Place, 
Mainstreet, C&C Company and 
Pasta Resistance - the restaurants 
which currently reside in Treehouse. 
They will close at the end of the year. 

ASUCLA bbard member Jim 



Friedman said that Rubio's will 
become a cohesive part of the cam- 
pus community. 

"One of the most appealing things 
was their desire to work with us on 
the campus," said Friedman, the 
association's food services strategy 
committee chair. 

Currently, Treehouse sandwich 
lines are only open during lunch. 
Employees will still have jobs in food 
services when Rubio's and La 
Cucina move in. The two restaurants 
also plan to hire students. _ji:^ 

"They are committed to hiring stu- 
dents and doing things that reflect 
the market they're in," Friedman 
said. 

Friedman said that Sbarro will 
design La Cucina's menu in accor- 
dance with students' needs and 
wants, although both new menus will 
be more expensive. 

"They were willing to define a 
menu based on what they do and 
what we want," Friedman said. 



The two restaurants will pay for 
the renovation of Treehouse over the 
summer and be ready for opening in 
the fall. 

"The Treehouse was built in 1961 
and it definitely showed its age," said 
Terence Hsiao, ASUCLA business 
development director. "We weren't 
in a financial position to renovate it." 

"(The contracts with the restau- 
rants) allow us to do more things 
because it frees us of the obligation 
to renovate Treehouse," he contin- 
ued. 

ASUCLA Executive Director 
Patricia Eastman said that the 
strongest impetus for bringing in the 
new restaurants was the need to ren- 
ovate Treehouse. 

"That's the real reason we sought 
outsiders," Eastman said. 

Last spring, ASUCLA surveyed 
the campus, asking students what 
changes they would like to see in 
food services. 

"We tried to think of what people 



wanted based on the food service 
survey," Friedman said. "What they 
wanted was fresh, healthy food." 

In addition, students desired 
Mexican food, pasta, and rotisserie 
chicken. Friedman said that ASU- 
CLA is currently looking into open- 
ing a chicken restaurant in the 
Coo|>erage, possibly in the space cur- 
rently occupied by De Nucvo, since 
there will not be a need for two 
Mexican restaurants in the same 
building. 

Hsiao said that the privatization of 
Treehouse will not start a trend for 
if^SUCLA food services. He believes 
it is important to maintain a mix of 
students' association restaurants and 
private restaurants. 

"The basic strategy we're pursuing 
is that the campus is best served by 
having ASUCLA's own restaurants 
and a few selected outside opera- 
tors," Hsiao said. 

Hsiao also said that the contracts 
with Rubio's and La Cucina are sim- 



ilar to the current contract with 
Panda Express, which was brought 
in when ASUCLA felt it could not 
fulfill students' needs. 

"We had developed an Asian food 
line that was not well received, so we 
brought in Panda Express," Hsiao 
said. 

But Hsiao emphasized that priva- 
tizing all of food services would not 
be in the best interests of the ASU- 
CLA because it would lose the flexi- 
bility to change. 

"Once you get yourself into an 
agreement with someone, you lock 
yourself in for a fairly extended peri- 
od of time," Hsiao said. 

He also said that complete privati- 
zation would not contribute to the 
atmosphere that ASUCLA wants to 
maintain. 

"If every(fiing is a McDonald's, or 
Carl's Jr., or a Kentucky Fried 
Chicken, there's a real loss there in 
terms of UCLA's sense of place," 
Hsiao said. 



Bomber crashes on training mission 



ACODEfiT: One airman, 
no civilians injured by 
downing of B-IB Lancer 



ByTcdBfidb 
The Associated Press 

MARION, Kentucky - Four 
crew members of an Air Force 
bomber on a training mission para- 
chuted to safety moments before the 
plane crashed and exploded 
Wednesday in a muddy cow field in 
western Kentucky. 

The plane flew about 10 miles 
after the crew members ejected. 

Two walked to a phone and called 
for help, while another was found 
walking on a road. The fourth's 
parachute caught in a tree and he 
suflered head and neck injuries. All 
four were taken to the hospital; their 
conditions were not immediately 
known. 

The B-l B bomber was flying out 
of Dyess Air Force Base near 
Abilene, Texas, when it went down 
near Mattoon, a rural area five miles 
northeast of Marion near the-Qhio 
River, said First Lt. Eric Elliott of 
Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. 



The bomber was not being dis- 
patched to the Persian Gulf and was 
not carrying munitions. Air Force 
ofi*icials said. 

Military police from Fort 
Campbell, Ky., were securing the 
scene. There was no immediate 
word as to a cause. State police said 
the plane went down around 1:15 
p.m. 

Mark Williams, who lives about a 
quarter mile away, said he was pick- 
ing up his mail when he heard an 
explosion, looked up and saw a 
mushr(X)fn-shaped cloud. The blast 
shook his pickup truck. 

Williams drove to the crash site 
and said the biggest piece of wreck- 
age could fit in the bed of his pickup, 
while the rest was reduced to pieces 
slightly larger than a dinner plate. 

Jamie Riley saw the plane pass 
over the town of Mexico, about 14 
miles from the crash site, and told 
the weekly Crittenden J*ress that the 
bomber was about 200 feet above 
the treelops. 

"I don't see how it was high 
enough for anybody to bail out," 
Riley said. 

Beverly Herrin told the newspa- 
per the engines quit near^arion. 

"I heard it roaring and looked 



toward Marion," he said. "By the 
time it came into sight, everything 
was quiet. It was gliding at Ibout a 
20-degree angle." 

Designed in the 1970s as a 
nuclear bomb-dropper, the plane 
has been converted since then for 
conventional missions and is being 
deployed to the Mideast for the first 
time in a potential combat role. 

Last September, a pilot's attempt 
to perform an uncommon but per- 
missible maneuver led to a crash of a 
B-IB bomber that killed all four peo- 
ple tdboard. 

The Air Force reported in 
December that the pilot of the $200 
million plane was making a sharp 
right turn during a Sept. 19 training 
mission on the Montana prairie 
when the plane neared stall speed 
and crashed. The technique is 
uncommon, but not forbidden. 

That crash was the sixth military 
air disaster in a seven-day pericxJ, 
and it prompted an unprecedented 
24-hour grounding of military 
planes for safety training. 

However, at 1.37 crashes per 
100,000 flying hours in the fiscal 
year ending Sept. 30, the Air Force 
reported it had its fourth safest year 
ever. 1_ . .1 



After 56 years, memories 
of Japanese camps live on 



INTERNMENT: Younger 
generations hope pains 
will never happen ag^n 



ByhnbtrtNlalthee , 

Setttie f^Kt-l^te«igencer 

Fifty-six years ago today. President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt signed 
Executive Order 9066 leading to the 
i;docation and internment of 120,000 
people of Japanese ancestry on the 
West Coast. Seven out of 10 were U.S. 
citizens. 

Thousands of Japanese American 
families in Washington State were 
among the victims of what a 1983 pres- 
idential c(^mission called racism, 
wartime hysteria and a lack of political 
leadership in the wake of the Japanese 
attack on Pearl Harbor. 

They came from Bainbridge Island, 
Bellevue, Renion, Tukwila, Kent, 
Auburn, Sumner, Tacoma and down- 
town Seattle. In community after com- 
munity, they were first evacuated to the 
Puyallup Fairgrounds and later trans- 
ported to one of 10 relocation camps m 
seven states. 
' Aside from their freedom and con- 





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stitutional rights, they lost careers, 
homes, famis, stores, personal proper- 
ty and the feeling of belonging to a 
nation. 

In August 1988, aAer a decade-long 
campaign led by the Japanese- 
American Citizens League, Congress 
passed a bill offering a formal apology 
and payments of $20,000 to every sur- 
viving internee. 

But most contini|e to remember 
• their wartinxf incarceration and believe 
that speaking out about this dark chap- 
ter in their country's past may help pre- 
vent it from happening in the future. 

Here arc a handful of their stories: 

•Tama Tokuda couldn't believe 
what was happening. 

The *77-year-old widow from 
Beacon Hill was 21 at the time her fam- 
ily was evacuated. She was a student at 
the University of Washington. Her 
father had a clothing store in the 
International District on a site that is 
now a post office, kitty-cornered from 
the Uwajimaya grocery store. 

"We were living a normal life," she 
said. "All of a sudden, some of my 
friends' fathers disappeared (arrested 
as suspected or potential spies) and we 

S«c ANNIVEIISARY, page 14 



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Deng Xiaoping leaves legacy of unfinished reform 



CHINA: One year after 
leader's death, country 
ponders new direction 



By Charles Hutzler 

The Associated Press 

BEIJING - Spotting the green- 
uniformed police, two dozen 
scruffy-looking men fled their 
daily chore of seeking work. 

'Finding a job is really hard,' 



T 



one breathless fugitive, a farmer 
named Cui, said before hurdling 
over the side of an overpass and 
scurrying down a bank to seek 
cover under the bridge. 

Job-seeking migrants such as 
Cui are among the most common 
by-products of China's reforms. 
Crowding into already clogged 
cities by the tens of millions, they 
form the darker side of a legacy 
that has raised skyscrapers and 
incomes across what was one of 
the world's poorest countries. 

In the year since the Feb. 19, 
1997, death of reformist patriarch 
Deng Xiaoping, the unintended 
effects of his two-decade effort 
have worsened. Corruption 
remains rampant, gaps between 
the newly rich and bedrock poor 
are widening, unemployment is 
soaring and social ills such as pros- 
titution and drug abuse are 
spreading. 

"Der^g Xiaoping was the archi- 
tect, but he solved only the prob- 
lems of the first period of reform. 
He left behind a lot of other ones 
for his successors to solve," said 
Wang Shan, an author and politi- 
cal commentator. " 




Thf AitocKied Ptm 



Chinese leader D«ng Xiaoping died while implenr>enting reforms. 



A man of Deng's revolutionary 
credentials ^d achievements 
commands influence even in 
death, and his political heirs in the 
ruling Communist Party are not 



letting Thursday's anniversary of 
his passing go quietly. 

In ways solemn and kitsch, 
China is celebrating the man and 
the statesman. Stamps, video com- 



pact discs and books bearing his 
likeness and words are being pro- 
duced. Symposiums on his policies 
are being held. Even an exhibition 
of portraits done in needlepoint 
embroidery has been staged. 

"We stand on the great mans 
shoulders. The great man's shoul- 
ders carry the hopes of one peo- 
ple," intoned the party's flagship 
newspaper. People's Daily, in a 
front-page homage Wednesday. 



Jiang Zemin and his p- 

colleagues are taking 

risks Deng Xioaping 

contemplated but 

never dared. 



The thrust behind the memori- 
als - syrupy, sentimental ones 
included - is the same concept. 
Deng's heirs are seeking legitima- 
cy in his mantle and pushing ahead 
with more pragmatic economic 
reforms. 

People's Daily listed the new 
leadership's successes in the post- 
Deng year: the smooth recovery of 
Hong Kong, President Jiang 
Zemin's red-carpet welcome at the 
White House and a landmark 
party congress that launched an 
ambitious program to revitalize 
state industries. 

By bringing capitalist reforms 
to state enterprises, relics of the 
era of central planning that 
employ two-thirds of the urban 

SceDENCpagelS 



Hsia indicted for hiding illegal campaign contributions 



FUND-RAISING: Buddhist 
temple disguised funds 
for Democrats, jiury says 



By MklMMlJ. Sniffcn 
The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON A federal 
grand jury charged Democratic 
fund-raiser M«ria Hsia on 
Wednesday with disguismg illegal 
campaign contributions by a 



California Buddhist temple to the 
Clinton-Gore re-election campaign 
and other politicians between 1993 
and. 1996. 

The second indictment brought 
by the Justice Department's cam- 
paign finance task force was hailed 
by Attorney General Janet Reno as 
"yet another step forward"* in her 
investigation of finance abuses dur- 
ing the 1996 election. Reno has been 
under Republican fire for refusing 
to hand the case to an independent 
counsel. 



The Hsi Lai Temple, located in 
the Los Angeles suburb of Hacienda 
Heights, Cahf., was named as an 
unindicted co-conspirator. Formally 
incorporated as the International 
Buddhist Progress Society, the tem- 
ple is a tax-exempt religious organi- 
zation barred from participating in 
any political campaign. Political 
contributions from corporations 
also are illegal. 

The long-anticipated Hsia indict- 
ment has been cited by political 
observers as a potential problem for 



Vice President Al Gore and his 
ambition to seek the presidency in 
2000. Gore was not charged in the 
case, but the indictment mentioned 
three fund-raisers that he attended 
and two that Clinton attended for 
which the grand jury charged Hsia 
raised disguised contributions. 

Three temple nuns told a Senate 
committee last fall the temple illegal- 
ly reimbursed donors after an April 
1996 fund-raiser that Gore attended 

S«e INDICTIIIIIT, page 12 



UN. diief hopes 
for sucxiessful 
Baghdad visit 
with Huss^ 

IRAQ: U.S. officials warn 
council that not just any 
settlement is acceptable 

^y Robert H.Rcid 



The Associated Press ■ 

UNITED NATIONS - The U.N. 
chief said Wednesday he will meet — 
Saddam Hussein jn Baghdad with 
the full support of the 15-member 
Security Council and that he was 
leaving with a "reasonable chance of 
success." 

"I'm happy that on this issue, at 

this critical stage, the unanimity of 

the council has been re-established, 
and that they are behind what I'm 
going to Baghdad to do," Secretary- 
General Kofi Annan told reporters ;_ 
aAer he briefed the council on the 
trip. ^ . 

Annan said he was also encour- 
aged by signals he was receiving ' 
from Baghdad "that they are pre- 
pared to engage constructively to 
find a solution." 

He cautioned that "it is a difficult 
mission coming at a very critical 
juncture." 

Annan noted that he had said in 
the past that "I needed to have a rea- 
sonable chance of success before I 
left, and that is whp I'm leaving." 

Despite the council's support, 
British and U.S. officials have cau- 
tioned that they won't accept any 
settlement that would dilute the 
power of the U.N. Special i 
Commission on Iraq, which is 
charged with carrying out the 
weapons inspections. 

The secretary-general announced > 
his decision to go to Baghdad on ^ ' 
Tuesday, hours after President 

Clinton laid the groundwork for a 

p>ossible air strike to force Iraqi com- I 
pliance. 

"He has our full support and ^ — ■ 
Godspeed, but it's up to Iraq to com- 
ply," U.S. Ambassador Bill 
Richardson said Wednesday. "If 
Iraq does not comply, there are 
going to be some very, very serious 
consequences." 

And, though the United States 

Sec WMm N/mONS^ page 13 



WORLD & NATION BRIEFS 



Vatican opposed 
to frozen embryos 

VATICAN CITY - The Vatican newspa- 
per said Wednesday there were some "positive 
aspects" to the birth of a child from an embryo 
frozen for 7 1/2 years, but condemned the fer- 
tility techniques used in his conception. 

An 8-pound, 15-ounce infant born in 
California on Monday came from an embryo 
frozen in 1989 after his parents underwent fer- 
tility treatments. 

They had a son in 1990 after the treatments, 
then forgot about the frozen embryo until last 
year. They decided to have a second child 
rather than destroy the embryo. 

L'Osservatore Romano, the Vatican news- 
paper, praised the decision of the couple to 
have a second child and also approved that the 
child was born to his natural parents into an 
apparently loving home. 

It said these positive aspects do not exempt 
the case from the church's negative judgment 



on such fertility procedures. 

Pope John Paul II has denounced 
in vitro fertilization and hormonal 
treatments on post-menopausa 
women and has called for an end to the 
production of frozen embryos, equating their 
destruction to abortion. 

No criminal charges to 
be filed in ferry disaster 

STOCKHOLM, Sweden - The investiga- 
tion into the Estonia ferry disaster that killed 
852 people is being closed without any crimi- 
nal indictments filed, a prosecutor said today. 

"I'm not saying that nobody did anything 
wrong, only that I did not find anyone who was 
criminally careless," prosecutor Tomas 
Lindstrand said, according to the Swedish 
news agency, TT. 

The Estonia sank on Sept. 28. 1994, on a 
trip to Stockholm from the Estonian capital of 
Tallinn. The ferry's visor-style bow door was 




torn off by heavy seas and water 
poured into the ship's vehicle deck. 
A Swedish-Finnish-Estonian com- 
mission investigating the causes of the 
disaster cited poor lock design and slow 
response by the ferry's crew. 

Another investigation, commissioned by 
the boat's builder, the Meyer Werft company 
of Hamburg, Germany, blamed poor mainte- 
n4nceof theship. 

Lawsuits brought by survivors and victims' 
relatives are pending against Meyer WerA, the 
French Bureau Veritas classification agency 
that certified the ship, and Sweden's national 
maritime administration. 

Bookseller charged 
with child pornography 

MONTGOMERY. Ala. - An Alabama 
grand jury indicted the nation's largest book- 
seller, Barnes & Noble, on child pornography 
charges involving the sale of books by noted 



photographers whose work includes pictures 
of nude children. 

State Attorney General Bill Pryor said 
Wednesday he started the grand jury investiga- 
tion after receiving complaints about two 
books being sold at Barnes & Noble stores in 
Alabama: "The Age of Innocence" by French 
photographer David Hamilton and "Radiant 
Identities" by San Francisco photographer 
Jock Sturges. 

The indictment accuses the New York- 
based company of disseminating "obscene 
material containing visual reproduction of 
persons under 17 years of age involvetf in 
obscene acts." 

The indictment was returned by the grand 
jury Feb. 6 but ,not made public until 
Wednesday. It involves 15 counts over the sale 
of "The Age of Innocence" and 1 7 counts over 
the sale of "Radiant Identities." If Barnes & 
Noble is convicted, the company could be 
fined up to S 10,000 on each of the 32 counts. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin wire reports. . 



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Thursday, Febiuary 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin News 



STATE & LOCAL 



El Nino's unfailing wrath 
keeps busy bees away 



AGRICULTURE: Farmers 
worry, try to prepare foi: 
increasing crop damage 



ByJoeBigham 

The Associated Press 

FRESNO, Calif. - If El Nifto 
storms keep pounding California, 
farmers won*t be abte to pHant vegeta- 
bles on time, and bees won't poHiqate 
fruit and nut blossoms properly. 

So far, a series of February storms 
has caused only minor damage to the 
state's $24.5 billion agribusiness indus- 
try. But growers worry about a 
National Weather Service prediction 
that rain will keep falling off and on all 
spring in a slate where the sun usually 
shines pretty steadily after March. 

"If this keeps up and keeps growers 
from planting vegetable crops or corn 
for dairies, it could have a ripple efl'ect 
through the entire agriculture econo- 
my," Central California nurseryman 
Bob Driver said Wednesday. 

The most immediate concern is for 
almonds, a $1 billion crop in which 
trees are blooming right now for bees 
to pollinate. However, when it rains, 
bees huddle in their hives instead of 
buzzing around the trees. 

Skies were clear Wednesday, but 
thei:e was a threat of rain for Thursday 
with more storms piled up in the 
Pacific to discourage bees imd knock 
blooms ofl' trees. 

"We need two more weeks like this 
to pollinate all varieties," Driver siiid of 
the good weather. 

Lettuce growers* in Siitlnas Valley, 
dubbed the nation's Salad Bowl, also 
need relief from coastal squalls. 



Continued El Nino rains would disrupt 
normal planting schedules, says 
Michael Boggiatto, who harvests and 
markets for lettuce growers. 

"As rains continue, and ground con- 
tinues to be too wet to work up and 
plant, there's a possibility that there 
may be some gaps in production," 
Boggiatto said. 

Some farmers in Arizona and New 
Mexico who usually plant other crops 
have switched to lettuce, anticipating 
shortages in California's $735 million 
crop, he added. . 

"There could be overproduction at 
some time slots because of these people 
coming in with product who wouldn't 
normally have it," Boggiatto said. 

SoDthern California strawberries 
have been hit hardest by the rains to 
date, sustaining $10.7 million damage, 
according to state Department of Food 
and Agriculture statistics. But growers 
expect rain this time of year and lay out 
their fields so they'll drain well, said 
Theresa Thorne of the California 
Strawberry Commission. 

"Every year, they gel rain, and they 
plan for it." Thome said. "It's part of 
the equation, so if anybody can survive 
El Nino. I think it will be strawberry 
farmers." 

The statewide loss for all crops has 
reached $65.6 million, far bdow the 
$748.6 million damage from a pair of 
bjMtal storms in 1995 and $245 million 
from extensive flooding around New 
Yciir's Day last year. 

But farmers still fret about the 
future after learning that California is 
Hcely to endure El Niiio -storms for 
weeks, perhaps months. 

"The lasl Ihirt^ of El Niiio is the 
wctlesl."'Wgriculliire weather forecast- 
er John HiNer told a group of farmers. 



Ads lure unsuspecting immigrants 



OIEATING: Suspicious 
«)mpanies being sued 
for deceptive advertising 



ByJuHcdMO 

San Francisco Examiner 

SAN FRANCISCO - Untold 
numbers of unscrupulous immigra- 
tion consultants are preying on 
poor, powerless immigrants in 
Culjfornia, several lawyers say, 

"It's a huge problem," said 
Kathleen Michon, an attorney at the 
Public Counsel Law Center in Los 
Angeles. "You can walk down any 
street in a poor neighborhood or 
neighborhood of immigrants and 
see signs posted" for immigration 
services. 



A complaint filed ... 

accuses Master 

International Service 

of deceptive 

advertising. 



The jmraigrants make easy tar- 
gets because they either speak little 
English and are unsure how to com- ' 
plain to authorities or are illegal 
themselves and afraid to contact 
police. Authorities say the problem 
has proliferated in the past few years 
with record numbers of immigrants 
applying for naturalization, many in 
a panic over welfare and immigra- 
tion reform. ' 



No immigrant community is 
immune. Prosecution can be prob- 
lematic. 

"They're hard to find," said Sara 
Campos, an attorney with the 
Lawyers' Committee for Civil 
Rights in San Francisco who heads a 
task force working with local prose- 
cutors to identify and investigate 
suspicious companies. "They're fly- 
by-night operations. They're here 
today, gone tomorrow." 

A smaH San Francisco law firm 
specializing in immigration has sued 
two companies it suspects of cheat- 
ing customers. 

A complaint filed Friday in San 
Francisco Superior Court accuses 
Master International Service of 
deceptive advertising and unfair 
business practices. 

Master's ads boast that it can get 
political asylum and then a green 
card in six months. Attorney Steve 
Baughman of the law firm 
Baughman & Wang said a one-year 
wait is the federally mandated mini- 
mum to get a green card after first 
obtaining political asylum. 

"They're luring these ^ople in 
with these sexy offers which none of 
us can match, then don't come 
through," Baughman said. 

A Superior Court judge^anted a 
temporary restraining order that 
restricts Master from continuing 
immigration services and withdraw- 
ing funds from its bank accounts. 

Baughman said he decided to sue, 
with himself as the plaintiff, because 
a former Master customer who said 
he was cheated was too intimidated 
to sue. 

k Yinan Zhang, a Beijing native 
who opened Master last April, said 
in an interview Tuesday that his ads 



were completely honest. He 
explained that the recommendation 
for approval of a green card - not 
the actual green card - is what he 
can get in six months. 

"I think they're suing because 
they're jealous," Zhang said. "Some 
cases they can't handle so the cus- 
tomer comes to us." 

Justin Wang, Baughman's law 
partner, said his firm stood to gain 
nothing financially by suing, but "we 
feel we need to send a warning to 
these people." 

Zhang vowed to fight the suit. 

Baughman & Wang filed suits 



"I think they're suing 

because they're 

jealous." 

Yinan Zhang 

Master International Service 



alleging fraud and negligence 
against a second company, AN 
Enterprise, last fall on behalf of two 
former AN clients. After unsuccess- 
fully challenging the suit for several 
months, AN Enterprise suddenly 
closed last month and its owners dis- 
appeared. 

AN's ads in the Chinese-language 
World Journal described the cotnpa- 
ny as a "Sino-American Legal 
Center" that could provide "express 
green cards." 

"They submit phony documents 
and make promises that are simply 
impossible to fulfill," Baughman 
said. 



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My Bruin News 



Thursday, February 19, 1998 



What's 



This Week ? 



Thursday. February 19 



i=Hm Series 

Night Nurse 

7:30 PM, James Bridges Theater 
$6 general, $4 student 
Part of the on-going series 
' "Archive Treasures". Preceded 
l>y the animated short Bosko's 
Holiday, t^race Heidt and His 
Californians, and a flearst 
Metrotone News from 1931. 
Screening info: 206-FiLM 

Movie 

Soul Food 

7 PM and 9:30 PM 
Ackerman Grand Ballroom 
$2 
' Additional Info: 825-1958 



Friday. February 20 



Live Performance arKf 
CenterStage Lecture 

Margaret Jenkins 

Dance Company 

with the Paul Dresner 

Ensemble 

"Fault" 

8 PM. 

Veterans Wadsworth Theater 

$30, $27, general, $9 student, 

IIICIT 

Jenkins' expk>sive new work 

depk^ts seismic metapfK>rs - tx)th 

geologic and emotional - in 

beautiful landscapes of 

movement. This renowned San 

Francisco- based dance company 

explores the physical language of 

rupture, slippage and resistance. 

The program features an origirutl 

score t>y Alvin Curran and David 

Lang. 

Ticket info: 825-2101 

CenterStage Lecture - 7 PM 
Margaret Jenkins, Artiste Director 
performance tickets required 
Additional info: 20S-1144 




\ 



Movie 

Soul Food* 

7 PM and 9:30 PM 
Ackemnan Grand Ballroom 

Additional Info: a2fr-195^ 

WlM*! AM TWi WMk? it yaw «Mkly IMMiW 



Your Weekly Guide to On-campus Art: Related Events 



Saturday. February 21 



Live Performance and 
CenterStage Lecture 

Leon Bates 

8 PM, Schoenberg Hall 
$25 general, $10 student, 
MMillCKEn 
One of America's leading 
pianists, Bates has performed in 
many of the world's most 
prestigious halls and with major 
symphony orchestras. An 
evening of Brahms, Beethoven, 
Rachmaninoff and Chopin. 
Ticket info: 825-2101 

CenterStage Lecture - 7 PM 
Leon Bates, Artist 
performance tickets required 
Additional info: 206-1144 




Live Performarxie and 
CenterStage Lecture 

Margaret Jenkins 

Dance Company 

with the Paul Dresner 

Ensemble 

"Fault" 

see Friday, F6bruary20 
FNm Series 

The Ballad of 

Narayama 

(Narayama-bushi ko) 

7 PM, James Bridges Theater 
$6 general, $4 student 
"Porno Man and Insect Woman: 
The Films of Shohei Imamura" 
film series. 

Screening info: 206-FiLiM 



Sunday. February 22 



Film Series 

Endless Desire 
(Hateshi naki yokubo) 

Stolen Desire 
(Nusumareta yokujo) 

7 PM, James Bridges Theater 
$6 general, $4 student 
"Porno Man and Insect Woman: 
The Films of Shohei Imamura" 
film series. 

ScrMning Info: 206-FILM 



Live Performance and 
CenterStage Lecture 

Diana Krall 

7 PM, 

Veteran Wadsworth Theater 
$28, $25 general, $11 student 
The recent buz2 for this exciting 
young jazz pianist and vocalist 
has been almost deafening. Still 
basking in the success of her pre- 
vious albums, Diana Krall was 
nominated for a "Best Jazz 
Vocalrsf Grammy award in 1996, 
and this summer her newest 
release, "Love Scenes" shot to 
the No. 1 slot on Billboard's 
traditional jazz chart. In her 
languorous, smoky vocals, Krall 
perfomis works from her latest 
album. 

Ticket info: 825-2101 

CenterStage Lefture - 6 PM 
Diana KraH, Russell Mak>ne & 
Ben Wolfe, Artists 
perfonvance tickets required 
Additional info: 20S-1144 




Musk: Series 



UCLA Gluck Fellows 
Jazz Combo 

2 PM, Amnand Hammer Museum 
Frfe 

"Worid in Music - UCLA Gluck 
Music Series." 
Additional Info: 443-7000 or 
hmrinfo9ucia.edu 



Monday. February 23 



"Musk: and Char 

Diana Krall ^ 

12 to 1PM. 

Schoenberg Hall, Room 1 343 
Free 

Grammy nominated "Best Jazz 
Vocalist," Krall will meet with 
students to discuss her 
performance style and history. 
Live performance, Sunday, 
February 22nd. 
Reaervationa raquirad: 206-1144 



DenwnstratkKi 

Leon Bates 

1 to 2 PM, John Wooden Center 
Free 

One of America's leading pianists 
is also a bodyt>uilder! Join Bates 
as he bench presses and per- 
forms a recital in the gym while 
discus|ihg the similarities 
between the discipline of tx>dy- 
building and piano playing. 
Live performance, Saturday, 
February 21st. 
Reservations required: 206-1144 



Tuosdny February 24 



Film Series 

Tell It To The Marines 
Way Out West 

7:30 PM, James Bridges Theater 
$6 general, $4 student 
Film & Television Archive is proud 
to present a selection of William 
Haines' silent and sound film 
work in conjunction with the 
continue next column 



publication of Wisecracker: The 
Lite and Times of William Haines, 
Hollywood's First Openly Gay 
Star by William Mann. 
Introduction by William Mann. 
Screening info: 206-FILM 

Live Performance and 
CenterStage Lecture 

Bartok Quartet ' 
Bartok Cycle 

8 PM, Schoenberg Hall 
$25 single performance, 
$40 both performances, 
$9 student 

Since its founding in 1957 with 
memt)ers from the Franz Liszt 
Academy of Music in Budapest, 
the Bartok Quartet has ranked at 
the top of all renowned chamber 
groups 

Program I - Quartets 1 . 2, 4 
Ticket info: 825-2101 

CenterStage Lecture - 7 PM 
Peter Komk>s, vmlinist 
performance tickets required 
Additional Info: 206-1144 



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Wednesday. February 25 



Live Performance and 
CenterStage Lecture.^ 

Bartok Quartet 
Bartok Cycle 



> (4(i*i»-».'.-i.w*j*#*tw%jji*r. *i 



see Tuesday, February 24 — 
Program II - Quartets 3, 5, 6 
Ticket info: 825-2101 




S6A TICKETS 



m 

S T U D E N 



UCLA students can attend events listed 
in this box for less than the price of a 
regular student ticket, and the seats are 
among the best in the house. Present 
your current student ID at the Central 
Ticket Office (CTO) 
and ask for SCA tickets. For 
additional information on upcoming . 
events or to receive a brochure, 
call (310) 825-2101. 
T Limit 2 tickets per ID g qy 

COMMITTEE p'''^"''^- '^""*^' "c -^ 

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-^ _ O Q) C 

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4/24 

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5/1 

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Margaret Jenkins Dance Company (w) 

Leon Bates ( s) 

Margaret Jenkins Dance Company (w) 

Diana Krall (w) 

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (w) 

Rambcrt Dance / London (w) ' 

Rambcrt Dance / London (w) 

GIoImU Divas (w) 

Batsheva Dance (w) 

Batsheva Dance (w) 

Batsheva Dance (w) 

Daniel Ezraiow - "Mandala" (f) 

Daniel Ezraiow • "Mandala'' (!) 

American Repertory Dance Company (s) 

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (w) 

Dubravka Tomsic (s) 

James Galway w/ Tokyo String Quartet (w) 

Altan (w) 

Los MuAequitos de Matanzas (w) 

Alison Brown Quartet (s) 

Paco de Lucia Sextet (wi) 

Arte Cof^le (s) 

Monsters of Grace (r) 

Monsters of Grace (r) 

Garrick Ohlsson (s) 

Monsters of Grace (r) 

Quartetto Gelato (w) 

Monsters of Grace (r) 

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (b) 

Monsters of Grace (r) 

Lucie Arnaz (s) 

Monsters of Grace (r) 

Alexander String Quartet • Beethoven (s) 

The Chieftahis (r) 

Chanticleer • "Mexican Baroque" (r) 

David Holt (s) 

Marcus Roberts (w) 

MarsaUs/Stravimky (r) 



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Thunday, FebriMry 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin News 



♦ 

Violations of Pentagon homosexual policies rampant 



MILITARY: Harassment of 
gays in service reaches 
record levels, report says 



ByEikltMMibcrg 

Hearst News 

WASHINGTON - The armed 
forces last year violated in record 
numbers a Pentagon policy designed 
to make it easier for homosexuals to 
serve in the military, according to the 
Service members Legal Defense 
Network (SLDN), a gay rights l^al 
organization here. 

It cited 563 violations, a 27 percent 
jump over the previous year's number 
and an increase for the fourth year in 
a row. 

The legal defense group's Hndings 
are contained in a report, "Conduct 
Unbecoming," due to be released 
Thursday. 

Previously, the group said, there 
were 443 violations in 19%, 363 in 
1995 and 340 in 1994. 

The recent violations included 
instances in which military comman- 
ders "asked, pursued and harassed 
service members in direct violation of 



the limits to gay investigations under 
current policy," the report said. 

It added that there "is a climate in 
many commands where 'anything 
goes' in the pursuit of suspected gay 
personnel. Commanders who want to 
do the right thing must swim up 
stream." 

The group based its annual report 
on data provided by service members . 
who went to the organization seeking 
legal aid. 

A Pentagon spokesman declined 
to comment on the report, saying he 
had not yet seen it. 

In 1993, after ji bruising battle 
among the White House, the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff and Congress, the mil- 
itary adopted a policy of "don't ask, 
don't tell, don't pursue" regarding 
gay men and lesbians. The policy said 
homosexual activity would remain 
banned in the military, but that gays 
and lesbians may serve as long as they 
keep quiet about their sexual orienta- 
tion. 

Under the policy, gay recruits and 
troops cannot be asked about their 
sexual orientation unless comman- 
ders have "credible information" that 
they arc actually engaged in homosex- 
ual conduct. 



The previous Pentagon policy 
allowed commanders to make such 
queries without any direct evidence. 

Last year the Pentagon told con>- 
manders that Credible information" 
must contain more than a simple 
accusation by one service member 
against another. 

Despite that effort, the legal rights 
grodp said it has documented an 
increase in violations in which com- 
manders were asking service mem- 
bers about their sexuality, pursuing 
them and harassing them. 

For example, SLDN said that in 
124 cases, commanders asked service 
members if they were homosexual 
without sufficient cause, up from 89 
reported violations in 1996. It said it 
had documented 235 violations in 
which commanders investigated sus- 
pected homosexual troops without 
credible evidence, up from 191 the 
previous year. And it reported 182 
anti-gay harassment incidents, includ- 
ing death threats and assaults, a 38 
Ijercent increase from the 132 inci- 
dents reported in 1996. 

However, SLDN found that "don't 

tell" violations, in which military 

counselors or health care providers 

turned in suspected homosexual ser- 



vice members, had dropped signiPi- 
cantly. There were 22 such violations 
in 1997, down from 31 in the previous 
year. 

The report said that of all the mili- 
tary services, the Navy committed the 
most violations - 193 - of the 
Pentagon's policy. 

The organization pointed to the 
case of Senior Chief Petty Officer 
Timothy McVeigh, a 17-ycar veteran 
based in Honolulu, as an examine of 
the Navy going out of its way t^->, 
invade the privacy of a suspected gay. 

In Janti|iry the Navy discharged 
McVeigh (no relation to the convicted 
Oklahoma City bomber) after investi- 
gators gained access to his e-mail user 
profile from American Online. In the 
profile, McVeigh said his marital sta- 
tus was "gay" and listed his hobbies as 
"driving, boy-watching, collecting pic- 
tures of other young studs." 

The Navy was overruled by U.S. 
District Judge Stanley Sporkin, who 
said that the "Navy went too far" and 
had "violated the very essence of 
'don't ask, don't pursue' by launching 
a search-and-destroy mission." 

In another example, SLDN cited 
the case of Kevin Smith, a Marine 
Corps lance corporal who was hospi- 



talized after being assaulted outside a 
gay bar in San Angelo, Texas, last 
September. 

Smith's sergeant was more intent 
on determining whether the victim 
was gay than in tracking down his 
attackers, SLDN said. The sergcaAt 
pressed Smith about his sexuality, and 
fearing an investigation. Smith left 
the military. 

The group also noted the case of an 
Air Force woman from Louisiana 
accused of being a lesbian by a former 
roommate, who later retracted the 
accusation and said it was false. But 
the woman was discharged anyway, 
"despite the lack of evidence," the 
report said. 

Absent from this year's study was a 
tally of how many Vpops were dis^ 
charged in 1997 because oi, homosex- 
uality. ^~^~~ ■ " 

Kevin Winston, a spokesman for 
SLDN. said the Pentagon had yet to 
forward the statistics to the organiza- 
tion, as it had done since the homo- 
sexual policy went into effect. 

In 1996, the Pentagon dismissed 
850 gay and lesbian service members, 
up from 722 in 1995, 597 in 1994 and 
682 in 1993, according to Pentagon 
statistics provided to SLDN. 



Two drugs can neariy replace estrogen in ost( 



f ill 



osis treatment 



WOMEN: Medications 
offer hope without side 
effects Hke breast cancer 



By Katharine Webster ^. : 

The Associated Press 

A new study adds to evidence that 
an bsteopt>rosis drug works nearly as 
well aS estrogen in strengthening the 
bones of post-menopausal women. 

A small dose of alendronate, sold 
under the brand name Fosamax, 
increased bone mineral density in the 



spines and hips of women ages 45 to 
59, the age group in which bone loss is 
most rapid, the study by European 
and Amcriam researchers found. 

Alendronate was the first non-hor- 
monal drug shown to combat osteo- 
porosis, a crippling disease that 
affects about 25 million Americans, 
mostly older women. It was approved 
by the federal Food and Drug 
Administration in late 1995. 

Osteoporosis makes the bones 
fragile, greatly increasing the risk of 
broken hips and the small spinal frac- 
tures that cause painful, humped 
backs in many elderly women. In 



elderly women, broken hips are one of 
the leading causes of hospitalization, 
and complications from such breaks 
are a leading cause of death. 

Previous studies have shown that 
alendronate slows bone loss and helps 
prevent broken bones in women who 
already sufTer from osteoporosis, 

This study, which was supported by 
the maker of Fosamax, is the first to 
show that alendronate also can pre- 
vent the disease, said Dr. Beth 
Dawson-Hughds, an osteoporosis 
researcher at Tufts University who 
was not involved in the study. 

"Estrogen in my view would be the 



first line (treatment), not only because 
it prevents bone loss, but it prevents 
the progression of heart disease ... and 
alleviates menopausal symptoms," 
Dawson-Hughes said. 

However, many women will not 
take estrogen because of its side 
effects and i modest increase in the 
risk of breast cancer, making alen- 
dronate a good alternative, she said. 

Another promising alternative is 
the recently approved drug ralox- 
ifene, sold by Eli Lilly & Co. as Evista. 
This drug, so-called designer estrogen, 
protects bones but does not increase 
the risk of breast cancer. Like alerv 



dronate, it does not prevent heart dis- 
ease, but researchers hope to develop 
a designer estrogen that will, Dawson- 
Hughes said. 

The study, published in Thursday's 
New England Journal of Medicine, 
was designed to find the lowest dose 
of alendronate that would maintain or 
increase bone density in the majority 
of post-menopausal women. 

It found that women taking 5 mil- / 
ligrams daily could benefit while suf- 
fering no more side efTects than those 
taking a dummy pill. The usuaf dose 

See OSnOHNNISIS, page 16 



The A«"«'®Vtaur 
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10 



Thunday, Fcbniary 19, 1996 



IMy Bnitn N«w» 



Oiurches institute measures designed to attract men 



REUGION: Attempt to get 
more males to worship 
calls for all new tactics 



By Dtego Mbadeneira 

The Boston Globe 

For decades women have outnum- 
bered men when it comes to filling 
v.f^ ' ._ church pews. For many congregations, 
the Norman Rockwell painting of a 
mother and child heading to church 
•' while dad ducks behind a newspaper is 

as accurate as it is funny. 

But today, finding out what men 
want out of church and olTering it has 
become a top priority for many 
Protestant churches around the coun- 
try. 
^"^ Increasingly, churches have con- 
cluded that one of their best chances to 
boost membership is to reach out to 
men whose wives and children already 
attend. In many cities some churches 
are seeking out more men to serve as 
mentors in anti-drug and anti-violence 
programs in troubled communities. 

Churches are reaching out with 
everything from basketball leagues, to 
male-only Bible classes and prayer 
groups, to fathering classes. 



"A lot of churches realize they 
haven't done a great job paying atten- 
tion to men and that they have to do 
something about it," said Edward 
Colzack, a Dallas consultant who helps 
churches increase their membership. 
"Men's ministries has become one of 
the buzzwords in church circles." 

The growth in men's ministries is 
primarily among evangelical and, to a 
lesser degree, mainline Protestant 
churches, although some Catholic 
parishes and Jewish congregations also 
have begun efforts to attract men. 

West Congregational Church in 
Haverhill, Mass., for instance, hired an 
assistant pastor three years ago whose 
main responsibility was to bring more 
men into the church. Today, just iibout 
evei^ man in the 600-mcmber church is 
involved in some type of ministry or 
church-affiliated group. ^^ 

Greater Lx)ve Tabernacle Church in 
Boston's Mission Hill neighborhood 
has drawn scores of new male mem- 
bers in recent years through programs 
including prison ministries, street evan- 
gelizing and men's fellowships. 

"All these groups have brought the 
brothers closer and we really support 
each other like a family," said "Mohty 
Bynoe, who joined the church two 
years ago. "When you're in these min- 



istries, you get to know people on a 
much more personal level, and it gives 
you a stronger relationship to the 
church." 

At Resurrection Lutheran Church 
in Boston's Roxbury neighborhood, 
several men's groups, including a 
monthly breakfast discussion, have 
been launched in the past four years. 

*'Wc realized that we weren't doing 
enough to appeal to men and to take 
advantage of the resources they could 
bring." said the Rev. John Heinemeier. 
Among other things, these new groups 
mentor boys in the neighborhood and 
help provide fathering classes to men 
who are involved with Roxbury 
District Court and are on probation. 

Before the outreach, more than 80 
percent of the church's new members 
were women. Now, almost half the new 
members are men, Heinemeier says. 
About 125 people regulariy attend 
Sunday services. 

Pastors and scholars say churches 
traditionally have counted on the sup- 
port of women, both in membership 
and in congregational life. Several 
recent national studies show that from 
60 percent to 67 percent of members in 
Christian churches arc women, accord- 
i|\g to Carl S. Dudley, codirector of the 
center for social and religious research 



at Hartford Seminary in Connecticut. 

"Women have been the staple of the 
typical congregation." said Jay 
Demerath, a sociologist of religion at 
the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst. 

'The reasons for the differences in 
church membership and participation 
between men and women, religion 
scholars say. have to do with sociok)gy 
and psychology. 

Historically, as men entered the 
work force and women stayed home, 
church became the place where women 
could find a community of like-minded 
people. The church became for women 
^Nbtil the corner saloon or union hall 
v^ for men: a place to socialize, com- 
miserate and talk about life issues. 

And as women took on the main 
parenting role in families, they tended 
to assume responsibility for taking 
their children to church and to Sunday 
school. 

Men and women also have differed 
in their motivations to get involved in 
church, the scholars say. Women are 
more likely to respond to traditional 
church activities such as praying, 
singing and preaching. Men tend to be 
more interested in a program that 
makes what they hear from the pulpit 
relevant to their lives. 



"Our experience has shown that a 
good way to keep men interested is giv- 
ing them something that goes beyond 
just preaching or singing," said the 
Rev. William E. Dickerson, pastor of 
Greater Love Tabernacle Oiurch in 
Mission Hill. 

The emphasis on attracting men is, 
in part, a by-product of the religious 
renaissance in America. Many families 
again are looking to churches to instill 
strong morals in their children . But pas- 
tors say that in many churches, much of 
this responsibility still is shouldered by 
women. WonMh, for example, are 
much more likely to volunteer as 
Sunday school teachers. 

Another important factor influenc- 
ing churches' approach toward men 
has been the success of the Promise 
Keepers, a national men's ministry that 
has attracted hundreds of thousands to 
stadiums for prayer and fellowship. 
The growth of the Promise Keepers 
has made many pastors feel that men 
ma^ have been neglected. 

Many urban churches have used 
comrtiunity-service programs with 
tutors or mentors as a way to enroll 
men. Greater Love Tabernacle, for 
example, has a ministry called ^'Who 

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Thursday, February 19, 1998 11 



Divisions in African American community threaten museum dreams 

CULTURE: Despite need 
for historical monument, 
actions continue to stall • 



ByNataMeHopUnson 

Cox News Service 

WASHINGTON - Steve 
Newsome always knows February is 
near by the rash of inquiries deluging 
-^-his office. 

• As director of the Anacostia 
Museum and the Center Tor African 
■ American History and Cuhure - the 
lone sector of the Smithsonian 
Institution devoted to the African 
American experience - Newsome's 
services are in high demand during 
Black History Month. 

And like clockwork, each year 
— someone reopens a 14-year*old ques- 
tion: Whatever Irappened . to the 
National African American Museum 
Project? 

Conceived in 1984 by a Washington 
African American businessman, the 
museum was to be the mother of all 
African American museums, a nation- 
al establishment devoted to celebrating 
African American heritage amid 
Washington's glittery monuments and 
cvmuseums on the Mall. 



But Congress, faced with skillful 
opposition from Sen. Jesse Helms, R- 
N.C., refused to charter the museum. 

Instead, in 1995, the Smithsonian 
Institution attached what was left of 
the project to Newsome's 3 1 -year-old 
Anacostia Museum, a small, commu- 
nitynlriven museum located in pre- 
dominantly African American south- 
eastern Washington. '•- 

The museum project became the 
Center for African American History 
and Culture, sharing space with the 
two-room Anacostia Museum and its 
$2.7 million budget. The center also 
sends small exhibits to one of the major 
Smithsonian museums on a revolving 
basis. 

To some African American leaders 
and academics, the derailment of the 
dream of a national African American 
museum is an affront to African 
Ahterican culture. — . - • 

"There is a glaring omission here in 
the capital of the United^States," said 
Thomas Battle, director of Howard 
University's Moorland Springarn 
Center, which has one of the largest 
collections of research material on 
African American life in America. 

The current effort is not satisfacto- 
ry or sufficient," he said. "The 
Anacostia Museum is a stepchild of 
the Smithsonian." 



Battle, who participated in a board 
assembled in 1990 by the Smithsonian 
to decide what form the proposed 
museum should take, says the blarne 
for. its failure to be born lay with the 
institution's mostly white directors 
who weren't seriously committed to 
having an African American presence 
onthftMall. 



Despite the continuing 

divide, many ... say the 

museum idea should 

be pursued 

aggressively. 



African American leader^ weren't 
surprised by the Smithsonian's appar- 
ent lack of enthusiasm. The institution, 
which assembled the nation's largest 
consortium of museums in the first 
place, failed to include the folks who 
gave America centuries of free labor. 

But the history of the effort to cre- 
ate the museum suggests that neither 
the Smithsonian nor Congress 
deserves all the blame for the project's 
failure. 

A more familiar dynamic appears 



to have doomed the project at its 
inception: the notion that descendants 
of Africa still can't decide whether they 
are American or African American. 

This basic contradiction in African 
American life created the need for a 
separate museum, and - as this month 
reminds us - a separate history month. 

When Washington businessman 
Tom Mack proposed the idea of build- 
ing a museum devoted to the history 
and culture of African Americans 14 
years ago, two factions of African 
American supporters battled over who 
should tell the story. 

Mack and his allies criticized the 
Smithsonian as a racist institution 
incapable of doing justice to African 
American culture. They advocated 
raising the money themselves and lim- 
iting the Smithsonian's authority over 
thepr^ed. 

^— mt the Smithsonian lined up a 
prominent group of African American 
thinkers who argued that the institu- 
tion should build the museum - with 
federal money - because it had an 
obligation to represent all facgts of 
American life. ^ 

Two competing organizations were 
formed. Black Congress members 
were recruited by each side. 
Eventually, two different bills to estab- 
lish the museum hit Capitol Hill in the 



eariy 1990s. 

So before Helms scuttled the effort 
for a national museum in 1994, the 
divisions in the African American 
community had already seriously 
weakened the dream. 

This thread of contradiction - 
African Americans.first or Americans 
first - is woven into much of the histo- 
ry that African Americans learn. 

In the early 1900s, W.E.B. Dubois 
argued for greater African American 
integration into the American culture, 
while Booker T Washington preached 
entrepreneurship and self-reliance for 
the African American community. By 
mid-century, civil rights leader Martin 
Luther King Jr. was dueling with 
African American power advocate 
Malcolm X. Today, the Rev. Jesse 
Jackson's Rainbow Coalition 
approach rivals Minister Louis 
Farrakhan's Nation of Islam. ^.^^ 

Despite the continuing divide, 
many African American thinkers and 
political leaders say the museum idea 
should be pur&ued aggressively. 

]^ Because so much of the black 

experience has been left out, the need 
is still there," said Leroy Davis, a histo- 
ry professor at Emory University. "We 
can't pretend that the black experience 

Sec MUSEUM, page 13 




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Daily Bruin News 



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INDICTMENT 

From page 5 

there. The nuns testified the temple 
destroyed or altered records to 
avoid embarrassment. 

Gore has said he did not know it 
was a fund-raising event, but a draft 
report by the Senate panel con- 
cludes it should have been obvious 
to him. 

"The matters for which Ms. Hsia 
has been indicted do not involve 
Vice President Gore," said Gore 
spokesnran Christopher Lehane. 
"This is now a question for the 
courts, and we are confident fairness 
will be done." 

But mindful of the potential polit- 
ical fallout, a. Gore aide said any 
efforts by partisan opponents in the 
future to taint the vice president • 
would be "cynical efforts to exploit 
the issue for a cheap political gain." 

Clinton's 1996 opponent, Bob 
Dole, and Presidents Bush and 
Reagan all had political supporters 
and personal friends convicted of 
crimes, but the public did not blame 
those politicians, said a Gore aideT 
who spoke on condition of anonymi- 
ty- 

The six-count indictment alleges 
that Hsia, a 47-year-old immigration 
consultant.'Conspired to defraud the 
United States and caused false state- 



ments about the contributions' 
source to be filed by campaign com- 
mittees with the Federal Election 
Commission. 

Hsia's attorney. Nancy Luque, 
has denied that her client, a Taiwan- 
born U.S. citizen and California res- 
ident, violated the law and has said, 
she will fight any charges. 

Hsia was expected to surrender 



The grand jury charged 

that ... monks and nuns, 

Hsia's clients and Hsia 

herself posed as the 

donors of contributions. 



here Thursday for arraignment. 

Specifically, the grand jury 
charged that corporate money 
belonging to the temple was used to 
make disguised and illegal campaign 
contributions to federal, state and 
local candidates. 

The grand jury charged that tem- 
ple monks and nuns, temple volun- 
teers, Hsia's chents and Hsia herself 
posed as the donors of contributions 
but were reimbursed with money 
from the temple. 

The straw contributions were 
given to the Democratic National 









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THE 




Career Center 


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Whether you're a freshman or a 



Tuesday, February 17 



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Appreciation 

A special 'thank you" to these campus 
departments and organizations for their 
significant contributions to Career Month '98: 

College of Letters and Science 
Office of Residential Life 
Office for Students with Disabilities 
UCLA Alumni Association 



CAREER PREPARATION WORKSHOPS 
. 10 am - 3 pm Ackerman 2408. 

2410, 2412 and 3508 

Choosing a Major, Internships, Graduate . 
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CAREER OPTIONS 

1 2 - 1 pm Career Center 



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19 



Wednesday. February 18 



CAREER PREPARATION WORKSHOPS 
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Committee; Clinton-Gore '96; the 
1994 re-€lection campaign of Sen. 
Kennedy, D-Mass.; the 1996 re-elec- 
tion campaign of Rep. Patrick 
Kennedy, D-R.l.; Democrat March 
Fong Eu's 1994 campaign for re- 
election as California secretary of 
state; and Republican Don Knabe's 
1996 campaign for Los Angeles 
County supervisor. 

The conspiracy count specifically 
mentions the temple fund-raiser 
attended by Gore and $55,000 in 
contributions it says Hsia solicited a 
day later from 1 1 individuals asso<5i- 
ated with the temple. It adds that 
contributions totaling $10,000 that 
Hsia arranged before the event also 
were reimbursed. 

The indictment mentions $8,000 
in contributions to Sen. Kennedy; 
$5,000 in contributions to his son, 
Rep. Patrick Kennedy; $90,000 in 
misreported contributions to the 
Democratic National Committee; 
$14,000 in misreported contribu^ 
tions to Clinton-Gore '96; $1,500 in 
contributions to Knabe; and $500 to 
March Fong Eu. 

On Jan. 29, the campaign finance 
task force indicted Charlie Trie, a 
former Little Rock, Ark., restaura- 
teur and longtime Clinton friend, 
and his associate, Antonio Pan, on 
fund-raising charges. Trie returned 
from abroad earlier this month and 
pleaded innocent. 



Tuesday 
Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

on 

Tuesday 
Tuesday 



imI^ ^RSfl RVwS 



Thun(lay,F(bnHry19,l998 13 



MUSEUM 



From page 11 

hasn't been portrayed in a stereo- 
typical way or not at all." 

Davis pointed out that ot^er 
ethnic groups, such as Native 
Americans and victims of the 
Holocaust, have achieved congres- 
sional approval for a museum on 
or near the mall in Washington. 

The National Museum of the 
American Indian was chartered by 
Congress and is slated to open, 
under the Smithsonian's auspices, 
in 2002. 

Although not affiliated with the 
Smithsonian, the U.S. Holocaust 
Memorial Museum won uruini- 
mous approval from Congress 
aAer no debate. Paid for by private 
contributors, the building opened 
on federal property in 1993. 

Today, Rep. John Lewis, D- 
TJa., continues to introduce legisla- 
tion to .charter an African 
American history museum that 
wouldn't require any federal 
money. But each year Congress 
refuses to take up his bill. . 

With no help from Congress in 
sight, it seems that if a national 
African American museum is to be 
built in Washington, African 
Americans will haveHo do it them- 
selves. 



The road to the 

enlightenment 

of your 

pockets 

begins with 

Pacific Ties. 



Las Vegas - 

our next issue. 

Out Monday, 

February 23. 



UNITED NATIONS 

From page 5 

has given its conditional support 
for the trip. White House press sec- 
retary Mike McCurry said earlier 
today: "We're just not going to 
willingly accept whatever results 
from this mission. We want to be 
able to look at it and make sure that 
it fulfills what we think are the prin- 
ciples that apply." 

Annan will leave Thursday and 
arrive in Baghdad on Friday. 
Annan said he would meet directly 
vyith Saddam over the weekend. 

In announcing his decision, 
Annan said he didn't ask for a man- 
date from the Security Council's 
five permanent members - the 
United States, Britain, France, 
Russia and China - but did seek 
clear direction about what he could 
discuss with the Iraqis. 

Russian President Boris Yeltsin 
said today the visit was "extremely 
important," the ITAR-Tass news 
agency reported. 

.^^^oreign Ministry spokesman 
Valery Nesterushkin said Annan's 
visit would not be the last chance 
for a peaceful settlement, accord- 
ing to the Interfax nev^ agency. 

Baghdad has blocked inspectors 
from gaining access to eight so- 
called presidential sites, arguing 



they represent symbols of Iraqi 
sovereignty. 

The inspectors must certify that 
Iraq has destroyed its long-range 
missiles and weapons of mass 
destruction before the council will 
lift crippling economic sanctions 
imposed in 1990, when Saddam's 
troops invaded 'Kuwait, touching 
offthe 1991 Gulf War. 

Iraq claims it has destroyed all 
banned weapons and that the spe- 
cial commission has deceived the 
council to keep the sanctions in 
place. 

Several formulas have been pro- 
posed. One would have inspectors 
from the special commission, 
known as UNSCOM, be accompa- 
nied by diplomats on visits to presi- 
dential sites. 

Others would have Annan 
appoint a new group of inspectors, 
some of which could be from 
UNSCOM. Iraq has also insisted 
on a 60-day time-limit for inspec- 
tions, something the United States 
and Britain have rejected. 

in Baghdad, Saddam's 
Revolution Command Council and 
the ruling Ba'ath Party issued a 
statement Tuesday pledging to 
"exert all serious and legitimate 
effort" to find a peaceful solution. 

The statement did not offer any 
concessions that might avert an 
attack. 



DENG 



From page 5 I 

labor force, Jiang and his colleagues 
are taking risks Deng contemplated 
but never dared. ' 

Unemployment, already as high 
as 15 million in the cities, could dou- 
ble in the next two years, a once 
unthinkable event in a society that 
promised lifetime jobs. 

At the same time, 130 million 
peasants, freed from land-bound 
toil by Deng's, end to collective 
farming, are looking for work, 
many of them in the cities. 

In Deng's day, "All levels of soci- 
ety benefited from the reforms. 
Society held really peaceful and sta- 
ble. 

"After Deng, that phenomenon 
of all levels benefiting in lock step 
has ended," said Wang, the author. 

"The reforms have created many 
social differences. After Deng, solv- 
ing social problems has become a 
headache," he added. 

The migrants who gather at an 
unofficial labor market on the 
Yongding Gate overpass in Beijing 
are near the bottom of the new 
social ladder. Peasants all, they 
come from farms too small - often 
no more than three-quarters of an 
acre - to support their families. 

About the best that Cui said he 



can hope for is to earn about $12 a 
month by finding a day or two of 
carpentry work a week. 

"Even college graduates can't get 
jobs these days," said .Cui, who 
came to Beijing from a small farm 
on the dusty northern Shandong 
plain, 150 miles to the southeast. 

Chinese leaders have responded 
with programs to improve social 
welfare, campaigns to promote 
communist thrift and a police crack- 
down on migrants without work. 

Cui and other migrants believe 
the situation will worsen before 
improving. But they seem resigned 
to the hardships as another phase in 
China's 20-year reform effort. 

A recognition of the necessity of 
reform, even by those who feel left 
behind, may be the best guarantee 
of future success. Deng thought so. 

His daughter, Deng Lin, said in 
an essav published Wednesday in 
Beijing newspapers that her father 
remained unshaken when some 
called for his ouster during the 
"crazy winds and evil waves" of 
1989 - a reference to the 
Tiananmen Square democracy 
protests and the crackdown Deng 
ordered. 

"Father said they may be shout- 
ing the slogan 'down with Deng 
Xiaoping' but they are not shouting 
'down with reform and openness,"' 
Deng Lin wrote. 





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Daily Bruin News 



ANNIVERSARY 

FfDm page 4 

were selling the store's inventory. 

"We were dismantling our lives and 
we didn't know what life we were fac- 
ing," said Tokuda, born in Seattle as the 
oldest of four children. 

It was May 1942, several months 
after the relocation order, and it was 
her neighborhood's turn to be evacuat- 
ed. Everyone left quietly. 

"There's no way to describe it," 
Tokuda said. "A kind of numbness set- 
tled over us. There were no words on 
the bus to Puyallup. It was so 
depressed. 

"All I saw were tears coming down 
my mother's cheek. I guess it was sad- 
ness, fear and exhaustion all mixed 
together." 

The family was housed in a small 



empty barrack rpom. Being young and 
- she says - "buoyant," she eventually 
adjusted to camp life in Puyallup and 
Minidoka. Idaho. 

But she still finds it painful to 
remember what interned adults went 
through. 

"1 think about my dad," Tokuda 
said. "He worked so hard to start his 
store (named Togo Clothing after a 
Japanese war hero). And then to lose it 
all and have to go to work as a janitor 
after the war." 

At the time, she did not feel a deep 
resentment agaijist a society in which 
Japanese Americans "were already seg- 
regated and treated as second<lass citi- 
zens." But now,she feels it is important 
to remember the breach of civil rights. 

"It means a lot to us (Japanese 
Americans) now," Tokuda said. 'The 
constitution is what you make it." 

•Every once in a while, Irwin 



Yoshimura opens the yearbook his 
family made during their time at the 
Minidoka internment camp. He turns 
the tattered pages to the picture of 
Block 40 and looks at his parents, 
grandparents, aunts, uncles, himself 
and his younger brother posing in front 
of the barrack where they lived. 

"I think how it was and how every- 
one made the best of it." said 
Yoshimura, 58, who was 3 when his 
family was evacuated from Beacon Hill 
to Puyallup. 

But he said there is also a sadness 
when he looks at his young working- 
class parents and his grandparents. 

Like many former internees too 
young to remember the pain of being 
uprooted, Yoshimura does recall how 
older generations struggled after the 
war to get their lost lives back on track; 
how they had to sell their belongings at 
rock-bottom prices and had nothing 



when they came back. 

"They worked awfully hard," said 
Yoshimura, now human resources spe- 
cialist at the corporate office of 
Uwajimaya. "I don't think they ever 
had a chance to enjoy life." 

Yoshimura can't recall his family's 
evacuation to Puyallup. But he remem- 
bers how life for kids in Minidoka was 
marked by baseball. Boy Scouts and 
dances. 

"I remembtfr catching grasshop- 
pers," he said. "Once, I sat on a cactus. 
It was very painful." 

His parents didn't encourage their 
children to dwell on the past. Despite 
their hardships, they rarely talked 
about life in the camps. Yoshimura's 
mother, who died from a stroke at a 
young age after the war, would only say 
that she was often the target of racial 
slurs when she took the boys for a walk 
in a stroller before their evacuation. 



* "Yes, internment was an injustice," 
he said. "But it may have been the 
safest thing for us (at the time)." 

•Ruth Kataoka was 17 when 
Roosevelt's executive order was 
announced. She lived with her parents 
and three sisters on a farm near 
Sumner, where the family grew rasp- 
berries, rhubarb, peas, beans and other 
vegetables. 

She too felt some relief because anti- 
Japanese sentiment whipped up by the 
media had prompted locals to drive by 
and throw a bottle at her family's home. 

"There was a lot of belligerence," 
said Kataoka, now 73. "After we left, 
people broke in and took things. Then, 
the house was set on fire. I didn't think 
I wanted to live around there." 

Leaders of the Japanese American 
community had been arrested after the 

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Tbunday,Febniary19,1998 15 



ANNIVERSARY 

From page 14 

attack on Pearl Harbor, so when the 
evacuation order came for her area 
"the rest of us went like sheep." 

"Our parents were from Meiji-cra 
(1868-1912) Japan - very obedient to 
authority," she said. "We (children) 
weren't outspoken as young people are 
today. We were very conforming, made 
sure^^ewere not too conspicuous." 

The nqnily took what they could 
carry. Kataoka's father gave his car to a 
friend who drove them to Puyallup. At 
the fairgrounds, she worked in the mess 
hall office and met her future husband. 

They were transferred to Minidoka 
in August. Japanese Americans had 
options to leave the camps. They could 
find a job or a college away from the 
coast or volunteer for military service 



in one of several segregated units sent 
overseas. 

Being young and "adventurous," 
Kataoka found a college professor in 
Salt Lake City who sponsored her to 
study nursing there. Her husband 
signed up as a soldier and was trained 
in military intelligence at Fort Snelling 
near Minneapolis. 

"Volunteering (for armed services) 
was quite controversial in the camps," 
Kataoka said. "Many parents were 
pro-Japanese, but most encouraged 
their sons to be loyal to the country they 
were born in." 

The couple married in St. Paul in 
1944 before he was sent to the 
Philippines. He died a nionth ago at 
age 81. 

"A lot of young people went inland 
or to the East Coast, where there wasn't 
as much prejudice," Kataoka said. "I 
think what it (relocation and intern- 



ment) did is spread everybody out 
across the country." 

•At the time of Pearl Harbor, 
Katashi Oita lived in California like 
tens of thousands of other Japanese 
Americans. He was a chemistry stu- 
dent at the University of California, 
Berkeley. 

His parents, brother and two 
younger sisters lived in Watsonville 
near the coast. After the Japanese 
attack, it was feared that Japanese 
Americans would spy for the enemy.'so 
the family was ordered to move inland. 
They took up residence with his older 
sister, who lived in a part of Watsonville 
5 miles from the Pacific. 

When the evacuation order came, 
the family went to the rodeo grounds in 
Salinas before they were transferred to 
a camp in Poston, Ariz. 

"1 didn't think as much about my 
civil rights as about the safety of the 



United States," said Oita, who was 
hired as a chemist by Weyerhaeuser in 
the 1960s. "At the time, we trusted the 
government and believed they must 
have had a good reason (to relocate 
Japanese Americans)." 

A year after their relocation, howev- 
er, he and many other Japanese 
Americans began to realize that spying 
allegations against their community 
were largely fabricated and he became 
aftgfy about their internmerrt. 

The American Friends Service 
Committee, a Quaker organization, 
provided food, clothing, medicine, job 
placements, scholarships and homes to 
many Japanese Americans during the 
war. With their help, he found work as 
a houseboy in Chicago. The Quakers 
later helped him go back to college. 
Eventually, he received a doctorate in 
chemistry. 

His success in education left Oita, 



now retired, with mixed feelings about 
his treatment during World War II. 

"The internment was based on para- 
noia and our parents lost wjiat they 
worked for," he said. "But it took us 
(younger Japanese Americans) out of 
tne ghetto. It opened up a new world 
for us." 

'On the day she was evacuated, 
Masako Tomita, now 69, recalls baby- 
sitting her younger brothers while her 
parents gathered tbeir belongings from- 
the family's rentW home in the Central 
Area. It was three months after 
Roosevelt's executive order. 

"It was a beautiful day, but it wasn't 
happy by any means," said Tomita, 
who was a 14-year-old Garfield High 
School student at the time. "My moth- 
er cried when we left the house. She was 
scared." 

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ANNIVERSARY 



From page 15 

Otherwise, her parents "were quiet 
and stoic - didn't say anything," she 
said. "I think I would have been out- 
raged" 

But Puyaliup and Minidoka weren't 
bad for young people, said Tomita, 
now nntritinn program map^gf r at the 
Nisei (second-generation Japanese 
Americans) Veterans Club just east of 
the International District. 

She went to Girl Scout camps, 
learned to dance and helped harvest 
potatoes. "We didn't dwell on the bad 
things." 

It wasn't until the 1960s, when 
Congress passed civil rights acts ban- 
ning many forms of discrimination 
against minorities, that Tomita "was 
educated about the injustice" of her 
internment. 



OSTEOPOROSIS 

From page 8 

for people already suffering from 
osteoporosis is 10 milligrams, but that 
can lead to side effects including 
abdominal pain, acid indigestion and 
nausea. 

Dawson-Hughes said she is reserv- 
ing judgment on whether side efTects 
are as insignificant as the study sug- 
gests, since previous research also 
found few side efTects "and yet peo- 
ple'* clinical experience using the 
drug is that many people cannot toler- 
ate it." 

The study looked at two groups of 
women over two years of treatment. 

In the first group, 1,070 women 
were randomly assigned to take either 
5 milligrams or 2.5 milligrams of alen- 
dronate, or a dummy pill. Women tak- 
ing the higher dose gained bone in the 
spine, hips and total body; those tak- 



"Aftcr that, it was difficult for me to 
talk about camp," she said. "I would 
choke up." 

Although the money each former 
internee received in 1988 didn't begin 
to make up for the material and emo- 
tional losses Japanese Americans suf- 
fered durmg the war, Tomita felt it was 
a landmark victory for her community. 

"The only way to make Americans 
realize the injustice of what was done 
was to make them pay," she said. 

But despite the government's apolo- 
gy, "there is still an atmosphere of prej- 
udice in the United States" and too 
often ethnic groups become targets of 
discrimination, Tomita said. 

That is now the main reason Tomita 
said she remembers the day Roosevelt 
signed her evacuation order. 



ing the lower dose gained some bone 
in the spine and hips and stayed about 
level in total bone density. Women 
who took the dummy pill lost bone 
everywhere. 

In the second group, 390 women 
took an estrogen-progestin combina- 
tion, 5 milligrams or 2.5 milligrams of 
alendronate, or a dummy pill. Women 
taking the higher dose of alendronate 
had gains in bone density that were 
nearly as good as those taking estro- 
gen-progestin. The lower dose of alen- 
dronate was not as effective, but still 
was significantly better than the 
dummy pill. 

The study was led by Dr. David 
Hosking of City Hospital in 
Nottingham, England, and supported 
by Merck Research Laboratories oX 
Rahway, N.J., which makes Fbcamax. 



MEN 




From page 10 

are You" that works with middle- 
school students on life skills. 

"Obviously these arc broad general- 
izations, but research has shown that 
men have a more activist strain," said 
Garth Baker-Retcher, a professor at 
Qaremont School of Theology in 
Oaremont, Calif "Even if it's just fix- 
ing the church sign or painting the 
church, that's something that churches 
have done to get men interested. It 
builds camaraderie and gets men inside 
the church " 

At Tree of Life Gospel Church in 
Springfield, Mass., church leaders 
organized a basketball league two 
years ago to draw neighborhood men. 
As a result, about a dozen men decided 
to join the 250-member congregation. 

"It was hoops and then after the 
game we had a 45-minute prayer group 
and Bible talk," said the Rev. Dale 



Conners. "We didn't force anybody to 
stay, but these guys had already 
become pals through the game so they 
were more willing to hang around and 
talk about Jesus." 
*- Perhaps the most successful strategy 
iiM- attracting men as well as women, 
religious scholars say, has been the cre- 
ation of small groups within congrega- 
tions. That means moving beyond 
prayer groups and Bible studies to 
offer programs for divorced men, sin- 
gles and business executives, as at° 
Grace Chapel in Lexington, Mass., for 
example. 

"The more things you have on the 
menu, the better," said David 
Mid wood, pastor of West 
Congregational Church in Haverhill. 
"Everything isn't for everyone, but 
hopefully there is something for every- 
one." 



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Thursday,February19,1998 17 



LAVA 



From page 1 

of seismology in the department of 
earth and space science. "It affects the 
direction they're going and their ampli- 
tude." 

The stiffer, colder mantle conducts 
the waves at a higher velocity com- 

pttfTTtx ttj II IC pUUfS tJT IIIUSIIIvl , IIIUIICII 

rock near the core-mantle boundary, 
Vidale said. 

The characterization of this region 
offers new insight into the unconven- 
tional behavior of the liquid rock as it 
migrates throughout the earth's inner 
layers. 

"Convection of mantle is the dri- 
ving force behind earthquakes," said 



Whitcomb. 

As scientists learn more about the 
dynamic relationship between shifting 
temperatures and densities in the core- 
mantle boundary, the more they under- 
stand the behavior of earthquakes, 
Whitcomb said. 

In the meantime, scientists diversify 
their research efforts so they can attack 
different angles of seismology. 
— M i cha e l HedHn is cu rr en t ly study- 
ing how the heterogenities in the man- 
tle vary across the earth by comparing 
different sets of data to the global aver- 
age. ♦ 

This, he realizes, will be one more 
step to understanding earthquakes. 

"Science moves in little jumps, and 
this might get us a little closer," con- 
cluded Hedlin. 



FiNPING POCKETS IN THE MANTJE 



Lakes or podwts of molten magma k>uted 40 miles at>ove tiie outer core mantle Dounaary 
cause chartges in the directiofl of seismic wave travel. These discrepaiKies can be recorded 
at seismk detection centers, to be analyzed later and used to map out the pockets. 




Seismoktgy detection center k>cated in Norway. 



Sosmoiogical origin 
kKatedonanisiandin 
the Southwest Padfk 




jWiH>^)liiwy 



ERNEST LEM>Mty Bruin 



REAL BRUINS 



From page 3 

After the opening rush, the eight- 
year ASUCLA employee poured him- 
self a cup of coffee, the only one he 
would drink that day 

"The employees freak when I drink 
more," he joked. 

While going over time cards in his 
small office at the cofieehouse, clut- 
tered with backpacks, coffee mugs and 
Dilbert comic strips, Newlove talked 
about some of the problems that come 
with managing 120 student employees. 

"When we get into midterms and 
finals, this is v4iat happens to the num- 
ber of people who call in sick." 
Newlove explained, drawing a graph 
with the highest peaks of sick calls dur- 
ing the exam weeks. 

He said that presents u problem 
when there's not enough employees tp 
handle the long lines of customers. 

And Kerckhoff Coffeehouse does 
gets its fair share of lines, as the finan- 
cial statistics clearly show. 

After punching in the sales figures 
for the previous day in his computer, 
Newlove said the the coffeehouse 
brought in $5,367, 9.4 percent better 
than the figure for the same day the 
previous year. 

Newlove predicted the coffeehouse 
will serve 510,000 customers this year. 

Viewpoint doesn't see such a high 
number of customers or profits. In 
fact, Newlove said that most of the 
time, •* it just brtaks even."- 

At Viewpoint Cafe, a short while 
before, it opened its lines to students, 
Newlove tried to get everything into 
place. 

"How's it going?" he asked the 
en\ployees as he made his way over. 
"Can you make sure we have all the 
biscotti out and more chocolate to the 
front Also, wear your name tag." 

While there, Newlove checked up 
on the adjacent mini-bakery where 
everyday at 6 a.m., Antonio, the baker, 
bakes some of the fresh pastries. 

Any focxl that doesn't get sold, 
Newlove said, is donated to the 
Hunger Project, a UCLA community 



service organization. 

After checking up on Viewpoint 
Cafe, Newlove tcx)k the stairs back up 
- a journey he would make more than 
five times by the afterncxjn. 

"Later in the day, the elevators are 
useless," he said, "the dcx)rs open up 
and it's already packed. " 

Back in the office in kerckhoff, 
Newlove used the downtime to do 
some office work. 

"The one thing about this restaurant 
is I don't have an office staff." he said, 
"I have to do it all." 

Newlove previously worked with 
Marriot Hotel as a hotel restaurant 
manager, a business in which his wife is 
also involved. It was when he got mar- 
ried that he landed at UCLA. 

After his honeymoon, Newlove was 
hospitalized with pneumonia for five 
days. "Marriot got pissed," he 
explained, 'so 1 sent an application to 
ASUCLA." y. 

Of the two locales, Newlove prefers 
the Bruin campus. 

However, keeping the balance 
between work and family life is one 
strain Newlove must endure. 

"I have a two-and-a-half-year-old 
daughter who goes to bed at 7:30 every 
night," Newlove said, "and there's a lit- 
tle boy on his way That's the hardest 
part. Like last night, 1 only got to see 
my daughter for 10 minutes. " 

On the other hand, the opportunity 
to build friendships with students is the 
sweetener in his espresso - it makes the 
job easier to handle. 

Newlove pulled out a letter he had 
recently received from a former 
employee, thanking him for the help he 
had given her on writing a resume. 

"That's what makes my job really 
cool, that totally made my day." he 
said, beaming. 

The manager no doubt takes advan- 
tage of the chance to make friends. 
Walking up and down Kerckhoff Hall 
proves that. 

S«c REAL MINNS, page 18 



Congralulalions 

to ttielnBCipients of the^ 



auinlife 



iorspotligh 

AMfard 



Bruinlife Yearbook 

would like to 

congratulate the 15 

winners of the Senior 

Spotlight Award. 

■We would also like to 

thank all who expressed 

interest and took the 

time to apply. 

Good luck and 

continued success in 

your future endeavors. 



^tv'n 



bruinlife 

YEARBOOK 



Gloria Maria Amador 
Jeffrey Canceko 
Jennifer Hertz 
Ben Hofileiia 
Catherine Krum 
Russell L. Moore 
Hannah W. Nahm 
Matthew Pirifazair 



Patricia A. Prevatil 
Roslyn Soto 
Tammy Stafford — 
Catherine R. Trinidad 
Vincent A. Villanueva 
Chris'sy Whalen 
Fanny Yu 



=it 



>\y'>.\ 



bruinKfe 

YEARBOOK 

^all 
825.2640^ 
Today! 



Get your Organization into the Bruinlife Yearbook! 

Call 825.2640 or stop'by 118 Kerckhoff Hall for 

more information. HURRY! The deadline is 

February 23 and space is limited. 



You can also place personal ads in the Bniinllfe 

Yearbook by picking up an application at 1 18 Kerckhoff 

Hall. TbII your frtends, tell your parents, tell everyone 

you know! Congratulate your fellow graduates in the 

Bruinlife Yearl>ook and give one as a gift! 



I A». 



f 



18 Thunday, 



(,Frtfuafyl9, 



1996 



Daily Bruin News 



A BEAUTIFUL AND 

SEXY SMILE IN 1 -2 

VISITS! 

Without Injections 

Use one of the Idbwlng Introi^ctory offers to se« us 
mi tm stoto-of-tln-art office. Dace you hove $eon 
per iie(i»ilkiii to excdbnco m fomily dootbtry mdi 
f^xpmmm fbe kliKl md jiersosd oftaitloa b our J 
l^frlemJfy ofttiosfji0re, you vM sot wont to go 1 
c&iywtiwe ^, 



CALL (310)394-0247 

Email: sheily@DDS4U.com 

1502 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 303, 
Santa Monica 





iy?5: 






-«t^*.. 





Hoiir 



Emergency Same Day Care for Toothaches 

" t ■ ■ " I " III I I I 'f i D lii' I' ll II ( 



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Expirts 2-27-96 I 



THE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY 
IN THE NEXT MILLENNIUM 

Why did presiigioMs Christian universities such as Harvard and Yale surrender to seatlaristn? 

How do Christian universities maintain academic integrity \vhile still remaining faithful to Christ? 

In celebration ofBiola University's 90th Anniversary, an academic conference featuring renown lecturers and 
authors will come together to discuss the role of the Christian university in <*e new cerOuty! 

> 

^9/#f gjuejtl IteJtMju^tJNi 



Dallas Willard, Ph.D. - 

Professor of Philosophy, 

University of Southern California- 



J.I. Packer, Ph.D. - 

Professor of Theology, 

Regent College 



George Marsden, Ph.D. - 

Professor of History, 
University of^hJotre Dame 



Friday, February 27 - Saturday, February 28 



Friday li:O0 am - 8:45 pm 

Saturday 8:30 - 12:30 pm* 

No Registration or Conference Fees 

RSVP: 562.906.4548 




REAL BRUINS 

From page 1 7 

Each time he switched stations, he 
knew someone and their story. 

Around the 9 a.m. rush, Newlove 
hovered around the coffeehouse 
counter. 

Waiting in line was Scott Chandler, 
one of the two people with whom 
Newlove shares the privilege of choos- 
ing the cotTee of the month. ^~" 

The professor in the physiological 
sciences department bought a cup of 
joe and talked with Newlove. 

"He runs a tight ship," Chandler 
said. 

According to the manager, he and 
Chandler often go kayaking and work 
out together. 

"(Chandler) comes in twice a day," 
Newlove said, "for his LS (life sci- 
ences) 2 class, he gives the students a 
list of questions, and if they come in 
here and answer them right, they get a 
free mug. Last time, we gave away 300 
mugs." 

The smaller third of Ncwlove's 
duties include overseeing the cart out 
on the Kerckhoff Patio. 

Newlove walked out and made sure 
all the umbrellas were up and the sand- 
wiches were out. Throughout the day 
he made periodic checks to keep 
everything running smoothly. 

"At lunchtime the cart picks up," he 
said. "It's almost like a safety valve for 
people who just want brewed coffee." 

Aside from monitoring the three 
coffee outlets, the coffee machines, the 
temperatures of freezers and soup 
warmers, Newlove must keep an 
extremely weighty worry in his mind: 
theft. 

"There's been some theft of cash 
and giving away of food," he said. 
"Students don't realize they must go to 
the dean. It's a big deal. One non-stu- 
dent was arrested last year." 

A camera in the coffeehouse was 
put in as a deterrent, and Newlove said 
it has been somewhat effective. 

Counterfeit has recently been a 
problem, not just within Kerckhoff 
Coffeehouse but in other ASUCLA 
markets as well. 

"Someone has been passing coun- 
terfeit money," Newlove said while 
picking up a reserve bag in an 
Ackerman office, ''it counts as a short- 
age for us because we can't redeem it. 
They try to pass it off when it gets real- 
ly busy." 

Newlove said the coffeehouse alone 
has lost approximately $80, while the 
whole system has suffered a loss of 
about $500. 

Checking for counterfeit money can 
be cumbersome when a long line of 
irritated, caffeine-addicted, sleep- 
deprived students are waiting. And 
lines in Kerckhoff happen often. 

Every now and then, to alleviate the 
pressure caused by the students stack- 
ing up, Newlove acted as "barrista," a 
title given to the person who operates 
the espresso machine behind the 
counter. 

Later on, when things on campus 
began to wind down, the tables and 
chairs were full of students with open 
books, empty cups of coffee and half- 
eaten bagels. 

Behind the counter a "suicide 
bagel" was stuck between the tray and 
glass. When Newlove saw the troubled 
bread item, he asked a cashier to 
remove it. 

The plunging baked good reminded 
him of other bagel problems. 

"Some of them look so similar, like 
the sun-dried tomato and vegetable 
ones," he said. "We stopped selling 
chocolate chip bagels because they 
looked just like the blueberry ones." 

If a basketbay game is scheduled, 
Newlove will head on over to operate a 
small part of the total concessions at 
Pauley. 

While the seats in Pauley Saturday 
were empty, Newlove ran around get- 
ting uniform shirts for all the employ- 
ees, taking inventory of the food, mak- 
ing sure both regular and Kosher hot 

S«c RIAL BRUINS, page 19 



Daily Brain News 



U -^-..,^ 



Thursday, Febraary 19, 1998 19 



REAL BRUINS 

From page 18 

dogs were stocked at the stand, and 
keeping the stand, located by the exit, 
far enough away to meet fire code reg- 
ulations . 

"The purpose of management here, 
is mainly to give support, like cheer- 
leading," he said. "It's just nice to get 

: of the cofTcchouse."""' "-" — — ' 

Throughout the whole time, before 
and during the game, Newlove was 
climbing up and down the Pauley 
steps. If he ever entered a stairmaster 
competition, this guy would win. 

"My worst nightmare is falling 
down the stairs during a game on 
national television," he said, shaking 
his head. 

" He's probably one of the best boss- 
es I have had," said Gil Cardon, a fifth- 
year sociology student and senior stu- 
dent supervisor for Newlove. "He has 
the necessary technical skills and 
knowledge of a good manager." 

For Newlove, it's more than that. 

"It's working with the students that 
I like the most, it's what makes it dif- 
ferent from the rest," Newlove said, 
"This isn't just a dead-end job. If they 
want, students can get a lot out of this." 



PORNO 



From page 1 

According to Cross, the Vice 
Squad has also visited this residence. 

"A couple of years ago, we did 
shoot something in the backyard but 
it's totally secluded," Cross said. 
Throughout the years, the house has 
been the location where several mod- 
els for the videos were interviewed, in 
which "they tend to wear alluring 
clothing." 

These events could perhaps be 
responsible for the anonymous phone 
calls that Cross received at the house. 

"The things she said were highly 
sexist and racist," Cross said. He feels 
they were close to harassment. 

But one Westwood homeowner is 
looking past the tenant to the landlord 
of the Weybum building: Ira Smedra. 

Jackie Freedman, co-president of 
the Holmby-Westwood Property 
Owners Association, had heard that 
there was a pornography business in 
the Village. After walking by the loca- 
tion, she became suspicious and 
called the vice squad. 

Outside of lier disapproval of this 
sort of tenant in the village, she looks 
to the property's owner, Ira Smedra, 
as the one who is responsible. 

"It shows disregard to the village," 
Freedman said. "And he has left the 
property in deplorable conditions." 

But Smedra insists that he had no 
idea who was renting the small 200 
square-foot office space from him 
and only spoke to someone at the 
office for the very first time last week. 

His agent took care of the lease 
with Hot Body International, who 
claimed they were a telemarketing 
company, a business Smedra consid- 
ered legitimate. 

"It is to some degree telemarket- 
ing," Cross said. "It is direct market- 
ing; we ship things there." 

When Smedra spoke to a Hot 
Body employee last week, he was told 
that tapes were distributed from the 
office but there is no filming taking 
place there. 

"Everything is fine. It's not like 
business is being done there. It's not 
like it is a studio. There is nothing siQ*. 
ister going on there," Cross saicT *" 

But Smedra doesn't understand 
how the residents discovered what 
was going on in the Weyburn office. 
"If the homeowners know what the 
man is selling, then they must be buy- 
ing it." he said. 

. Despite just being a distribution 
center, Smedra evicted Hot Body 
International at the beginning of this 
month, giving the company 60 days to 
find another distribution center. "We 
don't allow adult uses," he simply 
stated. 



tA 



I \MJ\ \'A.\[(\\ cHM-: >N 




il.iir Cut. <l(-<-p (onditioncr 

N" hi<iliiic4ht: ^:^q 

ll<iir C lit, di-cp coiulitioncr 

6c peiiii; ^50 

ILiir Cut. deep conclitloncr 

il<iil Ci>lt>iiiu): $20 

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"Noilh ol Ohio 

III; ( ^ I ni '♦ 7 \ iMU,(, 



\'\\ V\| 



Opt'll .SlllHi<l>S 

VV.ilK in> WrU luiu-fl 



UCLA 




( .jII ^■ml^ l*arcnis 



Airline Rcwr\.itiuns 



Pictiirts 



Personal Ads are now being accepted 

for the Bruinlife YeaiiMM>k at 1 18 

Kerckhoff Hall. Place an acl for a 

fellow graduate. Tell your friends, tell 
your parents, tell everyone! Call 
825.2640 for further infonn^tion. . 
Hurry! Deadline is February 23! 



1 



— www.commencement.ucla.edu 

Dinner Rcscrvaiioiis 
P.irkinj; 

I 
I 




to the recipients-of the 

^iorspotliglTt 



Bruinlife Yearbook would like to 

congratulate the 1 5 winners of 

the Senior Spotlight Award. 

We would also like to thank ail 

who expressed interest and 

took the time to apply. 



Good luck and continued 
success in your future 
endeavors. 



^\y'>\ 



bruinlife 

YEARBOOK 



Gloria Maria Amador 
Jeffrey Canceko 
Jennifer Hertz 
Ben Hofilena 
Catherine Krum 
Russell L. Moore 
Hannah W. Nahm 
Patricia A. Prevatil 
Matthew Pirnazar 
Roslyn Soto 
^ammy Stafford — 
Catherine R. Trinidad 
Vincent A. Villanueva 
Chrissy Whalen _____ 
_f anay Yu 



18 ThursJay, Febfuary 19, 1998 



Dally Bruin News 



A BEAUTIFUL AND 

SEXY SMILE IN 1 -2 

VISITS! 

t Withoui Injections S 

Use me of the f oUowing ltitroib<tory offers to see us 

QQii 9m slate-of-flie-art office. Owe you liove seen 

tmt 4^^ke^mU exc^bnce m foiraly jtntlstry oad 

experlesce the kl^ (oidl i^^nd attentioa h our | 

frilly iikioijplN^ yotf v^l iot wont to go 



CALL (3 1 0)394-0247 

Email: shei!y@DDS4U.com 

1502 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 303, 
Santa Monica 



iH.mmaiYOjxs. 





r " ^ 



>c 




Hour 



Emergency Same Day Care for Toothaches 



ORAL-B ELECTRONIC 
TOOTH BRUSH! 

With complete exam, X-nys 

and deeniog. 
($129 value) Ejip2-27-98 



Insurance may cover 

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Expires 2-Z7-98 



"X^ €ut€ cam m itte n f {9» exeeUemct i» ^mmd^ duUia^* 



THE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY 
IN THE NEXT MILLENNIUM 

Why did prestigious Christian umversitie^ such as Harvard and Yaie surrender to secularism? 
How do Christian universities maintain academic integrity while still remaining faithful to Christ? 

In celebration ofBiola University's 90th Anniversary, an academic conference featuring renown lecturers and 

authors will come together to discuss the rote of the Christian university dt^e new centuryl 

f. 



Dauas Willard, Ph.D. - 

Professor of Philosophy, 

University ofSo$4them California 



J.I. Packer, Ph.D. - 

Professor of Theology, 

Regent College 



George Marsden, Ph.D. - 

Professor of History, 
University of Notre Dame 



Friday, February 27 - Saturday, February 28 



Friday li:00 am - 8:45 pm 

Saturday 8:30 - 11:30 pm- 

No Registration or Conference Fees 

RSVP: 562.906.4548 



BTOl A 



/ ''Sni} litnl, 

I .! \1:: J.I ( \ '>lh\ >) 



REAL BRUINS 

From page 1 7 

Each time he switched stations, he 
knew someone and their story. 

Around the 9 a.m. nwh, Newlove 
hovered around the cofieehouse 
counter. 

Waiting in hne was Scott Chandler, 
one of the two people with whom 
hicwlove shares the privilege of choos-^ 
ing the cofTee of the month. * . 

The professor in the physiological 
sciences department bought a cup of 
joe and talked with Newlove. 

"He runs a tight ship," Giandler 
said. 

According to the manager, he and 
Chandler often go kayaking and work 
out together. 

"(Chandler) comes in twice a day," 
Newlove said, "for his LS (life sci- 
ences) 2 class, he gives the students a 
list of questions, and if they come in 
here and answer them right, they get a 
free mug. Last time, we gave away 300 
mugs." 

The smaller third of Newlove's 
duties include overseeing the cart out 
on the Kerckhoff Patio. 

Newlove walked out and made sure 
all the umbrellas were up and the sand- 
wiches were out. Throughout the day 
he made periodic checks to keep 
everything running smoothly. 

"At lunchtime the cart picks up," he 
said. "It's almost like a safety valve for 
people who just want brewed coffee.? 

Aside from monitoring the three 
coffee outlets, the coffee machines, the 
temperatures of freezers and soup 
warmers, Newlove must keep an 
extremely weighty worry in his mind: 
theft. 

"There's been some theft of cash 
and giving a>yay of food," he said. 
"Students don't realize they must go to 
the dean. It's a big deal. One non-stu^ 
dent was arrested last year." 

A camera in the coffeehouse was 
put in as a deterrent, and Newlove said 
it has been somewhat effective. 

Counterfeit has recently been » 
problem, not just within Kerckhoff 
Coffeehouse but in other /\SUCLA 
:;• markets as well. 

"Sonf)eone has been passing coun- 
terfeit money," Newlove said while 
picking up a reserve bag in an 
Ackerman office. "It counts as a short- 
age for us because we can't redeem it. | 
They try to pass it off when it gets real- 
ly busy." 

Newlove said the coffeehouse alone 
has lost approximately S80, while the 
whole system has suffered a loss of 
about $500. 

Checking for counterfeit money can 
be cumbersome when a long line of 
irritated, caffeine-addicted, sleep- 
deprived students are waiting. And 
lines in Kerckhoff happen often. 

Every now and then, to alleviate the 
pressure caused by the students stack- 
ing up. Newlove acted as "barrista," a 
title given to the person who operates 
the espresso machine behind the 
counter. 

Later on, when things on campus 
began to wind down, the tables and 
chairs were full of students with open 
books, empty cups of coffee and half- 
eaten bagels. 

Behind the counter a "suicide 
bagel" was stuck between the tray and 
glass. When Newlove saw the troubled 
bread item, he asked a cashier to 
remove it. 

The plunging baked good reminded 
him of other bagel problems. 

"Some of them look so similar, like 
the sun-dried tomato and vegetable 
ones," he said. "We stopped selling 
chocolate chip bagels because they 
looked just like the blueberry ones." 

If a basketball game is scheduled, 
Newlove will head on over to operate a 
small part of the total concessions at 
Pauley. 

While the scats in Pauley Saturday 
were empty, Newlove ran around get- 
ting uniform shirts for all the employ- 
ees, taking inventory of the food, mak- 
ing sure both regular and Kosher hot 

SectEAL BRUINS, page 19 



Daily Brain News 



ThurMby,Fcbnury19,1998 19 



REAL BRUINS 

From page 1 8 «> 

dogs were stocked at the stand, and 
keeping the stand, located by the exit, 
far enough away to meet fire code reg- 
ulations . 

"The purpose of management here, 
is mainly to give support, like cheer- 
leading," he said. "It's just ni ce togpt 
out of the coffeehouse." 

Throughout the whole time, before 
and during the game, Newlove was 
climbing up and down the Pauley 
steps. If he ever entered a stairmaster 
competition, this guy would win. 

"My worst nightmare is falling 
down the stairs during a game on 
national television," he said, shaking 
his head. 

"He's probably one of the best boss- 
es I have had," said Gil Cardon^a fifUi- 
year sociology student and senior stu- 
dent supervisor for Newlove. "He has 
the necessary technical skills and 
knowledge of a good manager." 

For Newlove, it's more than that. 

"It's working with the students that 
I like the most, it's what makes it dif- 
ferent from the rest," Newlove said, 
"This isn't just a dead-end job. If they 
want, students can get a lot out of this." 



PORNO 



From page 1 

According to Cross, the Vice 
Squad has also visited this residence. 

"A couple of years ago, we did 
shoot something in the backyard but 
it's totally secluded," Cross said. 
Throughout the years, the house has 
been the location where several mod- 
els for the videos were interviewed, in 
which "they tend to wear alluring 
clothing." 

These events could perhaps be 
responsible for the anonymous phone 
calls that Cross received at the house. 

"The things she said were highly 
sexist and racist," Cross said. He feels 
they were close to harassment. 

But one Westwood homeowner is 
looking past the tenant to the landlord 
of the Weyburn building: Ira Smedra. 

Jackie Freedman, co-president of 
the Holmby-Westwood Property 
Owners Association, had heard that 
there was a pornography business in 
the Village. After walking by the loca- 
tion, she became suspicious and 
called the vice squad. 

Outside of her disapproval of this 
sort of tenant in the village, she looks 
to the property's owner, Ira Smedra, 
as the one who is responsible. 

"It shows disregard to the village," 
Freedman said. "And he has left the 
property in deplorable conditions." 

But Smedra insists that he had no 
idea who was renting the small 200 
square-foot office space from him 
and only spoke to someone at the 
office for the very first time last week. 

His agent took care of the lease 
with Hot Body International, who 
claimed they were a telemarketing 
company, a business Smedra consid- 
ered legitimate. 

"It is to some degree telemarket- 
ing," Cross said. "It is direct market- 
ing; we ship things there." 

When Smedra spoke to a Hot 
Body employee last week, he was told 
that tapes were distributed from the 
office but there is no filming taking 
place there. 

"Everything is fine. It's not like 
business is being done there. It's not 
like it is a studio. There is nothing sin- 
ister going on there," Cross said. 

But Smedra doesn't understand 
how the residents discovered what 
was going on in the Weyburn office. 
"If the homeowners know what the 
man is selling, then they must be buy- 
ing it," he said. 

Despite just being a distribution 
center, Smedra evicted Hot Body 
International at the beginning of this 
month, giving the company 60 days to 
find another distribution center. "We 
don't allow adult uses," he simply 
stated. 





1 \\L> 


I'.l. 


, \ I 


TV 


<;o,\ A 


)N 


. 




1 



A 




li.iii Ciil, deep Ltiiulitioner 

^i' hi<|lili(|)i(: ^sjQ 

ll<iir C (it, <let |< ( .iiiriitioncr 

6*^ piiin: sso 

IKiii C (It. fU-cp coiulitionci 

t< dr>: 5 20 

ll<iir Cf)luriii({: ^20 

Kc.iiifidit li.iii sfvic: — S7() 



I -> > I %'M licstuood hl\<l. 
>lortii of Ohio 
ttl: ( ^lO) »7^ 0(>€»6 
179-9325 



Open Siiii(i.i> •» 
IValk ins lielcoiiUMl 



•ON C^.DA 



UCLA 




( all Nmir Parcniv 



Airline Rocrvatioiis 



Pictures 



— www.commencement.ucla.edu 
'J 



Dinner Reservations 



I'.irkinii 



It s uctlint: I lose. 



Personal Ads are now being accepted 
for the Bniinlife YeaitMok at 1 18 
Kerckhoff Hall. Place an ad for a 

fellow graduate. Tell your friends, tell 

your |>arents, tell eveiyone! Call 

825.2640 for further I nfw in a t k m. 

Huny! Deadline is February 23! 



^\y'>\ 



bniinKfe 

YEARBOOK 




to the recipients-of the 

^^iorspotJigtrt 



Bruinlife Yearbook would like to 

corigratulate the 15 winners of 

the Senior Spotlight Award. 

We would also like to thank all 

who expressed interest and 

took the time to apply. 

, : Good luck and continued 
success in your future 
endeavors. 



'w>\ 



bruinlife 

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Jeffrey Canceko 
Jennifer Hertz 
Ben Hofilefia 
Catherine Krum * 
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Matthew Pirnazar 
Roslyn Soto 
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20 Thunday,M>niiry19,1998 



Daily Bruin View|Mint 



VI EWPOI NT 



viewpoint#media.uda.edu 





BSW 



Getting your 
money for free 

Thumbs up to a 
Senate bill proposing 
an all-out ban on ATM 
surcharges, regardless of the 
machine's owner or location. 
Because many students are on 
fixed and low incomes, and 
have many banks From home- 
town accounts, students have 
been hit hardest by the outra- 
geous ATM service charges. 

Arrests ignore 
the problem 

r^i Thumbs down to the 
j ▼ [ arrest of three students 

^^-' at Michigan State 
University on Feb. .10. Seven 
members of Movimiento 
Estudiantil Xicano de Aztlan 
participated in the protest 
minutes after MSU Provost 
Lx)u Anna Simon welcomed 
students to MSU President 
M. Peter McPherson's State 
of the University address. The 
protesters shouted. "Give us 
the Chicano studies program 
now, or are you afraid of an 
educated Chicano?" 

Officers were called in to 
arrest the protesters because 
they interrupted a planned 
university event, which is a 
misdemeanor. The university 
and McPherson has long been 
criticized by students and 
local residents due to the uni- 
versity's poor retention of 
Latino and Chicano students 
and because of the lack of a 
Chicano studies program. 

Nixing rights* 

r^ Thumbs down to the 
J V • repeal of a gay-rights 
■^^ law passed last spring 
in Maine. The campaign to 
put an end to gay rights found 
lots of support from rural por- 
tions of the state, while sup- 
porters of gay rights won in 
urban areas. 

Conservative religious 
groups failed in an anti-gay 
rights vote two years ago and 
had fought since then to gain 
the victory. 

Pre-election polls revealed 
that 60 percent of Maine vot- 
ers polled were in support of 
recognizing gay rights, but the 
anti-gay rights activists were 
better able to pool their sup- 
porters, most of whom were 
drawn from Maine's conserv- 
ative religious core. Both 
groups plan to c^tinue fight- 
ing on each of their platforms. 

Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down 
represents a majority opinion 
of the Daily Bruin Editorial 
Board. Send comnf>ents or sug- 
gestions to 
thumbs^media.ucla.edu 




9 through Vietnam's mysteries 




REFLECTION: Tangible 
artifact brings war home 
to child's imagination 

There are some artifacts that 
hang in the most unusual 
places, and throw shadows on 
the unlikeliest of innocents. There 
are words that are never uttered for 
fear of explanation and there are no 
explanations for a very elite conglom- 
eration of 
events that per- 
meated the '70s. 
There were no 
words offered 
to me, so at 10 
years old I had 
woven my own 
images of 
Vietnam from 
the threads of 
documentaries 
on PBS. 

M.A.S.H.{even 

though it was 

set in Korea) on Channel 1 1 and 
scraps from my father. Thesp things 
all helped to explain the war, but at 
10 there was more room for contex- 
tualizing with a visual aid. My vehicle 
for understanding hung on a nail in 
the garage, dark and heavy. 

It must have been 1986 when I 
noticed them. One afternoon. , 

strangely void of one the WASP-y 
after-school activities designed for 
blooming young ladies, I went out 
into the garage determined to find 
something new to play with. This 
cemetery for hobbies, fashion and 
tools held spiders, dust and mystery. 
On the left side, next to the never- 
used red Peugeot racing bike, a box 
of National Geographies, and a pair 
of cranberry New Balance running 
shoes, hung the objects of my fixa- 
tion. Pendulous black leather combat 
boots swollen with valleys of creases. 
Thoy looked too heavy to be sus- 
pended on a nail by the thin laces 

Turner is a big Elvis fan who is kx)king 
for a ride to Memphis in June. 



that had been knotted together at the 
ends. The first time I saw them I 
thought of Beetle Bailey cartoons 
and the punk rockers I'd seen in 
front of the high school. The next 
thing I thought was, "these things 
lived through Vietnam." 

I sat down in a stupor about three 
feet away from them, avoiding the 
puddles of Volvo grease and the rest 
of my sanctioned little-kid universe. 
Spellbound by the evidence, I acci- 
dentally and immediately gave birth 
to a ritual that I kept up for years. To 
this day I don't know if it started 
because I was a sensitive kid with a 
vivid imagination or just ^ young 
dramatic determined to feel the 
tragedies of the world. Either way, 
there's no denying that these boots 
forced me to feel things. I would look 
at them for about an hour, starting 
off with images of gore, blown-up vil- 
lages, grotesque 
injuries, clips I'd 
seen on documen- 
taries and still pho- 
tos from books 
secretly stationed 
on my father's 
night table. A 10- 
year-old's media 
montage of war. 
The next step 
was the audio. I 
would create 
the scninds the 
boots had 
made on 



different firmament. The slurping 
they would do in a swainp, the crush- 
ing and swishing through dry bush, 
the thud on the platform of a heli- 
copter. I made a movie of my own. 



I couldn't think of 

anything else one 

could lose. 



letting the images and the sounds 
merge into a fantastical ghastly 
opera. Thfr. first time I did it I remem- 
ber getting up and gingerly turning 
one of them over, half expecting the 
sole to have clumps of dirt and blood 
and hair stuck to it, relieved at the 
tic-tac-toe of dried beige 
soil. It looked mundane, 
like the stuff in my 
backyard. I let 



go and tried to keep my distance, still 
wondering exactly where the soil was 
from. 

The next part of my ceremony was 
the worst, because I let the tangible 
boots go, and I began to let leased 
but legitimate misery in. I began 
mourning for people I'd never met 
or harmed. I was allowed to be sad in 
my secret garage. I imagined all the 
families dissipated in the blasts, all 
the kids like me and my little brother, 
all the grandmas (and on and on and 
on until I imagined how it felt to lose 
everything I'd ever known). When 
the anxiety had nearly peaked, and I 
couldn't think of anything else one 
could lose, I would hit the crescendo 
and mourn the living - my soft- 
smiled father and all of the heavy 

SeeTINMER,pa9e22 




Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



Tbw«lay,Febniary19,1998 21 



Constituents loise when winner takes all 

VOTING: Race panel must 
call into question, replace 
outdated electoral system 



ByStMmiHHI 

"This land is your land, this land 
is my land, from California to the 
New York islands." 

President Clinton's panel on race 
relations has swept across the coun- 
try and finally arrived in 
California. California is a most 
appropriate state for such a dis- 
cussion, being home to a smor- 
gasbord of 30 million Latinos. 
Asians, African Americans, 
whites, immigrants, Nattve 
Americans and everything in 
between. California has given us 
Propositions 187 and 209, two 
bitterly contested rollbacks of 
immigration rights and affirma- 
tive action - as well as the 
Rodney King riots and the O.J. 
trials. 

How will so much diversity 
ever get along? 

An important corollary to this 
question is this: how will all that 
diversity ever win fair represent* 
tion in the legislatures? The two 
questions are related, because if 
voters don't feel represented, it's 
not likely they'll feel welcome 
either. 

The irony of the type of democra- 
cy used in California and the rest of 
the United States^ that the single 
representative elected to each dis- 
trict seat is supposed to represent 

Hill is the West-Coast director of The 
Center for Voting and Democracy, a 
nonprofit organization based in 
Washington, D.C. 




everyone residing within that dis- 
trict. There persists this odd notion 
that an elected official "represents!' 
you just because they occupy the 
district seat, even if you didn't vote 
for them and they are diametrically 
opposed to your point of view. Yet 
there are districts where a white 
Christian Republican lives next 
door to a Latino single mom 
Democrat who lives next door to a 
Korean small-businessman who 



lives next door to a duplex where a 
gay Reform Party computer pro- 
grammer is rooming with a black 
Green environmentalist, etc., etc., 
ad infinitum. 

Asking a single representative to 
straddle the ideological divide 
between so many perspectives is 
becoming increasingly impossible. 
The result is that millions of voters 
from different races and partisan 
perspectives have to compete 



against 

each other in a zero-sum 
game for representation - 
win representation, that 
means you don't win. 

This dynamic exacerbates 
racial tensions in several 
ways. In most districts, 
minorities don't win repre- 
sentation because they need 
an unattainable plurality or 
majority to win. The U.S. 
Senate, which competes with 
Britain's House of Lords as the 
most un-representative body among 
Western democracies, has exactly 
one black and no Latino Senators. 
Historically, we've tried to reme- 
dy such inequality by gerrymander- 
ing a certain number of districts so 
that a particular minority group is 
made into the majority. But this can 
have the effect of excluding other 
racial minorities within that district. 



What's more, districts drawn for 
racial representation are becoming 
increasingly risky, as they have come 
under judicial fire with some racial 
districts being tossed out by the 
courts. 

Also, the inability of single-seat 
districts to fairly represent diversity 
within the districts exacerbates ten- 
sions between urban and suburban 
areas. 

Republicans have given up trying 
to win in most cities, which are , 
racially-mixed and usually 
Democratic strongholds. 
Republicans tend to concentrate 
instead on the white suburbs. This 
polarization has far-reaching ramifi- 
cations for cities since Republican 
legislatures have little to gain politi- 
cally by supporting urban policy. 
Not surprisingly, a number of states 
are being sued over spending dis- 
crepancies in school funding 
between urban and suburban areas. 

The national dialogue on race 
must move beyond conversation, 
identifying real-world institutional • 
barriers that perpetuate and exacer- 



See Hlli, page 23 



Got something to say, 
but don't know where 

to say it? Be a 
Viewpoint columnist! 
Applications are now 
available in the Daily 
Bruin office, located in 

118 Kerckhoff Hall. 
Applications are due 

Friday, Feb. 27 at 5 
p.m. Late applications 
will not be accepted! 



Discourse with students should be encouraged 



HISTORY: Department 
head distorts facts after 
rejection of endowment 



By Vadiik Petrossian 

The article published by 
Richard Von Glahn. chair of 
the department of history, in 
UCLA Today (Jan. 12) raises some 
important points to consider in 
accepting endowed chairs from for- 
eign governments. One can only 
agree that "repugnance toward the 
human-rights record of the Turkish 
government and misgivings about 
accepting money from a foreign gov- 
ernment that can control access to 
the object of study, in this case the 
archives of the defunct Ottoman 
Empire" might have motivated those 

Petrossian is the vice president of the 
UCLA Armenian Students' Association. 



faculty who turned down tl)e chair. It 
is a fact that: 

1. The government of Turkey has 
denied visas and access to the 
Ottoman archives to researchers 
who dp not follow its offici al v ie w of 
the past. 

2. The government has recently 
forced Israel to withdraw the nomi- 
nation of Professor Ehud Toledano 
as ambassador to Turkey because he 
once referred to the Armenian 
Genocide as a fact. 

3. Turkey's government has 
actively epgaged in influencing 
American academia for more than a 
decade and a half 

These are the reasons why lOG 
American writers and academics 
from the most prestigious institu- 
tions, including Nobel Prize win- 
ners, have condemned the academic 
practices of the Turkish govern- 
laent. 

The Armenian Students' 
Association (ASA) is surprised by a 



number of Von Glahn's statements 
and the loaded language he uses to 
make them. The department and fac- 
ulty members were "bombarded," he 
says, with "strongly-worded denunci- 
ations" of what opponents of the 
chair "regarded as the Turkish gov- 
ernment's efforts to manipulate his- 
torical scholarship." This was, he 
adds, "a ferocious storm of protest." 
The ASA, on the other hand, 
believes that the American people do 
still have the right to write letters to a 
department and that UCLA students 
may visit the faculty during their 
office hours to express theircon- 
cerns without having to face such 
innuendo. 

Von Glahn presumes that public 
opinion was manipulated and that 
the student government should not 
have opposed the proposed chair 
without consulting with him. What 
is implied in Such views is that the 
campus community and the student 
government were unable to form 



independent judgments based on 
rational arguments and substantial 
documentiUion, and that free, public 
debate is tantamount to manipula- 
tion, esf>ecially if the outcome of 
such debate goes against one's own 
views. In fact, the stirdent govern- 
ment had done much investigation 
into the issue and had weighed the 
arguments before making its posi- 
tion known. Indeed, students con- 
cerned about human rights abuses, 
moral and ethical issues, and denial 
of genocide do have a right, not to 
say an obligation, to take a public 
stand. 

We are also surprised that Von 
Glahn speaks of "reprehensible 
intimidation tactics (such as threats 
made to (him) and harassment of 
department staff)." A member of 
this student organization did go to 
see Von Glahn. The student prefaced 
his statement by making it clear that 

SccPHIOS$MN,pa9e23 



Racism in America 

Prejudices still run rampant across the nation. Next Friday, Viewpoint will explore racism as it exists today in America and on^ , 
campus. Share your thoughts. E-mail us at viewpoint@media.ucla.edu or bring your submissions to 118 KerckhofF Hall. 

-. The deadline is Wednesday, Feb. 25 at 4 p.m. * . 



DAILY BRUIN 



118 Kerckhoff Hall 

308 Westwood Plaza 

Los Angeles, CA 90024 

(310)825-9898 

http://www.dallybruin.ucla.edu 



I> 


y Editorial Board - 

. Edina Lekovic i^ __ 
y iditar in Chitt 


.' Cheryl Klein 

Arti A Entertainntent Editor 
Oiar>a Lm 

traduction Editor , ^ 
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News Editor 
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Electronic Media Director 
' Aaron Tout 
Photo Editor 


Unsigned editorials represent a 
majority opinion of the Daily Brum 
Editorial Board. All other columns, 
letters and artwork represent the 
opinions of their authors. 

All submitted material must 
bear the author's name, address, 
telephone number, registratron 
number or affiliation with UCLA. 
Names will not be withheld except 
in extreme cases. 


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prohibiting the publication of 
articles that perpetuate deroga- 
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types. 

When multiple authors sub- 


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22 Thuivby, Febnury 19. 1998 



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TURNER 



From page 20 

black history he had gained but 
could not hang in the garage. 

That was 12 years ago, and I still 
don't understand everything about 
it (the war, the silence, my need to 
meditate on those damn boots). 
Maybe I was just a weird kid. But I 
can*t hefp wondering if other kids 
had the Feelings I ha'd growing up. I 
never asked. It was not something 
discussed in my assigned circles of 
adults or peers. When I got a bit 
older, my father told me more about 
what he did, what he saw, what can 
never be understood by those who 
weren't there. Every year he would 
give additional increments of infor- 
mation and I would understand a 
little more. In his clearest recollec- 
tions there is no jingoistic war- 
whoop of kick-ass gleaming in his 
eye, there is only the aching hollow- 
ness of a man robbed.'Held at gun- 
point by the comic-book heroes, 
society templates for masculinity, 
matinee idols, and political mish- 
mash that left us with the function- 
ing silent wounded. In his clearest 
moments his eyes explain that he 
holds the atrocities close and will 
always have his vision obstructed by 
the vapors of innate mourning. 

Now that I can discuss it. I'm not 
sur^ow much good it will do. The 
truth is, I still don't understand . I 
want to know how these men came 
home, got married, started families 
and careers after a tour or two. Then 
again, I suppose one doesn't have 
any other choice. I know of people 
who have fathers that served in 
Vietnam (but I don't know any of 
them who talk about). What hap- 
pened in their homes? Was there a 
tacit avoidance concerning the sub- 
ject of where Dad was in 1969? Did 
they discuss it without emotion, were 
their Dads were proud and preachy? 
Miserable? Both? Were they worka- 
holics liable to snap or were they 
stoned? I wonder how other children 
imagined it - the war, that is ; I won- 
der if they asked, if they thought 
about it, if remains classified family 
information. 

The boots still hang, floating in 
functional obsolescence in a 
Southern California garage. I 
haven't done my meditation in 
years simply because it is no longer 
an exercise in imagination because 
when he began to talk about it, the 
Technicolor tragedy I designed at - 
10 turned into a fluffy construction 
of one dimensional images. I didn't 
know war unfil I came face to face 
with it. You see, in the garage, I 
never put anyone in the boots. Now 
they are surrounded by a new pile 
of junk, some Buddy Holly records, 
a box of paper towels from the Price 
club, bottled water and a lawn chair. 
Still impossibly suspended, insou- 
ciant and hanging on the nail on the 
wall. 



Applicatioiis 
for 
Assistant . 
Viewpoint 
Editor 
are available at 
llSKerckhoff 
Hall and are- 
due Feb. 24 by 
5 p.m. 



«^ 



Daily Bnjin Viewpoint 



i HILL 



From page 21 

bate the racial divide. Certainly the 
continued use of single-seat "winner 
take all" districts is one such barrier. 
Fortunately, other options exist. 

From 1870 to 1980, Illinois used 
cumulative voting in three-seat dis- 
tricts to elect its lower house. If 25 
perCent^f venters supported orrly 
one candidate, that candidate was 
sure to win, giving minority voters 
a chance to win representation. 
This relatively minor modification 
of winner-take-all rules had a pro- 
found impact on Illinois politics. 
Nearly every district, even the 
Chicago districts, had two-party 
representation of both Republicans 
and Democrats, fostering biparti- 
san support for urban policy and 
giving voters more choice^ better 
representation and creating more 
competition. In 1995 the Chicago 
Tribune editorialized, in support of 
cumulative voting's return, "Many 
partisans and political indepen- 
dents have looked back wistfully at 
the era of cumulative voting. They 
acknowledge that it produced some 
of the best and brightest in Illinois 
politics." 

Even more effective would be to 
convert the U.S.-style "winner take 
aH" voting system to a multi-seat 
proportional representation system. 

South Africa is following this 
example in its post-apartheid era. In 
their first multiracial election, white 
and black ethnic minorities and the 
black majority won their fair share 
of seats without a single gerryman- 
dered district. Moreover, the main 
parties reached out to voters of both 
races by running multiracial slates 
of candidates. Rather than polarize 
the nation along racial lines, the pro- 
portional election helped unify a 
fragile democracy. 

President Clinton's panel on race 
relations ought to question seriously 
this reliance on "winner take all" sin- 
gle-seat districts. It's an antiquated 
18th-century method that just isn't 
capable of serving the needs of a 
multi-racial, multi-partisan democra- 
cy, hurtling toward the 21st century. 

Leaders as diverse as Clarence 
Thomas, Kevin Phillips, Eleanor 
Smeal and Congresswoman 
Cynthia McKinney have expressed 
an interest in exploring new 
approaches. It's long overdue, and 
now is the time. 



PETROSSIAN 



Thursday, February 19, 1998 23 



From page 21 

he had come not to bother the chair 
of the department but to share his 
concerns with him and to ask him a 
few questions. The student remind- 
ed Von Glahn that accepting the 
chair with conditions from a govern- 
ment with such a deplorable record 
of deniahsm, human rights viola- 
tions and lack of academic freedom 
would damage the academic integri- 
ty of the university, and that if the 
chair were accepted, the issue would 
not fade away, for the community 
felt strongly about it. Von Glahn 
gave the unexpected response that 
he regarded this as a threat and 
added in an uncivil manner: "You 
don't give a shit aboyt the integrity 
of the school." 

Not only does the ASA condemn 
any threat and harassment tactics, 
but we call on Von Glahn to come 
forward and give proof of such 
actions. At a time when many com- 
plain about asserted student apathy 
with regard to social and civic mat- 
ters, one would expect that the uni- 
versity as a whole, and department 
"chairs in particular, would encour- 
age students engaging in meaningful 
exchange of views with the faculty. 
We regret the chairperson's slanting 
of the facts in the wake of his depart- 
ment's rejection of the Turkish 
chair. ' 




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24 Thursday, Ffbruary 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin Am & iMertMnment 



Thursday, Fefaruaiy 19, 1998 25 



ARTS 




ENTERTAINMENT 




Director Kevin Smith broadens his 

career and renews public interest 

in comic books by launching 

''Clerks. (The Comic Book)" 



— 1 




,fa^- , 


I 

■4-, 

It 




■ • 



His leading man. Ben AlHeck. awaits 
the Oscars to find out if he will win the 
prestigious Best Screenplay award for 
"Good Will Hunting." His leading lady. 
Joey Lauren Adams, leaves his crew to 
pursue other interests. So. not to be out- 
done, director/writer Kevin Smith will 
soon release a line of ... comic books? 

"I just always wanted one day to get 
into writing comics." Smith explains. 
"Even before getting into film I was 
kind of leaning towards writing comics 
and this just seemed like the easiest 
way. to do something based on the stuff 
we've done." 

The comic book series will be "based 
on his debut film, "Clerks." which 
established Smith as a creative force to 
be reckoned with. His following films. 
"Mallrats " and "Chasing Amy," have 
continued to bring him success, though 



neither has yet appeared in comic book 
form. His "Clerks" comic hit stores 
Wednesday - both Smith and his artist 
Jim Mahfood will be signing the first 
issue at the Golden Apple Comic Book 
Mega-Storc on Melrose Saturday from 
2p.mto4p.m. 

"This is the first time I've done a 
comic book signing." Smith admits, "l 
was at the San Diego comic con last 
year signing posters and books, like the 
screenplay book of 'Chasing Amy' and 
'Clerks,' and the response was over- 
whelmingly positive. We were quite 
busy the whole time that we were 
there." 

While the "Clerks" comic will hold 
most of Smith's attention at the 
moment, a 15-page Jay and Silent Bob 
comic will soon be released as well. The 
piece already appeared last month as 



part of an Oni Press anthology titled 
"The Oni Double Feature." though it 
has yet to become the mini-series con- 
necting the end of "Chasing Amy" to 
the characters' arrival on the set of 
Smith's film in progress, "Dogma," 
which Smith has envisioned. 
Meanwhile, Smith has no hesitations 
about attending comic book conven- 
tions in support of his work. 

"The big joke about comic book fan? 
is that you'll go to a comic book show 
with a friend and kind of Took down 
your nose at everybody and feel like, 
'Look at those fucking geeks,'" Smith 
admits. "And across the way, the geeks 
you're looking at are looking at you, 
going. 'Look at those fucking geeks.' 
Nobody wants to own up to being what 

See SMITH, page 29 




(Top) Kevin Smith (right) will be in Melrose Saturday to sign a comic book he wrote based 
on his debut film "Clerks." (Above! A scene from "Chasing Amy" centers around characters - 
Silent Bob and Jay - who work m ^he comic book industry. _.-- ^^ 



.1 I > -v . ! 



id* 



'Fault' motions are now an art form 



DANCE: Movements of 
earth, dancers brought 
together to flow as one 



6y Jammie Saiagubang 

Daily Bruin Contributor 



There's a whole lot of shaking 
going on - both metaphorically and 
physically - in "Fault," the new work 
by the Margaret Jenkins Dance 
Company which shows at the 
AViltern Theater Friday and 
Saturday. 

"'Fault' resonates. not only geo- 
logically, but politically and histori- 
cally as well," says Margaret 
Jenkins, the director and founder of 
the company. "I was interested in 
making a work in collaboration with 
my company and other associates 
that would investigate the different 
ways in which that metaphor res- 
onates under the ground and above 
the ground." 



"Artists (must) be aware 

ofthe social and 
historical fault lines we 
all have to negotiate." 

Margaret Jenkins 

Margaret Jenkins Dance 
Company founder 



Jenkins was first hit by the idea 
when a repertory dance company in 
Salt Lake City commissioned her to 
do a work about the Great Basin. 
She did extensive research and dis- 
covered the themes that would shape 
her work. 

"Looking into the nature of the 
land felt very poignant because 1 
think there arc so many things about 
how the land forms.and disrupts and 
splits and displaces and ruptures and 
resists that are of course parallel to 



the nature of the human being," 
Jenkins comments. "I think that it is 
critical that artists be aware of the 
social and historical fault lines that 
we all have to negotiate." 

She describes the first half of the 
piece as having a dense texture, a 
sort of "underground" feel, very rich 
and colored with activity. The sec- 
ond half seems sparse and quiet in 
comparison. " ^- * 

"The first half is like looking at 
the exterior of the landscape, at lots 
of rocks. The second half is then 
breaking that rock open and looking 
inside," Jenkins says. 

Helping her convey the seismic 
metaphors are myriad people. 
Dancers, musicians, composers and 



a poet worked together on "Fault." 
"It's a natural part of how she 
makes her work, to collaborate 
intensively with all the media 
required to make a dance." says Paul 
Dresher. whose ensemble performs 
the live music for "Fault" at the 
UCLA and Chicago performances; 
"The process that you use to collabo- 
rate, the nature of how you define 
how decisions are made really deter- 
mine a great deal about the work 
itself." 

David Lang is one of the two com- 
posers of the score for "Fault" and 
wrote the music for the Paul Dresher 
Ensemble. Lang's work is primarily 

See JENKINS, page 32 




l)CLA rpnirf tof 

The Margaret Jenkins Dance Company performs in "Fault. 



the HPfKKrnirxj Afi', 



Oiina, US. open dialogue about movies 



FILM: Goal is to deepen understanding, 
develop relationship between countries 

By Louise Chu 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

. There's more to Chinese cinema than a wealth of Jackie 
Chan movies and John Woo films. 

Unfortunately, the majority ofthe American public is not 
privy to such Chinese national treasures as "Ju Do," "The 
Lin Family Shop" and "Red River Valley," which is what" 
prompted the Celebration of Chinese Cinema, a three-day 
film festival that began Friday at UCLA and included a sem- 
inar on "Filmmaking in the U.S. and China: Divergence and 
Convergence," on Saturday in the James Bridges Theater. 

The film festival was a unique opportunity to see the direc- 
tions Chinese film has taken in the past decade, a time when 
China's film industry grew significantly Ofthe 10 films that 
were shown, many arc rare or are not available in the United 
States. 

As an attempt to deepen mutual understanding and devel- 
op relationships with their American counterparts for future 
entertainment Ventures, a IOi)erson delegation of Chinese 
film industry leaders, including Zhao Shi (vice minister of 
film, tclevisKm and radio), Han San Ping (president of the 
Beijing Film Studio) and internationally acclaimed director 
Zhang Yimou ("Raise the Red Lantern" and "Ju lib") met 
with American film scholars and professionals 

Some of those on hand for a panel discussion about the 
artistic, economic, political and social aspects of film includ- 



ed Michael Medavoy (chairman and chief executive ofTicer 
of Phoenix Studios) and Steve Stabler (co-president of the 
Motion Picture Corporation of America). 

"The central question is, of course, the debate between art 
and politics and censorship," said UCLA Professor Joshua 
Muldavin, co-chair of international development studies and 
the panel's moderator. 

Muldavin began the discussion with a focus on the issue of 
film censorship by governments, ratings systems, the audi- 
ences and religious organizations. 

Medavoy continued by giving a general background on 
the American film industry "from which discussion is possi- 
ble." He explained the importance of American motion pic- 
ture companies and the large role that investors must play in 
the making of a film. 

"To give you an idea ofthe value of one of these compa- 
nies, the last conglomerate that was sold was Paramount 
Pictures, which was sold for about $1 1.5 billion," Medavoy 
said. "It takes a billion plus dollars to operate one of these 
companies .. Three hundred-fifty to 4(X) films are released a 
year by the major companies. This is, in some way, why art 
must coexist with commerce." 

Then it was China's turn. Speaking through an inter- 
preter, as did the other members of the Chinese rinlrptinn. 
Zhao offered some background on the Chinese film inditi y. 

"The Chinese film industry has a history of over 90 years. 
It is developing tremendously, especially since the founding 
ofthe People's Republic of China in 1949, especially since 



SceailNA,|M9«30 



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^..'^"ri'Si^fiJi;^ i 



26 Thunday, Febniary 19, 1998 



^Dkily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



Filmmaker Julie Davis does exactly what she has to 



• • 



FILM: Director feels few 
works explore sex lives 
of heterosexual women 



By Louise Chu 

Daily Baiin Contributor 

Standing in a freezing cold phone 
booth in the middle of Sequoia 
National Park at night, Julie Davis 
was getting something done. It wasn't 
necessarily easy for her, but her com- 
mitment to doing an interview with 
The Bruin was something thai she 
intended to honor. The weakened 
phone lines from her room made this 
the only available alternative. She did 
what she had to do. And she always 
has. v - ^ . 

After an unusual film career work- 
ing as an extra on movie sets, editing 
low-budget Korean action movies 
and working for the Playboy 
Channel, Davis realized her dream in 
the form of "I Love You ... Don't 
Touch Me!" a movie that the 28-year- 
old wrote, produced, directed and 
edited. 

The film is a comedy about Katie 
(Maria Schaffel), a 25-year-old virgin 
and hopeless romantic in search of 
Mr. Perfect in the Los Angeles singles 
scene. 

Before she could actually get the 
movie made, she ran into consider- 
able financial difllculty. She invested 
her life savings into the project and 
even sold her grandmother's antique 



diamond ring, which she ultimately 
felt was the right decision. 

"To me, it was just something hid- 
den away in a safe-deposit box,'' 
Davis explains. "The movie was 
something I could share with the 
world, and the ring was something 
that would just be on my finger, and 
there was no comparison." 

With a meager budget of $40,000, 
Davis was forced to spend the money 
conservatively, opting to shoot many 
of the scenes in both her and her 
friends' apartments. 

Ironically, of her many jobs pre- 
ceding the making of "I Love You ... 
Don't Touch Me!" her stint as an edi- 
tor for the Playboy Channel seemed 
to directly have the greatest cITect on 
her in making the movie. 

"I think (that Playboy influenced 
my perspective on love and sex) a lot 
because it really helped me get into 
the male psyche. And 1 think ii really 
helped me write men as realistic char- 
acters," Davis says. 

Yet she is quick to admit that work- 
ing at Playboy was initially an unset- 
tling experience. 

"Oh, it was pretty shocking work- 
ing at a place like that, " Davis con- 
fesses. "In the beginning, I felt likeihe 
little girl lost in the wilderness. It was 
a very scary place to be working, but 
the people were great, and it actually 
ended up inspiring me to write the 
script because every day I was being 
challenged about what I believed in 
and what I thought about sex 

"So it was a good place to be," 



Davis continues. "I think anything 
that challenges you psychologically - 
what you think about life, your 
beliefs, things that are important to 
yott - is a good thing." 

In the movie itself, Davis found a 
place to directly apply the insight she 
had acquired from her Playboy expe- 



rience. 

"I would say that I applied it more 
in the female perspective of just being 
really confused and enraged by the 
causal attitude that men have toward 
sex," Davis explains. "And in the 
male character, especially in the char- 
acter of Jones - he's a direct voice of 



someone I had worked with at 
Playboy." 

The story, which she reveals is 
"loosely autobiographical," concerns 
a topic that Davis felt needed to be 
addressed. 

SeeMVIS,pa9c31 




Julie Davis'"l Love You 



GoWwyn Entwtatnmcni 

Don't Touch Me!" has garnered much acclaim at the Sundance Film Festival. 



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Daily Bniin Arts Ir Entertainment 



Thursday, Frtniary 19,1998 27 



'Beauty' uses past to iUunninate present 



FILM: Director explores 
16th-century *whores,' 
paradox of modern day 



By Lonnic Harris 

Daily Bruin Contributor . i 

It follows the traditions of "Pretty 
Woman" and "Leaving Las Vegas." 
But these dangerous beauties live in 
Renaissance Venice. 

"Dangerous Beauty." which opens 
tomorrow, unfolds its tale of courtly 
prostitutes as a morality play for mod- 
ern audiences rather than a fable or a 
period piece. At least, that's what the 
director and the cast hope the audi- 
ence gets out the story 

The film, based on a non-fiction 
book called "The Honest Courtesan," 
retells the adventures of Veronica 
Franco (Catherine McCormack), a 
lower-class girl who cannot marry her 
true love (Rufus Sewell) and therefore 
becomes a courtesan (a delightfully 
innocent 16th-century word ^for 
"whore"). 

We learn early on in the film that 
courtesans are the most educated, 
intelligent women in all of Venice 
because, unlike wives, they have no 
responsibility to any husbands or chil- 
^dren. Whereas most of the women in 
the city are oppressed by their men, the 
courtesans are free to do as they 
choose. The whole story plays almost 
as a negative of modern society where 
upwardly mobile women are perceived 



as having more freedom and education 
than any hooker on the streets. 

This paradox is exactly what direc- 
tor Marshall Herskovitz wanted to 
convey Herskovitz. best known for 
producing television's 

"Thirtysomething." and "My So- 
Called Life." tried to use Franco's 
story, however antiquated it may be, to 
say something to modern women 
about the roles they play in society 



The real message of the 

movie is that women 

cannot be treated as 

sexual objects. 



"This particular period piece gave 
us a wonderful opportunity to look at 
certain ironies of how we live today," 
Herskovitz says. "Here's a world in 
this film in which if you are a regular 
woman, you aren't allowed to read, 
you have a marriage arranged by your 
parents, your husband cares nothing 
for you, you're basically a breeding 
sheep and you die young. If you're a 
prostitute, you're educated, you're 
expected to be an artist of some kind, 
you are free to own your own home 
and free to have love " 

The film attacks the notion that 
women can be placed into certain roles 
automatically Franco fights against 



such pigeon-holing by showing off her 
wit and poetic abilities openly, as well 
as familiarizing herself with much of 
the literature and art of the time. She 
becomes, as one character refers to 
her, "a national asset." It is this free- 
dom to be both a sexual being and a 
learned, productive person that 
Herskovitz hopes all women can one 
day achieve. 

"The movie's trying to Si«y that it's 
time to allow people to be integrated as 
one self, which includes sexuality." 
Herskovitz explains. 

For obvious reasons, the film delves 
very deeply into the issue of sexuality 
and how much of a woman's overall 
nature is made up of her physical 
appearance and her sensuousness. 

For Herskovitz and the other cre- 
ators of "Dangerous Beauty." the real 
message of the movie is that women 
cannot be treated as sexual objects, but 
are beings, for whom sexuality is one 
small portion of their overall personali- 
ty He finds hope that these views are 
coming to fruition in the younger gen- 
eration. 

"There has begun to be a voice, 
especially among younger women, that 
I don't want to be seen that way any 
more,'" Herskovitz says. "'I don't 
want people to judge me by my sexual 
partners, or my number of sexual part- 
ners, or what I wear to work. It's my 
damn business."' 

The focus on sexuality is also a con- 
cern for actress Catherine 

SeeDMIGEItOUS,pa9«}1 



Mozart's 'Magic Flute' returns 
with fantastic, wNmsical style 



MUSIC: New director, 
format makes classic 
more colorful, exciting 



By Rccd Johnson 

Los Angeles Daily News 

An overgrown schoolboy. An 
• oversexed genius. 

Ever since Peter Shaffer's play 
"Amadeus" and Milos Forman's sub- 
sequent movie version, that's been 
the popular, if widely debated, image 
of Mozart. 

Yet as the LA. Opera's current 
revival of "The Magic Rute" reminds 
us. it takes a very mature artist to see 
the world like a hyperimaginative 
adolescent. Set halfway between lush 
children's fable and pre- 
Enlightenment allegory. "The Magic 
Rute" exists in a state of magically 
arrested development - ever anxious, 
ever hopeful and forever promising 
that whatever's around the corner 
will be better than what we have now. 

Originally directed by Sir Peter 
Hall, with sets and costumes by 
British illustrator Gerald Scarfe, this 
production stirred international 
interest when it premiered at the 
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 1993. 
^ In its present state, directed by Paul 
L. King, the production's most 
salient feature remains Scarfe's bril- 



liantly conceived design schemes. 

Best-known as a savage political 
satirist. Scarfe makes the most of the 
Dorothy Chandler's massive canvas, 
filling it with richly saturated Froot 
Loops colors, psychedelic rear- 
screen projections and a bestiary of 
whimsical creatures such as a half- 
baboon, half-tiger and a tottering 
penguin with a crocodile's head. 
Scarfe turns Mozart's ancient Egypt 



Mozart's music has 
receivecl a large 

injection of British 

comic-operatic 

irreverence. 



into a pop-operatic fusion of Sesame 
Street and Haight-Ashbury circa 
1967 - a realm simultaneously fantas- 
tic and vaguely frightening. This play- 
fully menacing sensibility permeates 
the production. Mozart's heroes 
were lovers, not fighters, and the 
sweet-sung Fedderly (impressive in 
last fall's "La Boheme") is cut from 
the proper cloth He's pure, if not 
overpowering. 

See FLUTE, page 29 




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28 Thunday, Febniary 19, 1998 



Daily Bniin Arts ft Entertainment 



Israel Museum gives tiny country big chance to sWne 



ART: Nation uses foreign 
donations to fill gallery 
with renowned works 



By Christine Temki 

The Bo$tor> Globe , . 

Like Israel itself, the Israel 
Museum depends on foreign aid. And 
that aid can be staggering in scale. The 
$42 million that New York business- 
man Martin Gruss gave the museum 
two months ago is thought lo be the 
largest cash gift a single donor has 
ever made to an art museum. 

Like Israel itself, the Israel 
Museum suffers mightily when, 
because of bombings, foreigners are 
scared away. Attendance at the muse- 
um can plummet from the million visi- 
tors of a good year lo little rnore ihan 
half that number. 

And, like Israel itself, the Israel 
Museum is a politically sensitive 
place. Consider the reaction to artist 
Roee Rosen's recent installation, 
"Live and Die as Eva Braun: Hitler's 
Mistress, in the Berlin Bunker and* 
Beyond." 

"It's been horribly controversial, " 

.Israel Museum director James Snyder 

says. A year into his tenure as director, 

the Harvard-educated Snyder, the 

first American lo head Israel's nation- 



al art museum, found Tiimself 
embroiled in an art-and-politics crisis 
a la Mapplelhorpe. At a museum vir- 
tually in the shadow of Yad Vashem, 
the Holocaust memorial that is also 
one of the world's most monumental 
and moving ensembles of art and 
architecture, a show about Hitler hits 
raw nerves. :> " '.. 

"The mere fact of Eva Braun's 
name in the title is something some 
people couldn't get around," Snyder 
says. He gave them a chance to vent 
their feelings (venting, especially on 
politicized topics, is a favorite Israeli 
pastime) in a comment book. Lots of 
museums offer such books, and most- 
ly the comments run to "Nice show." 
At the Eva Braun exhibition, you 
could see people patiently filling page 
after page with their thoughts, both 
pro and con. 

One Israeli who didn't bother to do 
so was the Jerusalem deputy mayor, 
who summarily demanded the 
removal of the Eva Braun show, a texl- 
and-drawings fantasy that strays far 
from historical fact. "He hadn't seen 
it, of course, but he accused the exhibi- 
tion of depicting Hitler in a positive 
light," says Snyder. It did nothing of 
the sort. But neither was it a straight 
Na/is-as-monsters prcSentalion. It 
was subtler and more imaginative, and 
that's what got il into trouble. 
Ultimately, the deputy was overruled 



by the mayor, and the show, which 
closed Jan. 3. stayed up for its full run. 
"My only real concern was that 
there was a hint of pornography in it," 
Snyder adds, glancing at the show's 
catalog of drawings that are a cross 



"People said/ We 

need guns and food. 

Teddy Kollek said/ We 

need art.'" 

v^ James Snyder 



Israel Museum director 



^tween cut-paper silhouettes and 
Rorschach tests, with plenty of phallic 
and vaginal imagery. "Nobody said 
boo about that," he marvels. 

The slate of Israel is 50 this year; 
the Israel Museum is 33. That the 
nation had a museum so soon after its 
birth was due to Teddy Koliek, the leg- 
endary former mayor of Jerusalem 
who was also the founder of the muse- 
um and still, at age 86, maintains an 
olTicc next lo Snyder's own. 

Snyder speaks of him in folk-hero 
terms. "People said, 'We need guns 



and food.' Teddy Koliek said 'We 
need art.'" And Koliek thought that 
the nation needed art in the most 
prominent place possible. He saw to it 
that the museum was situated atop 
one of a trio of hills in western 
Jerusalem. On the others are the 
Supreme Court and the Knesset, 
Israel's parliament. The message that 
art is as important as justice and law 
rings clear. 
; The museum's architects, Alfred 
Mansfield and Dora Gad, designed a 
series of stor»e pavilions that sprawl 
over the land, like a traditional Arab 
village. Tlie ground-hugging buildings 
arp inviting, and inevitably invite com- 
parison with the fortress-like com- 
pound of. that other museiun atop a 
hill, the new Getty Center in Los 
Angeles. The Israel Museum is as wel- 
coming as the Getty is aloof. 

In many ways the Israel Museum is 
like any big encyclopedic museum 
with a responsibility to offer its audi- 
ences a soup-to-nuts presentation of 
world art, similar, say, to Boston's 
Museum of Fine Arts (MFA). In 
other ways it's not. Most important, 
while support for a museum like the 
MFA is largely local, the Israel 
Museum's support comes from collec- 
tors and philanthropists the world 
over. 

Because the museum has no acqui- 
sitions funding lo speak of, it relies on 



gifts of art as well as money. Ninety 
five percent of the museum's collec- 
tions have been donated, mostly by 
collectors in the United States and 
Europc.^ Last week, the museum 
announced that it received one of the 
most comprehensive collections of 
Dada and Surrealist art in the world 
from Arturo Schwarz of Italy. 
Including more than 700 paintings, 
drawings, collages, sculptures and 
other objects, Snyder says that "this 
new gift positions the museum as the 
most important center world-wide for 
ejcploring the emergence, flowering 
and continuing influence of these 
movements." 

After the 1996 death of New York 
investment banker John Loeb, most 
of his collection was sold at auction. 
An exception was a major Pissarro, 
"Boulevard Montmartre: Spring, 
1897," which went to the Israel 
Museum. Among those who have 
given entire collections is Hollywood 
producer Sam Spiegel, a 1941 refugee 
from Hitler's Europe. The Spiegel gift 
inclades important works by the likes 
of Cezanne, Degas and Gauguin. 

At a time when so much attention is 
focused on the fate of art looted by 
Nazis, art that in some cases remams 
on the walls of well-known museums 
or auction houses rather than in right- 
ful hands, it's heartening to see that 
important works have wound up in 



Daily Bruin Arts & EntertainiMnt 



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SMITH 



From page 24 

everyone else is, and I don't know, I 
kind of dig on it* *^ ..- '•'..: 



"(The comic book 
industry has) gotten a 

hell of a lot more 
' interesting," 



Kevin Smith 

Director/comic book author 



Proclaiming to have enjoyed 
comics since an early age, only stop- 
ping the obsession in high school 
because he was "too cool or some- 
thing," Smith appreciates the oppor- 
tunity to be a part of the process. 
Though he realizes that many readers 
may pick up his work only because of 
his connection with the film industry, 
he fe^ls^e connection won't negate 
his^<5reative ability. However, it most 
probably will lead to a small amount 
of film fans becoming exposed to the 
world of the failing comics industry 
through Smith's efforts. 

"In the time I stopped reading 
comic books to the time I picked 
them up again, it's gotten a hell of a 
lot more interesting," Smith says of 



the comics world. "Writing just 
became so much better, so much 
tighter, so much more literary and 
adult oriented, that's the plus. The 
drawback is that comics aren't for 
kids anymore." 

With this realization, the industry 
has been hurting. No longer do peo- 
ple like Smith, who grew up on 
comic books, switch over to the new 
lines of adult works with age. 
Instead, kids reach for the joystick of 
their favorite video games, never 
thinking to check out a comic book 
- store once they grow into adulthood. 
"Video games seem to be more 
interactive because you're control- 
ling everything, but with reading 
comics it's like reading books. It's 
more about using your imagination, 
even though with comics it's kind of 



"Comics kind of play 
with a different side of 
your brain than video 
games do." ^ 

Kevin Smith 



laid out there for you," Smith claims. 
"But comics kind of play with a dif- 
ferent side of your brain than video 
games do." 



However, Smith doesn't profess to 
change the world of comics with his 
new line. He plans to keep his work 
on the adult level that his films have 
attained. However, he does admit 
that nowadays, "your average six- 
year-old pretty much knows what 
'fuck' means." 

"Growing up yvith comics, I think 
it instills a kirKl of basic moral 
barometer between right and 
wrong," Smith speculates. "It 
sounds hokey to say, but you learn in 
life there arc good guys and bad 
guys, and you want to be at least a 
decent guy. I mean, that's why I 
think comics got a lot more interest- 
ing in the last 10 years, because even 
the good guys are at fault, and it's 
easier to relate to them. It's not just 
guys in tights beating the shit out of 
each other anymore." 

Though he feels the book he's 
writing is "a far cry from the books I 
usually read," such as Vertigo/DC 
titles, he thinks the humor involved 
will prove it worthy of a good 
perusal. 

Likewise, though his forthcoming 
film, "Dogma," will stray from his 
usual flicks in its ambitiousness, it 
will maintain Smith's dialogue- 
heavy Hair for laughs. Starring Ben 
Affleck, Matt Damon, Linda 
Fiorentino, Chris Rock, Selma 
Hayek and Alan Richtman, it will 
also surprisingly maintain his low 
budget style. 

"Everyone's pretty much doing it 
for reduced, reduced rates," Smith 



admits. "You don't want to get to a 
place where you're forcing your 
friends into cheap labor all the time, 
but I think it depends on the project. 
What the budget is, if you're inclined 
to doing it and they have the time." 



"(In comics today)even 

the good guys are at 

fault, and it's easier to 

relate to them." 

Kevin Smith 



And even though Joey Lauren 
Adams, his ex-girlfriend and the star 
of "Chasing Amy" pulled out of the 
project at the last minute, production 
is still scheduled to take place in 
March. Ideally, the writer/ 
director/comic book author would 
enjoy living his creative parallel for as 
long as possible. Which just may be 
possible if he maintains his laid back 
attitude. 

"1 don't know," Smith relates,"! 
can't solve the social ills, man, 1 just 
want to tell some funny stories." 

COMK: Kevin Smith and artist Jim 
Mahfood will be signing the first issue 
of their new comic book series 4t the 
Golden Apple Comic Book Mega-Store 
on Melrose Saturday from 2 p.m. to 4 
p.m. 



FLUTE 



From page 27 

Same goes for soprano Gwendolyn 
Bradley's Pamina, an innocent but 
determined vocal presence amid 
Mozart's exotic tonalities. 

The remaining cast offers generally 
solid support, though it's a shame to 
have versatile baritone Kurt Ollmann 
underutilized herp as the Speaker. 
Making his long-overdue North 
American operatic stage debut as 
Papageno the bird-catcher, Austrian 
lyric baritone Wolfgang Holzmair 
steals the production with his euphoric 
and self-mocking phrasings. And Sally 
Wolf carries off the Queen of the 
Night's tongue-twisting lyrics ¥/\ih 
aplomb. 

Oddly, at Friday's opening-night 
performance, nearly everyone sound- 
ed a bit muted in Act 1, as if that giant 
pyramid at center stage were a black 
hole sucking up noise. Even Kenneth 
Cox's commanding Sarastro seemed 
distant. 

By contrast, the orchestra was gen- 
tly commanding. Under Sir Peter's 
original direction, Mozart's music has 
received a large injection of British 
comic-operatic irreverence, a Gilbert 
and Sullivan tongue-in-cheek that per- 
mits absurdity without silliness. 
Conductor Julius Rudel, however, 
keeps these l9th-cenAiry impulses in 
check, ensuring that an opera that was 
ahead of its time stays true to the spirit 
of its own age. 




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Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



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CHINA 



From page 25 

the economic reform, which started 20 
years ago." Zhao explained. 

She continued to discuss the signifi- 
cant growth and success of Chinese 
film but admitted that there is still 
much to learn from technologically 
sophisticated countries, such as the 
United States. 

"Although a brief achievement and 
progress has been made in the frim 
industry in the past decade, we are still 
facing some problems. So Chinese film 
professionals try to produce films with 
the highest level of artistic value with 
low cost." Zhao said. "As far as the 
technical is concerned, we are trying to 
learn from the advances of technology 
of the world. We are now adopting dig- 
ital audio-visual techniques, but we still 
have a long way to go to catch up with 
(other) countries." 

One of Zhao's main concerns was 
the relative imbalance in the cultural 
exchange between the United States 
and China. She pointed out that while 
the Chinese seemed to embrace 
American films. Chinese filmmakers 
were having a harder time penetrating 
the American market. This sparked an 
extensive discussion and analysis of 
how Chinese films are and could be 
received by the American audience. 

Stabler agreed with Zhao and 
offered a possible solution. 

"This is the universal problem that a 
filmmaker faces, whether it's art vs. 
politics in China, or art vs. commerce 
in the United Stales," Stabler said. 
'The issue is how American film can 
be seen in China, and how Chinese 
films can be seen in the United States - 
Just to make movies that would appeal 
to the commonality between the two 
countries." 

Medavoy added: 'Things that are 
fresh, thai are different, that speak to a 
person's everyday life in a manner that 
people are accustomed to. that have an 
honesty and integrity to its subjects are 
often the kind of films that Americans 
seem to like." 

He cited "Good Will Hunting" as 
an example. He reasoned that the film, 
written by two relatively unknown 
young actors (Matt Damon and Ben 
Afileck), has achieved tremendous 
success because it "has a kind of 
integrity and honesty that's something 
ofa slice of life." 

Robert Rosen, chair of the UCLA 
School of Theater, Film, and 
Television, examined the appeal of cer- 
tain Chinese films over others and 
found an explanation in two paradox- 
es. 

"The first is defined broader inter- 
national acceptance ... Very often the 
mistake and impression is that because 
American films sell so well, you shouki 
make movies that look like American 
films - that's a bad policy," Rosen said. 
"(There should be) a dialogue with the 
aesthetics of other film artists but ulti- 
mately rooted in your own tradition 
that makes something distinctive that 
can find the niche market in an 
American setting that will attract audi- 
ences." 

Rosen stated that the second para- 
dox vkras that many films that had been 
successful had dealt with "universal" 
issues, and "hence accessible to world 
audiences." 

Zhang confirmed this assertion 
when explaining why he feels his films 
have seen international success. 

"I respect my own integrity," the 
Academy Awards nominated director 
said. "I respect the Chinese people's 
feelinp - I just try to play out their 
lives. ! think one of the reasons my 
films get a response internationally 
would be my concern about people. 
It's a basic kind of humanitarian con- 
cern." 

And v^en the panel opened to ques- 
tions from the audience, it v^^as Zhang 
who was the center of attention, 
prompting questions about his back- 
ground and personal taste in film. 
Apparently, his cinematic message has 
come through clearly. 



Daily Brain Arts ft Entertainment 



DAVIS 



From page 26 

"1 think virginity is a really impor- 
tant topic that's totally neglected 
that's a really big deal for women, 
especially in the college years." Davis 
says. "I think women in the '90s espe- 
cially relate to it because we have so 
much freedom to do whatever we 
want that if you don't take that sexual 
freedom, then people think there's 
something wrong with you; like we 
have the freedom to say 'yes,' but we 
don't have the freedom to say 'no' 
anymore." 

With the recent successes of 
movies like **Swingers" and "The 
Brothers McMullen," which examine 
the romantic lives of young 
American men, Davis felt that film 
audiences were lacking the young 
female perspective. She also asserts 
that the only female group with a 
voice was lesbians, who traditionally 
supported one another more than in 
the straight community. 

"It's almost like we don't have a 
voice at all," Davis says. "You see Ed 
Burns (and) Spike Lee, and they had 
their voice! Where is the young 
woman? Why is it that they have 
something to say and we don't? And 
if we do, it's a chick Hick, or it's made 
by a lesbian. Women don't seem to 
get the chances or have the voice until 
they're in their 40s." 

With this movie, Davis has suc- 
ceeded in addressing those concerns 
and, in that, has realized her dreams 
as a filmmaker. 

"I Love You" earned wide accJaim 
at the Sundance Film Festival, where 
Samuel Goldwyn Company, a divi- 
sion of MGM/UA, picked it up for 
distribution. 

The attention she has generated 
sparked the interest of others, several 
of whom arc now working with her 
on two other screenplays. Davis, 
alongside Mitchell Whitfield, one of 
the stars of "I Love You," has also 
just sold the pilot to a television series 
based on the film, which they hope 
will "be the new Seinfeld." 

Davis did what she had to do ... 
and it paid off. She acknowledges the 
vahie of determination and sacrifice 
and encourages others to do the 
same. 

"I think that right now is when you 
have to start putting it aH together," 
Davis says. "And don't think that you 
can't do whatever it is that you want. 
It's always going to be bard.' but you 
can do it." 



FUM: 'I Love You 
opens tomorrov*^. 



Don't Touch Me!" 



DANGEROUS 



From page 27 

McCormack. who portrays Frarux) as 
beautiful but also strikingly intelligent. 

"Being in this business and working 
in Hollywood is very much about the 
way you look," McCormack admits. 

As well. McCormack took to the 
script in large part because she under- 
stood the character and felt for her 
plight. As a woman. McCormack rea^ 
izes how few opportunities were avail- 
able to females living in the 
Renaissance, or any other period in 
history. 

In addition to sympathizing with 
the Venetian girts' lack of options for 
their future well-being, McCormack 
can now sympathize with the fashions 
that were thrust upon these women as 
well. She had to perform most of her 
scenes in tight-fitting corsets and 
uncomfortable shoes. 

"The restriction of those dresses, 
after three months, really got to me," 
McCormack says. "They're very beau- 
tiful, but the restrictiveness of wearing 
them every day is a very vivid memo- 
ry." 



FILM: 'Dangerous Beauty" opensfriday. 




Thursday, Febniary 19, 1998 31 



WITH COUPON 



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MEXICAN -GRILL 



• Our salsas are macleig^dally us'mgtjnfy top quality produce. 

• We use onJy boneless, skinless, chjcken breast marinated and 
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• Our lean steak is trimmed and charbroiled. 

• Our special recipe beans are madeg^ daily using no lard. 

• Our^^ chips are made In 100% cholesterol-free canola oil 

EAT HERE OR TAKE OUT 

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OTHER LOCATIONS: Newbury Park • WesOake VUage • Sfrn/ Valley • Woodfand HiUs • Beverly HiBs • CarmrHlo • Oximd * Irvim 
• Laguna Niguel • Pasaderta • Valerwia • Notlhrktge • Studio City • Marina DelRey Tohtca Lake • tosta Mesa 



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CWTOHBI. MOT «MJD «ini MIT 
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QMCMOiafBI 

oiMBioncm I 



'i^. 



eoooow-f fU iMOOO 



mmivnon. | 

VUME 

uiouTiom I 



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11 

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UCLA Asian Pacific Alumni Association and Asian Pacific Coalition present: 



Tht Fiflli 



Career Networking Conference: 

"CBteer Challenges fee the Hew Cenfuff- 
An Asian and Pacific Islander Pers|»ectiire 

Saturday, February 21, 1998, 9am - 2pm 
UCLA Aekerman Grand Ballroom 



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A haH-doy career netwerking __ 

ceirference with distinguishea speakers 
and werksheps fecusing en different 
fields, including IcnNr, health, 
engineering, new media, 
entertainment, ieumalism, teaching, 
and business/finance. 



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Rob Fukuzaki 

of Channel 7 KABC-TV News 

Keynote Speaker 



AT&T 

Asian Buying Consortium 

UCLA Alumni Association 

Japanese American Bar Association 

UCLA Career Center 

UCLA Asian American Studies 

Center 



For more information, contact: 

Anson Gong, Ph.D. '95, Conference Coordinator 

310-478-7646 • ansong@physci.ucla.edu 

or 

April Cheng, Asian Pacific Coalition 

310-825-7184 • apc@asucla.ucla.edu 



Co-sponsored By: 

UCLA Chinese Student Association 

UCLA Andersen Asian Management Student Association 

Korean American Bar Association 

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California 

Southern California Chinese American Lawyer's Association 

UCLA Pacific Rim Business Association . 



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Paid for by ASUCLA BOD INTERACTION FUND 



.11 



j^TT^wry ■_^ t «^' 



32 Thursday, February 19, 19^ 



DaNy Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



Institute of Laser Medicine 
100 UCLA Medical Pl.iz.i 

FREE CONSULTATION for Laser Hiir Removal 



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(3 10) 79-1-6399 UCLA L 



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For nwre information please contact 

TTie Women's Resource Center at 

(31(^621^945 



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• Nose 

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S^*^ TERENCE TOY 

Feb 22 •^...►i... 



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24 MR INIO lINf (31 



THU It don't mean a 
^ ^ « thing if it ain t got 

Feb 19 

ZOOT 

v\fing 

Weinvrte you to a l> 
and a hot dance y 

Doots 8PM D.«i 
8:30 to • 
with fttbuluus Bii 
Showtimrs 10: iO! 



AA-80'S 



•11 pvaiMi^ -tiio 

1' r^m ?i w.ih «> 



lancing^l^vai 

I Re*uU$ mgftmry. Riskt, At^ 




MON jeH Young Valerie Carter 
Mark Coldenberg - Steve Curr 



SATIMMMill \\U\\)\\\\ \\\) 
FUNKY HiPPEEZ 



(310) 20S-7m 



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WED MONGOOSE 



BnnQMM you 



WMi dawic dub Nve 
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AnjajdngandK^UnamjM^ 



JENKINS 



From page 25 

instrumental while the other com- 
poser, Alvin Curran, focuses on the 
ordinai*y sounds of life, like wood 
breaking, or billiard balls colliding. 

"There's two different composers 
so there's a question of how the 
music from my world is rubbing up 
against his world," Lang says. "I 
think what (Jenkins) was trying to 
do was get people with different 
backgrounds who would each bring 
something different and then you 
would get a little friction, a fault 
line, from that too." 



'The two different 

speeds the information 

came to you ...would 

allow the music to 

regain its integrity." 

David Lang 

Composer 



Lang describes his work at times 
propulsive, even maniacal, while 
still providing a counterbalance to 
the dance. For example, while the 
dancers perfdtm with tremendous 
activity onstage, the music moves 
along at a slower pace. 

"1 fch that the tensions between 
the two different speeds the infor- 
mation came to you, both visually 
and through what you hear, would 
allow the music to retain its integrity 
and make a comment on what was 
happening onstage, but not domi- 
nate it or get in its way." Lang com- 
ments. "The way 1 interpreted my 
role in this was to be an intelligent 
listener." 

Jenkins' dancers played not only 
important physical roles, but chore- 
ographic roles as well. Hired on a 
project-by-project basis, the nine 
dancers designed all the moves. 
Many of them trained in distinctly 
ditTerent dance backgrounds, con- 
tributing to the fault notion as well. 



'The dance vocabulary, 

the movement that 

you'll see in 'Fault/ was 

originally made by the 

dancers." 

Margaret Jenkins 

Margaret Jenkins Dance 
Company founder 



"The dance vocabulary, the 
movement that you'll see in 'Fault,' 
(was) originally made by the dancers 
in the company and edited and 
directed by me." Jenkins says. 
"They are dancers who come from 
all different kinds of dancing, so the 
piece reflects that as well." 

Jenkins says "Fault" is not a lin- 
ear story. She and her colleagues 
were more interested in providing 
an environment on stage that 
allowed the audience to make up its 
own story. 

''It's not really necessary to see all 
of these oppositions and frictions 
resolved or to come to an explosion 
or climax," Lang explains. "All 
that's necessary is to have the feel- 
ing that there's this internal life of 
struggle." 

DANCE: 'Fault' wrill be performed 
Friday and Saturday at the Veterans 
Wadsworth Theater at 8 p.m. Tickets 
are $30, $27 and $9 with UCLA stu- 
dent I.D. For more information, call 
(310)825-2101. 



Daily Bruin Classified 



Thursday, February 1 9, 1 998 33 



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Housing 

Apartmente for Rent 
Apoftmenls hnmbHed 
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How to Write 
an Effective Ad 

• Start your ad with the merchandise you 
are selling. This makes it easier lor readers 
to quickly scan the ads and locate your 
items. 

• Always include the price of your item. 
Many classified readers simply do not 
respond to ads without prices. 

• Avoid abbreviations — make you ad easy 
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• Place yourself in the reader's positton, 
ask what you wouM like to know atxxjt 
the mercfnndise, and include that in the 
ad. Indude such information as brand 
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announcefflents 




1100-2600 



FOUND- 0— emo Street watch. Nea^ dorms. 
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Alcoholics Anofiymous 

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FREE CASH GRANTS! 

College. Scholarships. Busir>ess. Medical 
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RAISE $500 in or>e week. Fundrais«r>g op- 
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Great for dut>8. For rrxKe irrtormation call: 
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UNIVERSITY CREDIT 
UNION 

UCLA STUDENTS, faculty and staff: benefit 
from low-cost finarxMl services & on -cam- 
pus ATMs. Visit us at Ackerman A-level, on- 
line at www.ucu.org or call 310-477-6628 

HHBLmtnt ^ 




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UlilVERSITY OF LA VERME 

COLLEGE OF LAW 

Quality Legal Education 

JURIS DOCTOR PROGRAM 

• Accredited by the State Bcur of California 

• Innovative & Supportive Environment 

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FOR FALL ADMISSIONS CALL: 

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Woodland Hills, CA 91367 La Verne, CA 91750 

(818) 883-0529 (909) 596-1848 

The University of La Veme is accredited by the 
Western Association of Schools and Colleges. 



• Find A Job 

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Apply to the 1998 Project Pipeline 

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Oakland Airport Hilton 

April 28 -May 1,1998 

Application deadline: March 16, 1998 

— Scholarships for travel and — 

accommodations are available 



Celebrate Diversity 



PREPARE YOURSELF 

• Gmduate by June 1998 • 

• CBESTisamustH • 

CaU916-928-4001 to register 

for Feb. 14 or April 18, 1 998 test elate 

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pass the MSAT -^ 

Call 1-800-722-9476 to register for the next test date 

~ • To teach high school • 

pass the Praxis II and SSAT in your subject area 
Call 916-928-4003 to register for the next test dates 

, For more information 
call us at: 916-924-8633 



PROJECT PIPELINE 

PROVIDINQ CAUFORNIA TEACHERS 



sit 



580 University Ave, Suite 203 • Sacramento, CA 95825 



««P 



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34 Thursday, Febfuary 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin GassifM 




TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 









p. 



^ 



■** 






ACROSS —■ 
1 Scarlet 
4 'Profident 
8 Cream — 

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1 3 Book-jacket item 

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19 Prances about 
21 Framework tor 

plants 

23 Deii bread 

24 Cumnf)erbund 

25 Poet's always 

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29 — over: 

flabbergasted 

31 Chase away 

32 Ftop 

33 Buikls ^^ 

37 Fairy-tale 
monster 

38 Clean the 
blackboard 

40 Exped 

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43 Loud rK>ise 

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(troops) 

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snswoTS 

48 Cow sound 

51 FeNow 

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animal 

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cooks ..." 

68 Calif, hrs. 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 



mum seass amm^as 
[issg]Qa asanas 

Sm@Q DQ1@[DB]DD 

BOQaa OQDg] afflss 

DQSQS maSD QQID 



DOWN 

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ApoNo 

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wine-server's 

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fixtufiM 

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copper 

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doubled 

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DO dOBWBOQ 

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oonven4erK»: 
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So*ff ■ 



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KirGittotfKFtitQfe 



Become a leader 

in enoironmental science 

and management 

(IC Santa Barbara's Bren School 
offers a unique graduate scienttfic, 
interdiscipHnary cturiculum 
incoqx>rating environmental policy, 
management, and law. 

6|ien Ikxise 

Join us in celebrating our $15 
miHion gift from the Bren Fomdation 
Mid find out about our innovative 
program. 

Friday, March 6 from 9 to4 at 
UCSB's University Center 

Please RSVP for the Open House 
by Friday, February 27: 
805^3-7363 or 
open.houseW)ren,ucsb.edu 

OeadUne for af^>licatlon: May I, 1996 




ANONYMOUS sperm donors needed. Help 
Inlerlile couples while receiving financial 
compensation up to $600/nrK)nth and free 
health screening. Convenient hours, located 
in Westwood. Call Masie 310-824-9941 

EGG DONORS NEEDED 

Have you considered helping an infertile 
couple? If you're 21-30 years and willing to 
help, please call. ^11 races needed. Compen- 
sation $3,500.00 OPTIONS 800-886-9373. 

EGG DONORS/SURROGATES NEEDED. 
Ages 21-30. AH Info confidential. Please caH 
310-285-0333. ^^ 

FILIPINO OR CHINESE WOk^EN NEEDED 
as anonymous egg donors. Ages 19-32 Egg 
donors find It emotionatty rewardir>g to h«lp 
anonymous infertile couples. Procedure is 
scheduled around Spring Break, but you 
must attend orientation now. $4,000 com- 
pensation. Call 1-888-411 -EGGS, Kellie 
Snell, Creative Conception. 

JEWISH EGG DONOR 

We are looking for a Jewish egg donor. Can 
you help us? If you can, call 310-828-5788 

SPECIAL EGG DONOR NEEDED! Loving 
infertile couple is hoping to find a compas- 
sionate woman to help us have a t>aby. 
We're hopir^ for someone wtx> has blond or 
brown hair and blue eyes. We'd be delighted 
to find a healthy, intelligent college student 
or graduate. Age 21-30. Thank you for your 
consideration. Compensatkm $3,500- 
$5000-f«xpenses. If you can help us, please 
call 1-800-886-9373 ext.6733. 




Send yeur sttry and 
appeir in TV pilil 

200 wds. or less about something 
unexplainable that happened to 

you, i.e. touched by an angel type 

stories or story in the vain of 
Chicken Soup stories. Deadline: 
February 25th. Send attention: 
Stephanie fax: 8 1 8.99 1 .2024 
e-mail: youmag@earthlink.net 
*plea.se include: name, age and 
telephone #. Authors of stories 
chosen will appear in TV pilot. 



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED (tMF) 18-20 years 
of age for a study on bone health Will re- 
ceive $50 plus f''se nutritional, bone density 
and strength assessment, and comprahen- 
sive blood analysis. Please caN the UCLA 
Osteoporo a la Center at 310-825-6137. 



EGG DONORS 
NEEDED 

If you are a woman between the ages 

of 21 and 35, the many eggs your 
body disposes of each monm can be 
uiea by an infertile woman to have a 
baby. Help an infertile couple realize 
their dreams, enter the gene pool and 
help advaiKe Imowledge of Human 

Reproduction! Financial 

compensation, of course. Completely 

confidential. For more iixiormation, 

please call USC Rcpfodactivc 

Endocrinolagjr at (213) 9T5-999a 




**THC IMULY BRUM ASSUMES NO RE- 
SPOMOIBILITY FOR ADVERTISERS' OR 
CUSTOMERS' EXPERMENCES COMCERN- 
mO ADS M THE PERSONALS SECTION. 



BODY WEIGHT&HOR- 
MONE LEVELS 

VOLUfTTEERS SOUGHT HMHhy young 
women, agaa 17-25, weight between 
80&120R)e., wNh normal periods, to parltci- 
pate in a UCLA project to take 24hrs 
Receive $25.00 for complete participation. 
Or. Ian YipO 31 6-206- 1967. 

NORIML HEALTHY CHILDREN 8-12yrs 
needed for UCLA research study. Ftoceive 
$25 for lab experiment and developmental 
evaluation, and get a s dentili c learning ex- 
perience CaH 310-825-0302. 

PLAY GAMES AND 
^ONEY, TOO! 

Social psychological experiment. 1 1/2- 
hours Average $8 Undergraduate only Call 
310-837-2669 or sign up 235 Haines. 




Arc you or is someone you knowv 184 yean otd and suAei1i>g from Anxiety? Vou 
may quaNfy for an Important medkal research study If your symptoms Include: 

Q Lvcsiive >Mony 
Q Fcdkig Tense or Inltable 
Q DMkuky Concentrating 
Qualified participants may reoeh« up to SSOOiM. 



At CaWoralaGWcal IHab, a premier research fodllty, we are focused on testing 
medlcatlons.4tiat ootid twssibiy improve lives and lead to foture medical braak- 
througf^J^lffed participants will receive quality care from our research stiff, a 
free basic physical exam and lab tests. Enrollment Is limited. Be part of the solution 
and call now, 

TOUrUE 
I-88S-CC-TRIAL 

(l-Sft-22t-742S) 

California Clinical Trials 




f>ff*p Up fo fhe L?jfer;f In 
Rfi?;e«roh for Pfiori?if;i', 



Ars you suffsrir^t from pisqus psortasis? 

If you qualify for our research study, you 
could i^ecieve study-related treatment at no 

cost to you. If you would like more 
-^ — .r— information, please call: 

Lisa at (310) 209-1440 



FREE 
DIABETIC SCREENING 



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825-2221 



Advertise for FREE in B-'iiin Bargains. Items $100 or less. Prints every Wednesay and Friday 



Display 
206-3060 



Daily Bruin aassified 



Thursday, February 19, 199S 35 




dT 



nUPINO OR CHINESE 
WOMEN NEEDED 

as anonymous egg donors. 

Ages 19-32. Egg donors find it 

emotionally rewarding to help 

anonymous infertile couples. 

$4000 compensation. 

Call 1-488411-EQGS, Kellie 
Snell, Creative Conception. 



It 



EL 



dd 




■5^ 




A happily married couple seeks to 

adopt a baby to comptetc our family 

Our two year old adopted (on 

would love to be a big brother. 

If ym CM help im fulfil our dream, 

call Weady/FitKL 

<S00)4M-2S43 Code: 9097 



EGG DONORS! 
WANTED 

1^ you are a healthy 

female between 

the ages of 19 and 

30 and have health 

insurance. 

Compensation 

$3500.00 

Call Mima Navas at 
(310)829-6782 



for sale 




2700 - 4500 



«« 




LAP TOP COMPUTER 



MAC 5300SERIES. 
OtO. 310-360-0827 



Brarxj New. $1800 



PENTIUM 200 MMX. 32RAM. 4.3HD. 
6X4CD, 33.6, 14-inch SVGA 80W Speak- 
eci. Win 95. AH latest adobe Via Voice Tons 
rrtre. $1100.310-823-5101. 




MATTRESS BONANZA!! 

S^ALY.STEARNSAFOSTER. Alao Orthep»- 
die twin-s«ts-$99.95. Futls-$150.95, 
aueena-$1 79.95. Kino»-$229.95. Futons- 
S139.95. We deliver Beacon Mattress 
Whae. 1309 Westwood Blvd 310-477-1466 

MATTRESS SETS!!! 

Twin $79. Full $89. Queen $139, King $159. 
Bonkbeds. Oettv«fi«a. Phone Onjmn Accept- 
ed 31 0-372-2337. 

QUEEN-SIZE BED Unused, stored careM- 
ly, good quaWy Mattress, box. and frame, 
$150 Can deliver 31&«22-3284. 



transportation 



'mm 




4500 - 5500 



"mmmmim 



MB' 



mmm 



iT 



=^ 



READ MY LIPSIII 

You can make $4800 In 

48 hrs. My POWERFUL 

il^OQRAM can put BIQ 

money in your pocket 

FAST? not MLM or chain 

tetter. For free Info call 

Macro Enterprises 

1-888-510-4549 



\ss 



^ 




1986VWSCIROCCO 

Well maintained, sMver-blue, 105K, runs 
good, aluminum rims, new ciutch&tires, car 
phone. Asking $1700. Must see. 310-478- 
6828. 



1988 TOYOTA SUPRA TURBO, automatic. 
wAarga top. Pearl white w/burgundy leather. 
Kemwood CD&alarm. Mint corxlition, new 
turbo/brakes $8495. Davkj 213-933-9033 

1989 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC. 
fourHiJoor. original owner, 58.000 miles, 
white, excellent conditk>n, $3,975. 310-474- 
0555. 

1990 ACURA INTEGRA, 69.000 miles, ex- 
cellent coTKJition, great stereo, alarm Origi- 
nal owner. $6,000 obo. Trey. 9-5 (818)502- 
5600. 



1992 RED CAVALIER Z24 CONVERTIBLE. 
White automatK top/interk>r, AittomatK, head- 
ed One owner, immaculate corxjitkxi. Only 
40,000 miles! $9500 obo 310-471-5326. 

88 TOYOTA MR42. Must sell 5-speed. AC, 
sunroof, extras Super dean! $3,950 obo. 
Call Stephen, 818-504-1177. 

SEIZED CARS FROM 

$175!! 

Porsches, Cadaiacs, Chevys. BMWs. Cor- 
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4-Wheel Drives. Your 
Area. Toll-Free 1-800-218-9000 Ext. A- 1650 
for current listings. 



SEIZED CARS from $175. Porsches. Cadil- 
lacs. Chevys. BD^IWs, Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 
4WD's Your Area Toll-Free 1-800-218-9000 
Ext. A- 1650 for current listings. 

'89 JEEP WRANGLER 4.2 6cyl. HT. 35" 
tires 5' RarKfw suspension $7500 obo 
Jaime ©310-824-4953 Pgr 888-9279 



'89 TOYOTA CELICA 

QT CONVERTIBLE Great k}w mileage car 
(79.000 miles), A/C. P/W. P/S. AH^FM case- 
tte. red/Mack top and interior, new tires 
alami $7,500 Call Makfie Work: 310-319- 
5490 Home: 310-573-0129 Fun car! 

•94 VOLKSWAGON JETTA GL 5 speed. Ex- 
cellent condltton. $8990 Please call 
ZainO310-477-6612, 




STARS CAROL BRUNETT. Roma Downey, 
and John Dye. Reveal the key elements in 
becoming a proleeskxwl actor! Order the 
vkleo The Actor's Succeea Factor' now! 
www.gravttyTebel.com or call 436-855-7552 




Cvc!pTiiiir' Ifisufnncr' Services 



■«Motorcycl«* Motor Scooter •Moped 

I Llabimy Inmutmnom K now »>• l«m( 

— It's tmmm man you miokl 

_ No KiddingI 

Call for a free quote. 
(31 0) 275-6734 



i( Piano Rentals ^ 

if Low Monthly Rates W 

A HoMfMMd Piano R««al Company^ 

^ 213-462-2320^ ^ 7 

••••••#••• 




igeeh' _ 1 50cc. Red. mint condi- 

tton basket $350obo. Call Paul at 626-237- 
9721 



travel 




5600 " 5720 

mmmmmmmmm 




INSURANCE WAR! 

WE'LLBEAT ANYONES price or dont want 
your business. Ail drivers Newly licensed. 
Student/staff /faculty discounts Request the 
"Bruin Plan." 310-777-8817 or 213-873- 
3303. 




f4mcniM 



/lllstatef 

IbuVe in 0ood hands. 

Insurance Company 
(310)312-0204 

1281 Wostwood Blvd. 
C2 t>lk«. So of Wllst-iire) 



Kound I rip ^\irlarc 



HiicnoK .Airi" 

(iiiiiyaqiiil 

Quito 



Package Tours also available 

For .'no b 
R»-s: HOO 2 

rKOFtSblO.\.'\L rK.WEL SCKVI' 
•"^mth \nirri< an Spp<i;ili«;li 
( SI .' i()l7():i'> H) 






GREAT FOR SPRING BREAK. Two tk*ets. 
LA to Orlando or Fort Lauderdale. $200ea. 
212-946-1173. 

LOW AIRFARES Domestk: * Internatkjnal 
http7/¥»ww.travel-about.com. 520-327-1879 



FLY CHEAP!! 

• ROUN> -nop COURSH AlinUE$ • 
Ba a Mtlt lariUt aed smw M| $$$ 



AUTO 
INSURANCE 

''NO BULL'' 

Best Prices, Same Day 



STUDENT DISCOUNTS 



Motorcycles, SR22 
Accidents, Tickets OK 

CALL AA*IA NOW 
FOR FREE QUOTE 



1 (800) 225-9000 




Air Courier International 

1-900-892-7216 24 In. 



AQUA TRAVEL INC 



WORLD WIDE LOWEST AIRFARES 

MAKE YOUR OWNHIR CAR HOTEL RESERVATION AT 

hnpJ/www.pri$mcw9b. comAjquatravel 

24 HOURS A DAY 

Lowest Domesttc and 

Intemotonal Airfares 

Tour Packages 

Eurailpass 

Hotel Accomodotions 

Car Rentals 

*Asio*Africa*Austra«o*Europe*Soutti Ameficfl* 

*ln(»a*C(nKido*Mexb*H(nMr 



IM^MMR IWWilvww • 



AMnt 4MMfe 



MMM and some rerftdtons moy oppty PlutloiiM 

PHONE (310) 441-3680 

10850 NMMe, SMII434, WUltioodCA 80024 



FREE FOOD/ENT. 

— http://www.llielaweb.com Los Angeles' 
HOTTEST internet night guide, to DINING. 
ENTERTAINMENT, and EVENTS. Enter the 
SWEEPSTAKES and win. 




SPEAK SPANISH FAST! 

Central Mexico Live with family Four 
weeks-$875 5classes/day. room&board. 
CALMECAC Calixto 2. Guanajuato, Gto. 
36000 Mexico. modem560qu)jote ugto mx. 




ALONE-STRESSEO-OVERWHELMED 

Supportive, confidential counseling Anxiety, 
depression, relationships. Hypnotherapy lor 
test preparation. IrxJIviduals, couples West- 
wood Village Carole Chasin MA, MFCC. 
310-289-4643. 



Tffpr 



m 



1 



SPRING BREAK!!!! 

ROSARITO BEACH MEXICO. Hotel pack- 
ages S34&UP 1 -888-PICANTI. Space limit- 
ed. 



services 




5800 - 7300 



COUNSELING wiUi CCNMFAS9CM 
Md CONnDENTIAUTY 



t 



KAlENDKRR.PbJ). 

LlcJ13144 

(31^ 337-1684 

KAREN SCHLAFT. Pk.D. 

(31«) 472-4430 

R.MILES UYCHOCO, Pk. D. 
Lk.«14384 

(314) S39-7475 

Westwood Office 





$CASH FOR COLLEGES 

GRANTS & SCHOLARSHIPS avaH. from 
sponsorsllt Great opportunity. CaN now. 1- 
800-532-8890 . 

STUDENT LOANS^ 



Choose University Credit Union to fund your 
Stafford Loan* (Lander Code 832123) Also 
receive low-co4t llnandal sen/icea. 310- 
477-6628; http://www.ucu org 



IS LIFE GEHING YOU DOWN? 



TaWng to tti* MQHT person can halpl 
AFFOtOABlf, QUALITY THBtAPY 

nU>. LJ»»T»w*Won«. 



f^yonoKO^m 
(PSY144«0) 



SoW- Csm w. Awdoty; 

Pfowrt U I Cw wIn B . 

Survlwva ol EmoMonoi. 

Pt«y«toal,or 



AduN ChMran ol AiootwMoa. 

MuMouMwaMMHatMc l««M. 

Couptao ConMcts or 




Classifieris 
825-2221 



More Bruins turn to the Daily Br///V?than any other newspaper. 



M 



Contempo Nails 

Manicures Pedicures 

Rlls & Silks 

Sculptured Nails 

Wax 

& MORE! 

333 Robertson Blvd. Beverly Hills 
(btwn. Gregory Way & Olymptc Blvd.) 
-, . Mof>Sat9-7pm 

Free Partting 
" No Appt Naee^ary 

Call (310) $99-9979 



incKiiiii ^ iin i in i iii ixiJ 



UIgltf llfWiDBr AuBIMyS 



BANKRUPTCY 

Chapter 7/11/13. GET OUT OF DEBT TO- 
DAYtll fHat fee/low cost/paynnent plans. 
Law offices of White &/KSSOC. (UCLAW^') 
800-420-9998/310-207-2089. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

FOR WORKS VISAS and green cards call 
experiefx:ed immigration attorney. Reason- 
able rates and free consultations. Call 213- 
251-9588 for attorT>ey Doreen, 

GREEN CARDIThe Easy-Inexpensive WAY! 
Visas, Work Permits. & Labor Certification. A 
California Corporation SirK» 1982. Immi- 
gration Specialist. CaH: 310-459-9200. 









BEST MOVERS. 213-263-2378 Licensed, 
insured. Lowest rates. Fast, courteous, and 
careful. Many students moved for $98 Lic- 
T- 163844 UO JOB TOO SMALL! 

HONEST MAN W/14ft tnx:k and dollies, 
small jobs, short notice ok. Student discount 
310-285-8688 SF. LV, SD, /V2. Go Boiins. 

JERRVs moving & DELIVERY The care- 
ful movers. ExperierKed, reliable, same day 
delivery. Packing, boxes available. Jerry, 
310-391-5657. GO UCLA!1 




DRUM LESSONS 

All levels/styles with dedicated professional 
At your home or WLA studio 1 st lesson free. 
No drum set necessary. Neil 213-654-8226. 

GUITAR INSTRUCTION 15 years EXP all 
levels and styles. Patient and organized. 
Guitars availabie. Sam 310-826-9117. 

GUITAR LESSONS by professkxial near 
UCLA. All levels, guitars avail. Call Jean at 
310-476-4154. 

LEAST EXPENSIVE guitar lessons. $13/hr. 
my home or $23/hr your fwme. Acous- 
tic&elqcthc. Jutes: 310-398-2480. 

THE BETTER PIAI^ LESSONS- Jazz & 
Classical Music- European Instructor- Inter- 
national teaching experience All Ages/Lev- 
els. Leave message at: 310-307-3012 

VOICE LESSONS. Eastman grad 10-years 
European operatic experierice. Free ttie 
beauty of your voice through good vocal 
technique $40/hr 310-470-6549. 




TEXT ANXIETY 

MidTerma, Finals. GRE. MFCC. LCSW. 
MCAT LSAT. Bar. Call: Fay Shatzkin. C.Ht 
Clinical Hypnotherapist 310-330-8851 




ATTN: MBA, LAW, 
MED. APPLICANTS 

Frustrated devek>p«ng/editing your critically- 
important personal statements? Get profes- 
sior^al help, competitive edge from natkjnal- 
ly-known author/consultant. 310-826-4445. 



JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLASS. San- 
ta Monica CoNege. Business and travel. 
Starting Feb 28-fApril 25 Six Saturdays, 
9am- 12pm. $75. Partidlpation encouraged. 
310-452-9214. 



Display 
206-3060 



36 Thun^,FfbnMry19,1996 



D^tfyBniinQMsifM 



Perscmal Ads are now being accepted 
for the Brainlfte Yearbook at 118 
Kerckhofr HaU. Place an ad for a 

ffeNow graduate. Tell your friends, tell 

your |»arents, tell everyone! Can 

825^640 for further Information. 

Hurry! Deadline is FelMiiary 23! 



I 4* 




91 





Kappm Mappa Gmmma A The Hape 
Treatment Center At Tke Smmm 
).'^^ MtmkM-UCLA Mescal Center 

'\i;>^ THE KAPPA ^^ 
FEAST \^- 

A Dtnlng Extrmpmgama j. 

Feetmring ^*>» 

SHWAG 

Wedttestlay, February 25th 

6:00 PM 

At The Kappa House 

744 HUgmr^Ave. 



TlcUtsAreSS 

Available From Kappa Members 

Or CaU Alexandra 2O9-lg80 










BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITINQ & EDITING 

, F^QpOHli tnd Boota. 



Staran Bmt, PttO. (>K) '170 mil 



BARTENDER TRAINEES 

EARN $100 - $200 DAILY 

2 weekdass 
Job Placement Service 

800/952-2553 

PROFESSIONAL 
BARTENDERS SCHOOL 

Dwoount <»<» Stud>nl to 




Debt Consolidation. Auto Loons. 

Low Interest. Bod credit, 

Bor>kruptcies Accepted. 

Employment Required. 

Fast Response on Approved 

AppHcatior«. 

1-888-281-5110 



IMMIGRATION, Work Permits. Green 
Cards. Citizenship, Investor Visas... 

Anoel V»SA QNTER" 

Reasonably Priced. Reliable. Efficient 
Innnrugration Service. For Free 
CoaaulUiUon Call: 310-478-2899. 

Confidentiality Guaranteed. 



Daily Bruin 

Advertise It Works. 




7200 



PRIZE-WINNING 

ESSAYIST AND FORMER PROFESSOR 
vv/lvw) Ph Ds can help you produce winning 
prose. Theses, papers, personal statements. 
David 310-281-6264, 805-646-4455. 

RESEARCH. EDITORIAL, Word Pr9cessing, 
ar>d complete resume services. 213-444- 
2033 




^ 




PROFESSIONAL 
RESUMES 

ORDER BY PHONE 213-777-9885, or call 
mobile unit direct. 818-697-4028. Pager: 
213-344-7581 http://www.online- 

late.com/danrn/res/irKJex.htm 



ALL WP & RESUMES 

RESUME DEVELOPMENT APPLICA- 
TIONS. LETTERS. EDITING/PROOFREAD- 
ING. FORMATTING DISSERTATION/THES- 
ES. DISCOUNT FOR PAPERS RUSHES. 
ACE AWARDS. ETC. 310-820-8830 

DESIGNER'S ORIGINAL- Word Processing 
Services; Tape Transaction, Business 
Letters, Joumals. Scripts, Term Papers. Re- 
ports. Student Discounts. 24-hours. (310) 
777-0693. TShlene 

WORD PROCESSING specializing in thes- 
es, dissertations, transcription, resumes, fli- 
ers, brochures, matlirig Hsts, reports. Santa 
Monica, 310-828-6939. HoUyvyood, 213-466- 
2888. 





WORD PROCESSING. Typing, prooWng. 
editing, rewritirig, research, transcription. 
etc. Fax, email, mail, bring work to me. 
Rushes. Student discount. 818-830-1546. 



PRE-MED STUDENTS 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF THE CARIBBEAN 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE (AUC). invites you to 

meet witti representatives of the university at AUCs 



Informational Open House 

Sunday, February 22, 1998 

Double Tree Hotel, Anaheim 

100 The City Drive, Orange, CA at 1 :00 p.m. 



Meet AUC graduates - over 2.000 graduates 
since 1978. 

Learn about our medical school program and 
our new multi-million-dollar Academic Comple> 
in English speaking St. Maarten. 



To attend the Open House, 
RSVP by phone at (305) 446-0600, Ext. 
20, or E-mail us at AUCInfo ^juno.com 

Visit AUC's Web-site at www.aucmecl.edu 



Jf 



. -.M«>K-'V •» - 



WINNING RESUMES. 1-hour service Our 
clients get results Open 7 days Visa and 
Mastercard accepted 310-287-2785. 




JAPANESE TUTOR graduated univwiMy in 
Japan. If you vvoutd Mte to laam Japanaaa at 
affordable rates, plaasa caN to dtoousa. SIO- 
837-4891 

MATH TUTORING/CONSULTING by Ph.D. 
Chenwtry. Physics. Engksti. Elamantary Ifwu 
graduate school. Post-Ph.O. WLA. 310-398- 
0603. 

PRIVATE TUTOR $2S/hr. avoid high agerwy 
costs Most aubiects, all grades SpaciaKze 
in writing and LSAT. CaN tMMarte 031(M42- 
9565. 

PRIVATE TUTORING 

SEGOf«0ARy. PRtliAARY LEVEL. AH acade- 
mic subfacls. Plus SAT. At your homa. Afford- 
Me ralaal Cal Admiral Tutoring*31 0-477- 
5685 



UCLA ENGLISH ALUMNI, pro-writer, young, 
supert papers guaranfaad. High school and 
below welcome Jeff 213-653-2240. 



WRniNG TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Stanford University 
graduate Help with English— (or students of 
all ages/levels $15/hr 310-472-8240 or 
310-440-0285 



employment 




7400-8300 





10+YRS EXPERIENCE 

Word Processing. Transcription, Resumes. 
Application Typing. Editing. Notary & More! 
Legal/Medical-Mac/IBM Student Discount 
Near UCLA 310-312-4858 



FANTASTIC! 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNrrY. lyr PfT rntni- 
mum invealment. Can earn you $. $500- 
$2.000Wipo. 24-HR massage. 800-468- 
7262ext.27603. 

MAKE 2000% PROPrr 

SELUNG "HOW-TC information by mail. 
Raprlnl rigMs to 750 Books, reports, maiw- 
als. Fraa infoiMclc. 1-800-466-9222. axt. 
7891.24hrs. 

OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS. Parttime. 
Mtipr nalwork martwUng company. Join out- 
standkig taam. KM wW gat you started. Call 
Roben 9Chaerf-818-990-7401 

WANTED: Two or three friends to form a 
management taam and develop our trade- 
mark line of apparel (initially T-shirts). Cur- 
rent owners have received a strong re- 
sponse in 'early stage' testing These own- 
ers, however, (an attorney&money manager) 
do not have the time to try to advance this 
entrepreneurial opportunity (also we're in 
CfMoage arxt it would fit better to t>egin on tfw 
t)each) Give us an idea of how smart you 
are and whether you have the drive to make 
this succeed Potential for equity is included 
m this package Send replies to Libido 
Sports, 2705 N Bosworth Ave., Chicago, IL 
60614 



Classifieris 
825-2221 



Need extra cash? Sell something! 



ATTORNEY NEEDED TO help recover 
unpaid ir^uranca claim in* a nruijor personal 
injury case. Fee negotiable. 213-874-2569. 



TEACHER ASSTNTS 

PVT, WLA School looking for capable and 
experierwed teacher assistants to work with 
elenwntary level students, M-F. 8AM-1PM. 
Begin 02/23/98. Call: 310-476-2868. Ask for 
Mr Nastri. 



Qr*«t opportuniU** for temporary A 
p*rmafMnt poaiHorw in • variaty of 
I industrte* throughout lA Mtnimum 6 | 
month* efliM •xperianc*. 
Can (310) 207-2S55 
AakforUsaorJul*. 



BARTENDING 

;tudppt Discount for UCLA Sludpn! - 

.M','; ID L:)wcst Tuition 



• Eaniliao-SZOOOiily 

• tsam InwtobsoiNM 
• csnmea mrwiosrin 
JulZwsata 

• irkmiaiak-irsafvunYin 

National 
Bartandors School 

1 (800) 646 • MIXX 




MAKE $1500+ WEEKLY 



working ONLY 4hrs a day. 

No college degree 

or experience needed. 

Not MLM or chain letter. 

For free info call 
M.L ENTERPRISES 
at 1-888-510-4548 



ALPHA PERSONNEL 
ALPHA TEBfPORART 



\i)\v uil<L\(.: 



FulI-tlme/Temp-to-HIre 

Temporary placement 

TOP $$$$ 

• Accounting 

• Admin Asst/ Word Processors 

• Bank Tellers/ Utility Clerks 

• Data Entry Operators 

• Receptionist 

• General Offtee Clerics 

Alpha Personnel (818) 956-3191 

Alpha Temporary (818) 547-3996 

FAX (8 18) 956-3090/ 

(818) 547-5807 




TAKE CARE OF your child in my own apt. 
$40(Vmo 9-5 natfMtnd nurm. WMMDOod 
area. 310-575-3532. 




CARIt^ RESPONSIBLE BABYSITTER 
NEEDED. Help out worWng mom. PkA up 
a/yiHwins (rom B«vefty HMts school. Help 
w/honwwortL Mutt h$m own cer/vald driv- 
ers liowM/r«torwicM. CaN 310-284-8074 

FATHERS HELPER. P/T on Weekends. 
Assist w/girts 6 and 10 Do adivitlM w/lhem. 
Computer Hterate. Must have own car. 310- 
553-7337 

IWIALE PREFERRED to live-in, use own car, 
own apartment. Boy 11 -yr, near beach. 
IBM/PC knowledge. Athletk;, non-smoWng, 
1-yr commitment. 310-822-2228. 

NANNY afternoons and some evenings, 
valid drivers licenae, great references re- 
quired About 32hr8/wk, flexible hQurs. WLA. 
Easy kkls 310-836-8189 

PART-TIME STUDENT to care for 3 chiWren 
in Pacific Palisades Must speak Engllah and 
drive. Approx. 30 hours/week. 800-660> 
5612 

PARTTIME SITTER. Mon, Wed, and/or Fri 
for 2 and half yr-okl/boy. Experience, kx»l 
references, and CDL required. 310-454- 
7490 



Dispia' 
;?06-30l 



Daily Bruin Oatsified 



Thursday, February 19,1998 37 




WORK NOW! 

We're in the business of 
putting prof, people to 
work. Seeking the 
following skills: 
* Reception 
•k Secretaries 
it Word Processors 
WWy pay, flex, hrs, bonus 
and carea" opptys avail. 
Banington Staffing Seivioes 
310-453-3471 



MmMi Mee«led M«w 

No axpaiienca required 

For catalog, printwork, magazlnea, movies 

VKMO and tv oommaiGiale 

Men and Women of ai agas 

,Fi»eConsulMk)n 

CAU MOOa DIVISION 
310.^59.4855 




UCLA Annual F 



$8.1IVHR.tn.wMMis 

nuB nuMM • iSMMwaT irmM m 

<«W.-T1KM. (Mi^Oi. 1 Mh on SM. « Sua. MKnoora) 

ConlKt Caitot Qonttz 
310-794-0277 

1083 Gayley Avenue. 4tti fk>or. Westwood 

wa are able to offer work study 



$1000'S 
POSSIBLE ^„ 
TYPING 

Part-time At home. Toll free. 1-800-218- 
9000 ext T-1650 for listings. 

♦♦RECEPTIONIST** 

F/T OR P/T POSITION AVAILABLE. Energe- 
tc, articulate, professional, nk;e attitude. 
Needed M, W, F or M-F Dental Orthodontk: 
ofWce in WLA and Innne. With excellent sal- 
ary and benefit. Please call: 310-826-7494. 

A LAW FIRM 

WESTWOOD-FlexiWe hours. Learn a tot. 
$7,504^. Good typing skills, computer liter- 
ate, excel experience preferred. Call 310- 
475-0481 Resumes preferred 310-446- 
9962. 

ADMIN ASST 10-20 hrs/wk for data entry, 
filing & ger>eral admin. Fax resume:31 0-247- 
1707/mail POB 5150, Bev HiHs 90209. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT with ac- 
counting and computer skills PT Flexible 
hours PacifV: Palisades. We are national 
ftower shippers. 310-231-0611 

ADMINISTRATIVE. Approximately 22hrs/wk, 
evaninosASaturday mornings Sctieduling, 
a ocoum s rsceivable, phone traffic. Bilingual 
Spanish. $6.50+ Contact Coco: 310-479- 
8353 

ATHLETIC ATTITUDE 

INTEFV4ATIONAL MARKETING FIRM seek- 
ing alrang, motivated irattviduals to fill leader- 
ship arKJ maruigemanl positions Excellent 
pay, FT7PT. 310-348-9900 

BARTENDER TRAINEES NEEDED Earn 
up to $20^., day/0ve classes, 1-2 week 
classes. 310-973-7974. Intematx>nal Bar- 
tender's school. 

BASEBALL! 

ASSIST BASEBALL COACH NEEDED- lor 
9- 11 year okJs, 1-2 hrs 3 days/wk. Must be 
able to throw batting practwe. MikeO310- 
843-9033 

CAD OPEfVKTOR: architectural office has 
P/T poeiiion. Must know auto cad 14 and 
word-processing Fax resume:310-453- 
6i419 or call: 310-453-3335. 2932 Wilshire 
Blvd. Santa Mortice 



CAMPUS JOBS 

UCLA STUDENTS WANTED!! Front 
,de8k/customer service agent at #\e UCLA 
Tiverton House Hotel WORK 15- 
20HRS/WK $7 75/HR+ 32SHIFT DIFFER- 
ENTIAL WE WILL WORK AROUND YOUR 
SCHOOL SCHEDULE. WE ARE OPEN 
24HRS! APPLY AT 900 TIVERTON AVE . LA 
90024 PHONE 310-794-0151. FAX 310- 
794-8503 ^__ 

CAMPUS SAFETY OFFICER Mount St 
Mary's College 3pm- 11pm or 5pm- 1am 
$6/hr to start. 310-541-7775. 

CARETAKER Look after 76yr old man Ex- 
ercise, take to pool. Must drive w/insurance 
P/T. Starling at $9 Fax resume; 310-479- 
2402 




Classifieds 
825-2221 



7800 

HefWMiled 



iifc 




SI'OIMS M\KKI ri\(. 



Earn six figures, get tickets to 

all the hottest sporting events, 

and hang with the pros. If you 

are a graduate, can work under 

pressure, love sports and cold 

calls, you could make your 

team AM 1 1 50 Sports Radio. 

Call Nancy Cole. 

(818)295-6500 . 



^ 




CASTING 

IMMEDIATELY! Extras needed for feature 
films, commercials, and musk: vktoos. Earn 
up to S240 per day! No experience needed 
Work guaranteed! Call today 213-851-6103. 



CLERK/RECEPTIONIST Full-Ome for small 
busy law firm in Beverly Hills. Great hands- 
on experience! $7/hour. Resume: PO Box 
18143 Beverly Hills, CA 90209 Or 
emall:be vhillslaw6earlhlink.net 



COMPUTER SUPPORT Software support 
Win97 NT. Experience w/Access database. 
MS word. Salary negotiable. 20+ hrs/wk 
310-208-2442. Fax resume: 310-208-2621. 



MARKETING INTERN. J. Peterman Compa- 
ny, a national retail/direct mail catatog, is 
tooking for a marketing intern. P/T, pakJ posi- 
tion 15-20hrs/wk Please call Brinae213- 
938-6900. 

MCAT 

BIOLOGICAL and physk;al sciences senrti- 
nars in March, July, and /^gust/1 998 1-800- 
305-4415. huntdOcc.umanitot)a.ca 

MEN-WOMEN AGES18-26 for nude model- 
ing for magazines. Une art and vMaos. Call 
310-289-8941 days 

- 

MODELS WANTED by professtonal photo- 
studk) for upcoming assigrvT>ent Male/Fe- 
male Pro/Non-Pro. Fashion/Commer- 
cial/Theatrk»l. Call for appointment 818- 
986-7933. 

MOVIE EXTRA WORK 

REVOLUTIONARY NEW PROGRAM! Start 
right away! AM types- 18-*-! Fun/Easyl Uo cra- 
zy fees! Program for free medcal! Call- 
24/hrs 213-850-4417. 



NATIONAL PARK 
EMPLOYMENT 

Work in the great outdoors. Forestry, wikf life 
preserve, corKessionaires, firefight- 
ersAmore Competitive wages>t)er>efits. Ask 
us how! 517-324-3110. Ext. n59342 

OFFICE ASSISTANT. Nutrittonal educatton 
helpful. Flexttiie days 16/hrs-wk. $7/hr Fit- 
ness/nutrition firm. Verace. Fax 310-396- 
7980. 

OFFICE ASSISTANT: Part-tinf>e, 12- 
15hrs/week, 3 days a week, flexible, 
$8 50mr. 310-209-3381. 

OFFICE ASSITANT 

Needed for martcaling director PfT or F/T 
Must have knowtadge in MS Word/Excel 
Fax resume to 310-338-3610. 

PART-TIME LEAGUE 
COORDINATOR 

SPORTS-ORIENTATED, fun, reiiabie people 
needed to work at adult sports leagues. Must 
be 21 yrs or okjer Interns also needed. Call 
for interview and wage info. 310-376-0025 



- COMPUTER/TELECOM 



Fast growing internet company kx)kir)g for 
customer servne reps. Part-time 6am- 10am 
M-F, 6pm-midnight M-F, FridayiSaturday 
posititons for mkJnight to 8am or all hours. In- 
cludes phone sales and tech support Com- 
puter experier^e preferred. In Westwood, 
minutes from campus Fluency in French. 
German or Spanish a plus. Fax resume: J. 
Rowlands 310-966-1802 

COVEL COMMONS is hiring responsible 
students for meeting room set-up crew Must 
enjoy customer service. Some lifting 
$6.77/hr 15-20hrs/wk. Call Felicia at 310- 
2 062842 to apply 

CSO PROGRAM 

NOW HIRING Posittons start at $7 18/hr 
with promottons up to $9 47/hr Must be a 
UCLA student with at least one academic 
year remaining and a valid driver's Iteense 
Call 310-825-2148 for details. 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

P/T positions at University Credit Union. Ex- 
cellent pay, hours, and working environment 
at the financial institution serving UCLA. To 
apply, lax resume to 310-477-2566 or on 
web at www ucu org 



DOG LOVERS NEEDED 

Urban dog piaycare & training is now hiring 
for day and evening shifts 310-445-1447. 

ESTABLISHED tXXi WALKING/PET SIT- 
Tif^iG servce is tooking for quality people to 
assist on daily walks Ptoase t>e responsible, 
flexible and love animals! If interested, call 
Tracy 9 213-938-9387 

FILE CLERK NEEDED for Architectural finn 
Organized person for 20-30 hours/wk ^7.00- 
8.50/hr Resumes to Box 1211. 11301 Olym- 
pto Blvd., #121 LA. CA 90064. 

FILE CLERK 

P/T, fast-paced. WLA medcal office Ring 
medk:al records, x-rays, and general duties. 
Fax resume 310-286-2710 attn Kay. 

FUN SUMMER JOBS! Gain valuable experi- 
ence working with children outdoors. We are 
looking for fun. caring. Summer Day Camp 
i staff wfiose summer f>ome is in ttie San Fer- 
nando or Canejo Valley. Ventura, Carr^arillo, 
Malibu. or Simi Valley. Summer salaries 
range from $2,100-3.200+ Call 818-865- 
6263 or email us at CampJobs9aol.com 

GENERAL OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 

Imnnediate positton available Century City 
investment tanking fimn. Must work Tfwrs- 
days&Fridays, 8am-5pm without exception. 
PurKtual, computer literate, responsible, 
dedicated, professional, hard-working, and 
detail-onented Prevtous office experience 
preferred. $8/hr. Fax re8ume:310-788-5572. 
att.:Sherior LHI. 

GIRLS WANTED at exclusive social club in 
. West LA Conversation only. Flexible hours. 
Start tonight, earn top $$$. 310-477-9871. 

HELPER NEEDED to do bookkeeping/office 
work. Must know corr^uters Good organiza- 
Itonal sMRs. Flexible hours. CuWer City. 
$7/hr+. 310-390-1240. 310-558-4255 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC USERS NEEDED $45,000 income po- 
tential CaN: 1-800-513-4343 Ext.B-10105 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. $45,000 income potential. 
Call 1-800-513-4343. Ext B-10105 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. $45,000 income potential. 
Call 1-800-513-4343 Ext B-10105. 

I NEED HELP In my office. Busy phorws, 
Part time. Good pay for the right person 
Language experience pkjs. 310-475-5556. 

INTL. CO. 

NEEDS help immediately RapkHy expand- 
ir>g No experience rtecessary. Full traintng. 
P/T $500-2000. F/T $3000-6000. 310-470- 
6664 

JOIN THE MUSIC MARKETING TEAM Cut- 
tir>g-edge company tooking for student work- 
ers wfK) know tfie LA musk: 8cer>e arid sur- 
rourxJir>gs like tfie back of their hand* If you 
have wheels, are rrwtivated, and like getting 
tree CD's, concert ttokets, and pronK) stuff. 
fax your resume to 212-966-7508 or email to 
mdcOdti.net 

KAPLAN 

SALES-Smart. amt>itious. energetic people 
for our Educattonal Sales Department. B/A, 
1-year experiery:e in sales/marketing, serv- 
ice-onented. enthnved in fast-paced workir>g 
environment. Fax cover and resume attn: 
DW 310 -209-2025. 

LASER TECHNICIAN for laser hair removal 
company in BH. RN or PA (or soon-to-be 
graduate) Friendly, detail-oriented, will train 
$18-$25/hr 310-247-0999 

LE BEACH CLUB 

AMERICA'S FAVORITE TANNING resort is 
expanding&has limited#of FT openings for 
rTK>tivated. outgoing, tanning/sales consult- 
ants. Pos. are limited so call now&join LE 
BEACH CLUB, the Very Best Contact Carol 
310-704-8834. 

LIVE IN WANTED to assist with daily activi- 
ties for a healthy 86-yr/okj widow. Santa Mo- 
nica area. Must have car. 310-587-9244. 

ATTRACTIVE, sell motivated, women need 
ed for lingerie modeling No nudiiy Excel 
lent compensation!' Will not interfere w/stuO 
•es Christine#8l8-S46 8855Exl3 



PERMANENT F/T FILE CLERK-$8/hr Mon- 
Fri. 9am-5:30pm Small immigration law firm 
in Century City Computer literate, good 
phorfe skills, file, phones. Positton includes 
all other job related duties. Begins ASAP. 
310-553-6600 or Jax-310-553-2616 

PERSONAL TRAINER Phys-ed major— pri- 
vate training opportunity 5 days/week. M-F. 
6am start. $500/month. Fax information: 
310-476-7976. 

PRODUCTION COMPANY just completed 
first film seeks scripts for next feature pro- 
ject. Contact Alex GaynerO 31 0-396-3828 or 
Steve Adelson ©31 0-306-2852 for nrrore in- 
formation. 

PRODUCTION CREW needed. Somewhat 
experienced for ambitious short film: 
wardrobe, props. AD, editor, make-up, and 
more. Send Resume 25852 McBean 
Parkway «1 83 Valencia. Ca 9\355 

PT DRIVERS/WAITERS 
WANTED 

FLEXIBLE HRS. GREAT work/people. Driv- 
ers/waiters wanted- Pizza Hut. Contact 
l^than: 310-206-0900. 

PT GENERAL OFFICE 

OFFICE/MAILCLERK-maihng. copying, fil- 
ing, phones, for large syrwgogue. $7.0O/hr. 
Permanent/Parttime 1-5pm H4on-Fri. 
Please fax resume to Wilshire Blvd. Temple 
213-388-2595 or call Yvette 213-388-2401 



PT OFFICE ASSISTANT wanted by family- 
run real estate management company. Must 
be extremely organized, computer liter- 
ate&reliable Great working environ- 
nr>ent/fl€xible hours $8/fTOur 213-850-5726 

RECEPTIONIST 

WEEKEND positton with Law Firm 9am- 
6pm Sat-Sun Bilii>gual Spanish Receptton, 
data entry, filing. CorDputer literate $15/hr 
,Fax resume 213-658-6041 

RECEPTIONIST Experienced, needed for 
r>ew salon in Westwood F/T Please call 
310-208-7531. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANT$10/HR. CaH 512- 
472-7225 

RETAIL SALES. Retail sales books. PT. 
CNMren book knowledge req. WLA. 310- 
559-2665. 

STUDIO REPS NEED?D. $7-$15/hr ♦too- 
nuses P/T. No expenerKe needed Working 
w/other students Great P/T / F/T work 213- 
882-6844. 

SUIWIMER CAMP JOBS Decathton Sports 
Club Pato Alto. CA SeS-SSO/day 6/22-8/14 
650-365-8638 

SURROGACY Professional couple seeks 
woman to f>elp them have a chito through 
surrogacy. $20,000 800-450 5343 

TEACHERS NEEDED 

to teach kkls computers, ntath. and science 
classes ASAP Hours 2-5pm Experience 
wori(ing with kkls preferred Great pay All 
appltoants fax resunr>e to: 310-445-5628 

WAITER/WAITRESS/CASHIER wanted at a 
Japarwse cafe in WLA Must be fluent in 
both English arxl Japanese CaU 310-477- 
9871 

WANT TO HAVE FUN ©WORK? Responsi- 
ble. entfHJSiastic arxl hardworking Phys Ed. 
ECE. child development majors apply. Kkls 
gym Holly 818-343-1120. 

WANTED ASIAN 

PT WORK MASSAGE Great pay, flex hrs. 
Will work around your school scfiedule 818- 
344-1294 

WEB SITE DESIGNERS 

Full and part time. $15/f>our+ HTML and 
graphic design High-end clients, great ex- 
perience, leading design studio Apolto Inter- 
active 310-393 5373 

WE'RE SEEKII^ INDIVIDUALS to provkte 

support to the devetoprrientally disat>led Call 
Dwight Islanbulian at 818-361-6400 ext 129 



PR INTERNSHIP 

Hollywood Madison group, a PR agency 
specializing in celebrity endorsements, is of- 
fering a non-pakl 3mo internship Require- 
ments: sophomore status. MAC proficient. 
lS-20hr8/wk. Fax resume: 213-951-1750 



Let over 56.000 readers know it's your friend's birthday 




INT'L BUSINESS AND 
MARKETING 

EXPERIENCEALEARN ALL aspects of infl 
business, marketing, export, product devel- 
opment. operation&mari<et research UniNet 
Santa Monica seeks intern for special pro- 
jects. PT, flexible hrs, possibility ol interna- 
tional travel If you are motivated, organized, 
dependable, fluency in Japanese/German/ 
or Italian. Fax your resume© 31 0-396-3 196 
attn: Internship or call 310-396-8596. 

OFFICE/PRODUCTION ASSISTANT. 

Record Lat>el/Artist Management company 
representing major artists Phone/comput- 
er/secretanal experience preferred. Ctose to 
campus. Urtpato but great experierKe. Flexi- 
ble hours. 818-784-7782, 

INTERNS WANTED! 

HI-RISE BUILDING PROJECT m Marina 
Del .Ray now hiring paid interns for training 
in purchasing, project management, civii en-- 
gineering quality control and interior rtesign 
F;ix one page letter/resume to Polans 
CCAD 310-301 0384 






lorltaBt 



1-BDRM$598ANDUP 
WLA/CHEV.HILLS 

QUIET, DELUXE, CLEAN, security-building 
Gated-parking Refngeralor. stove. Carpet, 
laundry room. No pets 310-838-6423. Call 
Bob 

1BD-$675/SGL-$600 

WLA GARDEN COURTYARD Quiet, ap- 
pliances, blinds, etc Blue Bus. I.Smi to cam- 
pus Ava now 310-477-0725, 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ. 1&2-BEDROOMS 
UPPER4LOWER $710- $925 ASK FOR 
BONUS SOME W/HARDWOOO FLOORS. 
BALCONY ONLY 1/2 BLOCK TO PICO 
BUS. 310-839-6294. 



GENUINE UCLA 
SPECIALS 

Singles from S750-775 



UTILITiES INCLUDED 



:• • PALMS • "s 

2B0.2BA, 

CUSTOM TOWNHOUSE, FIREPLACE. 

BALCONY. GATED GARAGE. 

ALARM IN UNIT 

• 3614 PARIS $1046 

(310) 837-0906 

480. aBA, 

LOFT. CUSTOM TOWNHOIyiE. RflEPLACE. 

GATED GARAGE. ALAfflM IN UNIT 

• 3640 WESTWOOD BLVD. $1795 

(310)391-1076 

* MAR VISTA * 

460. 4eA 

GATED GARAGE . ALARM IN UNIT 

t 39(4 BesNWMnSL $179$ 

2B0.2BA 2-STORY 

CUSTOM TOWNHOUSE, RREPLACE. 

BALCONY. GATED GARAGE. 

ALARM IN Ul^ 

• 11748 Courtteign Dr.$925 • 

. (310)391-1076 _ 

■■ C)p«n HouM Mon St,. 10-5 — 




Display 



I t 



t^ 



■W" 



38 Thursday, February 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin Classified 




liiaiiiiiMlHi 



Maiii 



forRmt 




SSi^siiMXiuiM: 



BRENTWOOD $625 A1 studio-apt W/pri- 
vate entrance, serious tenant only N/S, N/P 
Walk to village References necessary 310- 
472-1869 

BRENTWOOD 

$725. Studio N. of Witshire. Spacious, sun- 
ny-upper witfi separate Icrtctien, living room. 
Wall<-in closet Refrigerator, stove, air-condi- 
tioner. Close to UCLA. 11921 Gosfien Ave , 
#7 310-571-0293 

BRENTWOOD- 1+1 North of Sunset. 1 mile 
from UCLA Fireplace, pool, gated parking, 
and laundry in quiet and private security 
buiUing. $1195/mo. 8310-476-5806. 

MAR VISTA $1,795. 4-bdrm/4-bath 3-level 
townfiouse. Fireplace, gated garage, unit 
alarm, sundeck. Open Mon-Sat, 3954 
Beethoven st 310-391-1076. 

MAR VISTA $925 2-bdrm/2-l)a. 2-stOfy cus- 
tom toMmhomes. Fireplace, gated garage, 
unit alarm. Open Morxlay-Saturday 10-5. 
11748 Courtteigh Dr 310-391-1076. 

OVERLAND NATIONAL. Cozy, 2bdmV1ba 
apartment Quiet buiMtng. hardwood floors, 
refrigerator and stove. $750/itk> $700 secur- 
ity deposit. 310-458-7726. 

PALMS SINGLE. Pleasant, quiet buiUding, 
pool, frig, stove. $525. 310-836-1424. 

PALMS. $1045. 2-bed-2-bath. 2-story town- 
homes. Fireplace, gated garage, unit alarm, 
open 7days. 3614 Fans Drive. 310-391-1076 
or 310-837-0906 Manager. 

PALMS. $1150. Large 1-bdrm, 1 5-bath Loft. 
fireplace, balcony, private sundeck. A/C. new 
carpet/Vyl-Near shops/fwy. 310-836-6007. 



PALMS. $1795. 4-bd+toft, 3-ba. 3-Wvel town- 
house Fireplace, gated garage, unit alarm, 
sundeck. O^n Mon-Sat. 10-5. 3640 
Weshfvood Blvd. 310-391-1076. 

PALMS. $595. 1-t)edroom, entry system, 
very quiet, all appliances. Convenient to 
cannpus. Security deposit $100. A/C, laundry 
310-837-7061. 

PALMS. Ibdrm/lba. Carpet, newly painted 
Utilities included. Icar parking. Center court- 
yard. $575 310-558-1782 or 310-839-8105 

PALMS. Single apt from $465-$495. 1-bdrm, 
$595. Stove, refrigerator and 1 -month free 
w/year lease. $300deposit 310-837-1502 
leave message. 

SANTA MONICA. BRENTWOOD, WEST- 
WOOD and the WESTSIDE. Over 1,000 
properties each week. LOW FEE. Westside 
Rental Connection. 310-395-RENT. 
www.we6tsiderentals.com 



WALK TO UCLA 

Westwood. 2txlrm with view, washer/dryer 
in unit, 2/bth Mk:rowave oven, refrigerator, 
fireplace, very ttright, 21-sq.foot Jacuzzi 
310- 475-0807 

WESTWOOD ADJACENT $1300 Condo 2- 
bdrm/2-bath. Bateony, appliances, pool, 
quiet locked building/garage. 310-553-6662. 

WESTWOOD LARGE studio apartment with 
bakx>ny. AH appliances. Secured parking. 
Walk to UCLA. $690. 310-206-4934. 

WESTWOOD, 1440 Veteran. Studio w/full 
kitchen, bed, desk. Secured buikjing&partc- 
ing. Utilities paid. Pool, spa, laundry, 
rec.room $795/nf». 818-222-1909 or 310- 
478-7570. 



tOf UmiI 



WESTWOOD- WALK TO UCLA- Small 
bachelor, utilities paid plus bathroom, hot- 
plate-f small fridge. $400. WLA Large singles 
partying, $550 310-476-8090. 

WESTWOOD. 1 MIN from UCLA. Single. 
$750. Gated complex. Pod. Laundry. All util- 
ities paid. 1 yr lease 310-824-1830 

WESTWOOD. 2bdrm/1bth w/oven 
range&dlshwasher Gated building, 2-car 
tandem parking. Available now. 1675 Man- 
ning $1000/mo. 310-476-6763. 

WESTWOOD. CATHEDRAL CEILINGS, fire- 
place, 2-txlrm/2-t>ath, 2nd story, bak:ony, 
new fridge, stove, idishwasher. hiewly paint- 
ed Walk to UCLA $1,300. 310-824-0523. 

WESTWOOD. Chamning, elegant, quiet 2- 
bdrm, 1. 5-bath. Dining room, hardwood 
ftoors, washer/dryer, stove/Trig, remote ga- 
rage. Gardener. Like home! $1400. 310-440- 
2050. 

WESTWOOD. Extra large l-bdmi apart- 
rrtertt. Upper-unit, quiet tHjikUng, hardwood 
ftoors. New appliances, parking, 
washer/dryer. Walking distance to UCLA. 
$1,100/nK>. 310-208-2606 




Mf nMn Hooiii Tor mill 



BRENTWOOD- 2Bd-t-2Ba Condo Gated 
parking, a/c. washer/dryer, refrigerator, 
stove, microwave, walk-in closet, fireplace 
$1495 310-446-1347. 

WLA $950. TOWNHSE/APT 2bdrm/1.5ba 
2 parkings AC, dishwasher, fireplace, stove, 
fridge 1826 Bundy Dr. 310-450-8414. 

WLA. 2-bdrm/2-bath. Huge . living 
room-fwlndow view. AC, security tHjIkling, 
washer/dryer. Inside parking. Rot)inson/Pico. 
15min driving. Bus6s. $925/mo. 310-625- 
9625, Hm 310-289-8281 



ROOM/BOARD&SMALL 
SALARY 

Busy executive in Glendale needs help 
w/household duties, lite cooking, cleaning, 
shopping. Occasional help w/2 young child- 
ren Quality Individuals ONLY. Good driving 
record&references a must! 818-249-6105 or 
816-241-7383 ask for Peter Blacksberg. 





WEST DALE. Near schools, shopping, 1844 
square feet 3-bdrm/2-bath, den, new car- 
pet/hardwood ftoors. 2-fireplaces. By owner 
$360,000. 310-206-6028/473-8191. 





FORtMER UCLA TENNIS PLAYER seeks 
guestfXMise with court. WHt pay rent and or 
exchartge lessons. Have references. 310- 
585-6073 

GRAO STUDENT WHO COMMUTES from 
Bay Area seeks quiet room M-W evenings 
only. Contact Robert at rdeesOucIa edu or 
650-813-0507. 



MAR VISTA, $62S/nr)onth. Ask about free 
rent. Attractive, fumisfwd 1-bdrm. Large, 
pool, patto, t>art>ecue area. Ouiet-buikling. 
3748 Ingtowood Blvd. 310-398-8579. 

WLA-$590/mo. Ask aix>ut free rent. Attrac- 
tive furnished-singles. Near UCLA/VA. Meal 
for students Suitable tor two. Defiftite must 
see! 1525 Savirtelle Bl 310-477-4832. 




FREE RM&BOARD 

(OWN BA/PHONE) in exchange for 20hrs wk 
in beautiful WLA hm. Duties include hse 
cleaning, laundry&babysitting. 310-837- 
8807. 



BEL AIR. 7-min from UCLA. Priv. entrance, 
room, bath, kitchen/laundry priveleges, utili- 
ties IrKluded. Partcing Grad-student pre- 
(•ffed. $600/mo. 310-476-4901. 



BEVERLY HILLS, furnished private rooms in 
large house w/grad students, kitchen privi- 
legM, pool, washer/dryer, utilities/included. 
N«ed car, $47S/$575 (huge separate rear 
room). Leave message. Abbey 310-275- 
3831or 818-783-5151. 

BEVERLYWOOD. Rmmate wanted, fem. 
pref. 15min from school. Own rm/ba. 
$525/nr>o-fshared utilties. Very quiet. 310- 
559-1935. 



BRENTWOOD. Move-In ASAP Share 3- 
txlrm apartment till April 3/possiblitly for 
longer. Master bedroom/own bathroom, 
partong, no-deposit. $675 obo. Call. 31 (h 
820-0424. .*i' 



BRENTWOOD. Share 2-bdmV2-bath. Pri- 
vate room and bath, f^lear shops. Fireplace, 
pati9. Charming. Female. N/S, No pet. 
$50ai'mo. 310-476-2105 




THURSDAY EVENING 



BROADCAST STATIONS 



A - Century Cable B - Channel Name C : Brum Cablevision 



FEB. 19. 1998 



11 



13 



34 



CD 



X 



s 






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28 



11 



13 



25 



K 



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HUls, 90210 (In 
StereofX: 



Science 
Guy 



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Cook- 
Caprial 



101 



Boy MMts 

WeridOB SinaAtE 



PL ■LiOLM-i _i 

ricDonsfy 



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ndd Lake Frienc^ caught 
in the middle 



f rt w ef Impacto 



SI 



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Businaas 



3} 



JudoB Judy 

(In Stereo) 



UwprovB. 



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NBCNMn 



Fresh 
Prfaice 



Efli 
Toniyyl 



Extra (In 
Stereo 



Fresh 



(In 

>)« 



NawshourWilhJim 
LahrarlE 



ABCWM 



Stereo) 



TV^. 



SMipsons 

(In Stereo) 



(In Slereo) 
Mad About 
Vou(E 






Jsopartty! 



VidM>« 



Iwipfove. 



FrasiarOn 
Stereo) 



S 



Winter Oly. 



SaMaldJn 
Stereo) g 



Ufewid 
rimes 



Wlwel of 
Fortune Kl 



LAPO:LMe 
on ttw BmI 



Simpsons 

GE 



BASIC CABLE STATIONS 



44 



33 



54 



39 



43 



57 



75 



56 



58 



12 



65 



76 



26 



44 



42 



39 



41 



40 



64 



71 



38 



Biograpliy: Jayne 

Mar\sfield 



New Explofers 



*♦* "A Sutrmer Place" (1959) Richard Egan Young 
love ar>d an old romanee mrealen lo ruin families 



*** "Chuck Berry Han Haih Rock nRotrnmi) A 
tribute to rock 'n' rol pionecf Chtx* Berry. 'PG' 



Wodd Today n 



4:00) "Adventures of 
9uck3roo Bandar 



Prime Time Juetloe 



Larry King Uve X 



Canned 



LaiH^ 



Codwan A Company 



Prima Time Public Affairs 



Esmaralda' 



Unexplained (R) 



Olympic WMsr Games Figure skating preview; wmmen's slakxn; speed skating: 
nordic combwed skiing. Bi 



Friends (R) 



3rdRod(- 
Sun 



SeinfaMJIn 
Slereo) B 



Veronica's 
Cloeetac 



* * ' : yourtg Gur\s //" ( 1 990) Emilio Estevez. BiHy Ihe 
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Daily Bniin Sports 



Th(nday,Miroaryt9,199l 39 



SHAPIRO 



From page 48 

lective conndence in oiir team is 
damaged since they didn't just 
cOme up short of the gold, but tliey 
tripped on their proverbial skate 
laces on the way to the medal stand 
and fell flat on their faces, out of the 
medals. 

So, it may look grim for our gap- 
toothed squad, but let's try an d 
remember the good things. 

Who can forget that heartstop- 
ping victory over Belarus (popula- 
tion 19) in the round robin competi- 



tion? 

How will anyone ever lose that 
indelible image of our sturdy front 
line of John LeClair and Brett Hull 
trying really, really hard to score 
goals? 

On the flip side, what did the 
women really accomplish anyway? 
(Before we discuss this, let's agree 
not to consider the fact that they 
won the first women's hockey gold 
medal, beating Team Canada twice 
in the process.) 

Sure, they've become the media 
darlings of the games, shown that 
women's hockey is really fun and 
exciting to watch and lived up to 



every expectation that a nation 
could put on them. 



Each team would be 

acting just like the 

other did when the 

games began. 



But, hey, what have you done for 
me lately? 
The men would come into the 



game with something to prove, and 
the women would be overconfident, 
cocky, and ill-prepared. In essence, 
each team would be acting just like 
the other did when the games . 
began, thus each would suffer a sim- 
ilar fate. 

There is only one thing that we 
would have to be very careful of - 
that would be keeping the trash- 
talking to a minimum, because 
some of the men's feelings might 
get hurt. . 

I only have the b^st Interests of 
the testosterone-based life forms in 
mind, because the estrogen variety 
showed that absolutely nothing is 



sacred or off-limits to their witti- 
cisms when an unidentified U.S. 
player insulted a Canadian player's 
deceased father during the two 
teams' initial meeting. 

Could you imagine Chris Chelios 
captaining the American men into 
this game and losing his cool when 
Cammi Granato insulted his poor 
dental work, then whupped him 
upside the head with her stick? 

Hey, I would pay to see that hap- 
pen. 

Shapiro is a Daily Bruin staff writei 
and columnist. E-mail responses to 
mshapiro^media.ucla.edu >^ 



► 



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^ i: . 



40 Thursday, Fcbnury 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin Sports 



FEATURE 



From page 47 

have stepped up, blazing through 
opponents' bats, collecting an ERA 
under one. 

The oldtist^, pitcher is a transfer 
student, Erin .Weiler, who has a 3-0 
record. Trying; to fill the shoes of a 
pitching staff last year that won 49 
games, had 1.60 ERA, and compiled 
403 strikeouts, and are all no longer 
on the team has been hard. 

"It has been great because there 
has been no special expectations put 
on us but last year's (pitchers) are 



always at the back of our minds," 
Weiler said. 

Helping to relieve the pressure off 
of Weiler has been one of the biggest 
surprises in the camp, Stephanie 
Swenson. Swenson is a true fresh- 
man from San Clemente who was 
not even recruited by UCLA and 
signed late with the Bruins. Swenson 
is on an amazing tear, racking up 1 1 
strikeouts and three wins. 

"We used to have a lot of stoppers 
who would come in and throw heat 
but now we don't have that ... Gayer 
and Swenson are our hardest throw- 
ers," Inouye-Perez said. "Swenson 
has been our biggest surprise 



because coming out of high school 
we didn't know what she was about 
but she has stepped up and been real 
effective." 

With new pitchers, strong defense 
is a must in order for the Bruins to 
win. At third base, Jenny Gardner 
has impressed, gobbling up every 
thing hit her way. 

it has been..*-dream since I was 
playing softball at the age of six to 
come in and play at UCLA," 
Gardner, who is batting respectably 
at .263, said. 

Her dream has come true as she 
has become one of the consistent 
new performers to the team. 



Filling in last year's shoes the 
rookies have come out playing with 
a- lot of confidence and that has 
heli>ed them lead by example. 

"I didn't expect confidence in a 
lot of the new girls," Laurie Fritz, 
senior lead-off hitter, said. "But they 
have shown confidence and confi- 
dence is everything in this game." 

One player with a basepath full of 
Confidence is left fielder Casey 
Hirawiwa, who has jumped all over 
opposing pitchers for a .308 batting 
average. Playing stellar defense. 
Hirawiwa is the ultimate example of 
a Bruin. 

"Hirawiwa swings a good stick ... 



She is a little thing but hits the bajl 
hard consistently," Inouye-Perez 
said. "She has a terrific gameface. 
and plays solid defense even though 
she is an infielder converted to the 
outfield." 

The new players have enough 
confidence in their game to help lead 
the way for a great Bruin team. 
Through the sharing of the leader- 
ship role, the team has meshed and 
has relieved the pressure of coming 
into UCLA and having to make an 
impact. 

"Geese fly in a V shape and the 

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INVITATION FROM THE HARVARD- 
RADCLIFFE CLUB OF SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA TO HARVARD- 
RADCLIFFE ALUMNI AT UCLA TO 
MEET CHANCELLOR CARNESALE 

On Thursday, February 2^, at 6 P.M. the 
Harvdrd-Radcliffe Club of Southern 
Ca]iforry\a will host a smaW buffet dinner- 
reception of welcome for Chancellor 
Albert Ccirnescile at the UCLA Faculty 
Center. Chancellor Carnesale served as 
Dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of 
Government and as Provost of harvard 
University. 

The cost of the event, which includes hors 
d'oeuvres and dinner, is $22 for Club 
members and their guests, $26 for non- 
members. (Alumni may join the Yiarvard- 
Radcliffe Club and receive the lower rate). 
If you. would like to attend please mail 
your checks payable to the Harvard- 
RadcHffc Club of Southern California to 
Myron Kayton before February 22 at P.O. 
Box 802, Santa Monica, CA 90406. 
Further information from (310) 393-1819. 



FEATURE 



From page 40 

head goose absprbs 72 perfeni of 
the wind. When the goose gets 
tired it goes to the back of the for- 
mation," Gayer, who has one vic- 
tory under her belt, said about 
sharing the leadership. 

"When the head goose goes to 
the back a new goose steps up and 
it is a continuous action to keep 
the head geese from wearing out." 

The leadership is transferred 
from game to game, from outspo- 
ken inspirational s leaders to 



extreme Laurie Fritz hustle. This 
has cased the tension this year and 
has made the softball diamond fun 
again for the Bruins. 

With a lot of heart and great 

team chemistry the team has put 
behind it the armageddon created 
by last year's fiasco. 

The returners and rookies have 
come together to surprise the soft- 
ball world. 

The Bruins may have to hiber- 
nate from postseason this year but 
with such a talented squad earning 
experience this year, the Bruins 
will be ready to party "like it's 
1999." 



PROBATION 



From page 47 

Series," Laurie Fritz, second basemen, 
said, "and they told us "you guys cant 
go' ... we were working four to five 
hours a day then doing weights ... It 
didn't seem fair!" 

Immediately, the high rays of happi- 
ness on Laston were dampened by the 
stormy truth. Heading into their final 
games against Arizona State before the 
seedings, UCLA said they wouldn't 
appeal. But they did. 

The appeal allowed UCLA to be 
seeded and the NCAA granted the 



Bruins the chance to play in the post 
season but it would cost them this year. 

"The probation was not the issue it 
was the post season," assistant coach 
Kelly Inouye-Perez said. "It was disap- 
pointing because it affected the seniors 
last year ... Now it affects the current 
seniors who just want to play and finish 
up strong." 

Not only are the Bruins on proba- 
tion, but many outstandmg players 
have red-shirted or transferred. The 
biggest loss to the club may have been 
freshman phenom, Christa Williams, 
who blew away opponents on the pitch- 
ing mound. Williams transferred to the 
University of Texas, taking with her a 



21-8 record and 218 strikeouts. 

Another integral part of the Bruin 
pitching staff who was affected by the 
probation is Courtney Dale, who is red- 
shirting this year. Dale was 7-1 in 17 
appearances, but more importantly 
batted .330, giving the Bruins an 
instant spark in the line-up. 
Redshirting with Dale are National 
Team members Julie Adams, Christie 
Ambrosi and Stacey Nuveman. 

The probation depleted the team of 
perennial all-stars knd an unstoppable 
pitching staff. With a crop of freshmen 
and transfers, the four seniors will have 
to step up and melt away all those shad- 
ows away that are haunting Easton. 




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42 Thursday. WKuary 19. 1998 



Daily Bruin Sports 



M. BASKETBALL 

From page 4S , , «_. ^ ^ 



down by four with 1:12 remaining 
after Trojan guard Kevin Augustine 
hit a three-pointer from the right side. 
Bailey would connect on two free 
throws with 1 :04 left in regulation. 

Then it was the Bruin defense's 
turn. Augustine drove into the lane, 
but J.R. Henderson deflected the 
shot. UCLA's Earl Watson would 
come up with the ball and missed his 
ensuing shot attempt, but Bailey was 
there for the putback that would send 



the game into overtime. 

"(Taking charge) is something that 
automatically comes, it's nothing I 
really think about," said Bailey, who^ 
scored 17 points. "1 think 1 needed a 
game like this, especially since against 
Stanford 1 was doing the same thing 
and 1 fell a little short when I slipped. 
It felt like I just let the team down a lit- 
tle bit and to come back and get a win 
like this, 1 think it does a lot for the 
team." 

Despite not having Baron Davis in 
the line-up because he fouled out with 
2: 10 left in regulation, UCLA would 
dominate the extra five minutes. 



Henderson, who had a team-high 20 
points, scored seven of the Bruins' 12 
overtime points. 
— ^ "'Bruins in ruins,' that'sa bunch of 
bull," Henderson said. "We're just a 
team that is trying to get better and 
trying to improve." 

In its first game since Jelani 
McCoy's resignation, the Bruin 
bench came through for UCLA. 
Freshman Rico Hines had his second 
straight impressive performance with 
seven points and six rebounds, includ- 
ing one board near the end of over- 
time that helped seal the Trojan (7-17, 
3-1 1) casket. 




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VOLLEYBALL 



From page 48 

Barbara nine times throughout the 
night. Sophomore setter Brandon 
Taliaferro did the most damage a?Hfe 
blasted a match-high five aces. 
However, the Gauchos did out-dig the 
Bruins 43 to 37. 

"Santa Barbara made some fantas- 
tic digs out there tonight," Scales said. 
"The problem was that we put the big 
block in their face and they hit the ball 
out." 

In game one, the Bruins never 
trailed and held leads of seven, eight. 



and ninfc points. The Bruins set the tone 
for the night as UCLA easily took 
game one. 

Although Santa Barbara had an 
early lead in game two, the Bruins took 
advantage of five straight hitting errors 
to go up 8-5. The Gauchos would close 
the gap to two at 1 1-9 but a kill by Fred 
Robins and three more hitting errors by 
the Gauchos would end the game. The 
Bruins dominated game three and 
effectively eliminated the Gauchos. 

"We got beaten by a better team 
obviously." UCSB head coach Ken 
Preston said. "I thought we passed the 
ball really well. We just didn't execute 
on the offensive end of it." 



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Daily Bruin Sports 



ThurwJay, Febniary 19, 1998' 43 



RECAP 



Frontpage 47 

home run of her career to go into all- 
time first place on the career home 
nin chart. 

Wuest, however, is modest about 
the team's success so far this season. 

"(The team) has done fine so far. 
It's not Pao-IO yet; we're not playing 
all the time, so it's hard to tell how the 
team will do this year," says Wuest, a 
senior leader on the team. 

For the Bruins' home opener 
against Loyola Marymount, Mother 
Nature tried to stop UCLA with yet 



another obstacle, dumping rain on 
the contest. Despite being soaking 
wet, the Bruins played error-free 
ball, in contrast to the Lions' five 
errors over both games. 

Again, UCLA rode the arms of 
Swenson and Weiler, who notched a • 
complete game victory and seven 
scoreless innings, respectively. The 
fabulous freshmen have given up an 
astounding two earned runs over 43 
innings of work so far. 

The poise and demeanor of the 
two rookies has impressed their 
teammates. Fritz said, "I didn't 
expect so much confidence in a lot of 
the new girls. They've done really 



I'm impressed with ... 

how flexible we can be 

as a team." 



Sue'Enquist 

Head coach 



well." 

Enquist agrees that the team as a 
whole has exhibited exceptional con- 
fidence, and backed it up with their 
play. 



"Our senior leadership is coming 
forward, our pitching is coming 
through really well ... I'm impressed 
with our work ethic, how well we can 
rebound, and how Hexible we can be 
as a team based on our opponent." 

Next up for the as-yet untested 
Softball team is the Gampbell/Cartier 
Classic, a tournament taking place in 
San Diego this weekend. The Bruins 
will kick off the Classic against 
Stanford today, in a non-conference 
game that will be an omen for how 
well UCLA will fare in Pac-10 play. 
The tournament will also include 
matches against Long Beach State, 
University of Michigan, Louisiana 



State and San Diego State. 

"This weekend we play a lot of 
teams that are excellent, that are 
ranked in the top 10. It should be a 
good test and a good barometer of 
where we are," says Coach Enquist. 

"We just have to have solid 
defense, get timely hitting, and play- 
our-guts-out style of play." 

No matter the trials and tribula- 
tions to come for the Bruins in the 
days ahead, one has to believe that 
they'll get throDgh them, if their 
showing so far is any indication. 

As Laurie Fritz puts it, "We have a 
lot of heart, which will take us a long 
way." 



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Daily Bruin Sports 



Daily Bruin Sports 



Thursday February 19, 1998 45 






r:: 









DAVIS-WATSON 

From page 48 

would be struggling right now, obvi- 
ously, without the heart and play and 
hustleof those two." 

If it weren't for Baron Davis and 
Earl Watson, the I2th-ranked Bruins 
would have at least one extra mark 
in the loss column. UCLA scraped 
by with the 68-66 victory over 
Oregon at Pauley Pavilion thanks in 
part to the dyramic duo's last sec- 
ond heroics. 

With 25 seconds left, the score 
tied and the Ducks with the ball. 
Watson used his quick hands to steal 
the ball and DaVrs finished it off with 
the game-winning layup. 



The starting freshmen's 
connpatibjiity on the 

court has ... helped the 
Bruins achieve their 
20-5 record. . 



,.f- 



But UCLA's Batman and Robin 
didn't just save the day on that one 
occasion. The starting freshmen's 
compatibility on the court has not 
only produced spectacular plays that 
have awed many a Pauley crowd, but 
it has helped the Bruins achieve their 
20-5 record. 

And the Baron and the Earl will 
help lead UCLA against No. 2 Duke 
on Sunday. 

"I think that they have great 
chemistry," fellow freshman Rico 
Hines said. "They know how to find 
each other in the open court and 
Earl knows how to pitch the ball 
ahead and create ofT the fast break 



and Baron is a great finder and a 
great fihisher." 

UCLA head coach Steve Lavin 
said: "They remind me of Hope and 
Crosby, Ed McMahon-Johnny 
Carson, Fred Astaire-Gene Kelly. 
They just have a special feel for one 
another and there's a special chem- 
istry that exists between the two of 
them." 

That special chemistry on the 
court has its basic roots off the 
court. Davis and Watson aren't just 
a great pair on the hardwood. They 
watch movies together, they play 
video games together, they take 
classes together, they rap together, 
they live together. 

"We go everywhere together," 
Davis said. "We basically do every- 
thing together." 

"You see him," Watson said,"you 
see me." 

Kind of surprising when you 
think about their personalities. 
Watson is the quiet, reserved one 
and Davis, as Hines put it, 'talks 
enough for everybody." But for 
whatever -reason, they are best 
friends and they are inseparable. 

"I guess it's like opposites 
attract," Davis said. "But we just get 
along, we both share the sanie type 
of personal qualities." ^ 

Though they come from states 
that are miles and miles apart, their 
friendship started long before the 
first day of fall classes. 

As two of the nation's top prep 
players, Davis and Watson would 
run up phone bills talking about life 
and the recruiting process they were 
going through. But their recruiting 
experiences were, just about as far 
apart as their hometowns. 

Watson's college choice garnered 
a lot of interest in Kansas, while 
Davis' decision gained headlines 
across the nation. While Watson was 
chided for being a Benedict Arnold, 
Davis was the focus of NCAA inves- 




BaronDavb 




Hometown: Los Angeles 


■PTI 


High School: Santa 
Monka Crossroads 


1 Wrt; 4J 


Hei9bt:6-11/2 


1 yfc 53 


Wet9iit20S 


fgm^l 



SoMict UCUSiortitolB 




XX BAIWY/Daily Brutn 

tigations. 

When Watson signed with 
UCLA, the 6-foot guard disappoint- 
ed the people of the Sunfiower State 
who were hoping that the 
Washington High School senior 
from Kansas City would play for 
Kansas. 

"One day me and my teacher got 
into it in class about Kansas and 
UCLA," Watson said. "We were 
going at it, he got mad at me, he just 
left the room and everybody started 
laughing. He was a Kansas alumni. 
That was my whole school - Kansas 
alumni. So I was labeled as a traitor, 
but it was all in good nature and in 
good fun. 

"All it did was make me work 
harder, they asked for it." 

Meanwhile, the attention that Los 
Angeles native Davis received 
almost made him give up on college 



Hometown: Kansas City.KS 
High SdMol: Washington 
Height: 6-0 
Weight: 183 

Soww UCUSnombfc 




XX BARRY/Daily Bruin 

: V ■ " - - ■ "' 

_- ' . , . _ i 

basketball altogether. 

Controversy engulfed the recruit- 
ment of the nation's top prep point 
guard. Former UCLA head coach 
Jim Harrick was interrogated by the 
NCAA about the circumstances sur- 
rounding the sale of a used car that 
belonged to Harrick 's son to Lisa 
Hodoh, Davis' sister, plastering the 
then- 17 year old's name all over the 
sports pages of local and national 
press. 

"I-^ust questioned what I really 
wanted to do and whether I really 
wanted to play basketball if 1 had to 
put up with all this," Davis said 
about the incident. "There were so 
many emotions involved and me just 
being a kid and not really knowing 
how (to deal with it), it was just like i 
was falling apart." 

However, with the help of his 
grandmother Lela Nicholson, who 



had raised Davis since he was thre4 
years old, and his sister, the (t-i 
guard decided to go ahead with the 
college route. And his grandmother 
was a major factor in helping him 
make his college selection. I 

Though Davis had committed tq 
UCLA during the early signing peri] 
od, he reneged when Harrick was 
dismissed. -'^- j 

He then considered going, ironi^ 
cally enough, to Kansas, but finally 
revealed his choice on national telC' 
vision in April. ' i-^v* | 

"(My grandmother) has just beeri 
there for me and I couldn't see why I 
couldn't do the same," Davis said. 
"By going away, 1 wouldn't be there 
when she needed me. That's the 
main reason why I came here to be 
close to her and just be able to have 
that relationship instead of making 
it long distance." 

But regardless of the paths that 
eventually brought them to 
Westwood, the backcourt tandem's 
friendship has shaped itself into the; 
best pair of freshman guards in thej 
country. Davis averages 11.5 points. 
4.2 rebounds and 5.3 assists and 
Watson contributes 5.9 points, 4.0 
boards and 3.7 assists. 

"If we didn't hang around \ 
wouldn't know what to expect frod 
him," Watson said. "But we dd 
everything together so I just know 
every time where he's going to be on 
the court." 

Watson's sixth-sense for Davis* 
whereabouts was no more evident 
than in their ESP-worthy variation 
of an allyoop against Oregon State 
on Jan. 8. Watson threw the ball off 
the glass and out of nowhere, Davis 
rose up amongst the Beavers to slam 
it home. 

"(Our friendship) helps out a lot," 
Watson said. "You're going to see as 
we get older, through the years that 
we play together, how much it 
helps." 



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Bruin bats overcome Lions' hearts 



BASEBALL* Awaiting Stanford showdown, No. 14 
UCLA shuts down late rally by LMU to win 10-4 



ByVytasMazdu 

Dally Bruin Staff 

When a baseball team allows a 
lot of hits but few runs, it's called 
scattering hits. 

When a team allows few hits but 
a lot of runs, it's called being vic- 
timized by the hits. 

On Wednesday, the UCLA 
pitching staff scattered the hits 
while the Loyola Marymount staff 
was victimized by them. -i-r:— 

In front of a crowd of 102 at 
Jackie Robinson Stadium, the No. 
14 Bruins (7-4) took advantage of 
almost every chance they got 
against the visiting Lions (6-5-1 ) to 
wind up with their sixth-straight 
win by a score of 10-4. The domi- 
nant victory provides the Brums 
with some much needed confi- 
dence before a showdown against 
top-ranked Stanford this weekend 
at home. 

"It feels good," junior outfield- 
er Eric Valent, who in the bottom 
of the seventh hit his fourth home 
run in four games, said. "Things 
are coming along. I think that's 
our sixth win in a row. We're play- 
ing good. No errors on the board 
today. Our pitchers did pretty 
good. Everything is just coming 
along pretty good." 

The Bruin^ pitchers looked 
sharp early - especially sopho- 
more starter Ryan Reightley. 
Pitching only two innings in order 
to start again on Sunday against 



the Cardinal, Reightley retired all 
six men he faced in only 23 pitches. 
Sophomore Gabe Crecion (1-0) 
pitched four innings of relief. He 
allowed only five hits and an out- 
standing zero walks to lower from 
an astronomical 32.40 ERA to a 
more respectable 7.45. 



"Guys are getting 

better and as long as 

they keep improving 

we'll be good." 

TimLeary 

« Pitching coach 



Only one of UCLA's five pitch- 
ers suffered from control problems. 
After pitching a perfect seventh 
inning, freshman hurler Charles 
Merricks walked three and allowed 
one hit before being pulled in the 
eighth inning - LMU's best offen- 
sive inning by far. 

*i praised the pitching staff." 
UCLA head coach Gary Adams 
said. "I fdt like that was the differ- 
ence in the game up to that point. 
We hadn't walked anybody and 
they had. It was just a good outing 
by our pitching staff." 

UCLA's pitching coach Tim 
Leary believes that experience 



gained by this young pitching staff 
early in the season is finally start- 
ing to show. 

"Guys are getting better and as 
long as they keep improving we'll 
be good," Leary said. "There's a 
lot of p>otential on this team." 

On the offensive end, LMU 
accumulated more hits than the 
Bruins (8-7), but UCLA's philoso- 
phy of swinging for the fences on 
Wednesday translated into four 
extra-base hits - two triples (left 
fielder Brett Nista, Valent) and 
two homers (first baseman 
Cassidy Olson, Valent). 

"What 1 think happened is: 
we've been hitting these old, 
water-logged balls for so long 
because of the rain in Cal," Nista, 
who extended his team-high hit- 
ting streak to 12 with his triple, 
explained. "We broke out some 
nice white ones today and every- 
one was trying to see just how far 
they could hit it." 

Xnother important statistic was 
the zero errors allowed by the 
Bruin defense. For the first time in 
II games UCLA played flawless 
defense. 

• • • 

On a down note, fifth-year 
senior Nick Theodorou will be out 
three to six weeks with a torn right 
hamstring. 

Theodorou, UCLA's starting 
second baseman, suffered the 
injury on Friday at Cal while slid- 
ing into second base on an 
attempted steal. 

Junior Jack Santora will take 
Theodorou 's place on the field for 
the Bruins. — . - - 



Team hopes injuries won't 
keep players from victory 



W.TENNIS: UCLA expects 
indoor gameplay to ^e an 
advantage in tournament 



By Jared Hummel 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Fresh off the injury list and with 
only one match each under their 
belts, sophomore Katia Roubanova 
and freshman CristinaPopescu will 
receive a baptism by fire today. 



WOMEN'S;ilNNIS 



UC14 



vs. 

ITA/USTA 
Team Indoors 



Feb. 19-22 
Madison, Wl 




ERNEST LEEA)aily Bruin 



Those two will join forces with 
the rest of the UCLA women's ten- 
nis team as they take on the nation's 
best at the USA/ITA Women's 
National Indoor Team Tennis 
Championship. 

The Bruins will square off against 
No. II William an% Mary 
University today at 9 a.m. 

This tournament features 16 
schools out of the Rolex Collegiate 
Tennis Ranking's top. 

Eight matches will be played 
daily, culminating with the two 
teams with the best records playing 



each other in the championship 
finals on Feb. 22. 

UCLA head coach Stella 
Sampras is confident about her 
team's chances going into this high- 
ly competitive tournament, partially 
because the matches are all played 
indoors. 

"Our team plays well indoors," 
Sampras said. 

"We have a lot of big hitters, big 
serves and that (type oQ game plays 
well indoors. 1 think we'll do really 
well." 

The Bruins have yet to wiii ia title 
in this tournament, although they 
reached the finals in 1990 and 1995. 
If UCLA can ^et past William 
and Mary today they will most like- 
ly play No. 1 seeded Duke in 
tomorrow's matchup. 

Duke enters the tournament 
ranked No. 3 in the nation but is 
undefeated in dual match play, 
including an impressive 8-1 victory 
over Wisconsin, the tournament's 
host. 

The Bruin's No. I player, ^pho- 
more Annica Cooper, with her per- 
fect 6-0 record in dual match play, 
has earned herself a No. 26 ranking. 
She will take on William and Mary 
senior and No. 12-ranked Lauren 
Nikolaus. 

This tournament should be a 
good test of this UCLA team's tal- 
ent. 

■ By Sunday evening Coach 
Sampras should know where her 
team's strengths and weaknesses lie. 
As a result, she will know what 
needs to be worked on in the coming 
weeks. . l , . . .. 



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46 Thursday, February 1 9, 1 998 



CALIFORNIA SPORTS 




Suns 110, 

Lakers 1 03 



The NBA playoffs are still months away, 
but you wouldn't know it by the game faces of 
the Phoenix Suns. 

Rex Chapman scored seven of his 26 
points in the final 6:36 as the Suns snapped an 
eight-game losing streak to the Los Angeles 
Lakers with a 1 10-103 win Wednesday night. 

"It was pretty intense out there, like a play- 
off game for us," said Chapman, who made a 
key basket with 91 seconds remaining to blunt 
a Laker rally. "We kept our composure and 
focus out there and everybody made plays. 
The big thing is we gained a full game on them 
in the standings. We want to make a run and 
finish as strong as we can." 

Cliff Robinson added 25 points and 
Antonio McDyess had 20 and 1 1 rebounds 
for the Suns, who won their third in a row and 
eighth in the last 1 1 games. 

Los Angeles dropped its third straight 
despite Shaquille O'Neal's 30 points and 20 
from Eddie Jones. The Lakers played without 
All-Star guard Nick Van Exel, who has a sore 
right knee. 

"I'm not going to make excuses, but the 
Suns made great shots - off the wrong-leg 
jumpers - and we just couldn't keep up with 
that," O'Neal said. "They were hitting huge 
shots, especially Chapman. It seemed like 
everything he threw up went in all night." 

There were 16 ties and II lead changes 
before Phoenix went ahead to stay at 86^4 
with 8:58 remaining when McDyess slammed 
in Danny Manning's missed layup. 

George McCloud, who had 14 points, sank 
his second 3-pointer of the game with 8:33 left 
and added a jumper with 7:40 showing to give 
the Suns a 91-86 lead. 

When O'Neal and Rick Fox were each hit 
with technical fouls for arguing a charging 
call. Chapman converted both free throws 
with 6:36 to play to make it 93-87. 

Chapman's 3-point goal - his fifth and 



Phoenix's ninth in 14 tries - put Phoenix up 
100^9 with 5:01 left. 

But Jones scored four points in an 8-0 run 
as the Lakers took a 100-97 lead on Derek 
Fisher's free throws with 2:48 remaining. 

Elden Campbell, who finished with 16 
points olT the bench, got the Lakers within 
102-100 on a three-point play with 1:48 to 
play. 

Chapman drove the baseline and hit a run- 
ning right-hander with 1:31 left and McDyess 
had an uncontested dunk oft" Robinson's feed 
for a 106-101 lead with 57 seconds to play. 

Robinson's off-balance jumper from the 
left wing made it 108-103 with 20.8 seconds 
left to seal the Suns' first win over the Lakers 
since Nov. 25. 1995 ,^:^^ ■--■' 




Warriors 88, 
Hornets 77 



All it takes is a team shakeup to shape up 
the Golden State Warriors. 

"It seems like we've played our best bas- 
ketball this season in the face of adversity," 
said coach P.J. Carlesimo after the Warriors 
defeated the Charlotte Hornets 88-77 
Wednesday night. 
'^ Playing without traded starters Joe Smith 
and Brian Shaw, and stiH awaiting the arrival 
of Jimmy Jackson and Clarence 
Weatherspoon from Philadelphia. Golden 
State never trailed after halftime 

"We can focus more now," said Donyell 
Marshall, who along with Tony Delk scored a 
team-high 20 points. "We know who's going 
to be here. We can just go out there and play." 

After terminating Latrell Srre well's con- 
tract last December, the Warriors won six of 
their next 12 games, their best stretch of the 
season. 

Then they lost 22 of 23 leading up to the 
trade rumors swirling, around Smith last 
weekend. Now they've won two straight at 
home, beating a winning team for just the 
third time this season. 



Sports ' 

Bruins swing for slice of Nstory 
with attempt to pull off 3-peat 

M.TENNIS: UCLA has difficult ^^is field of 16, the only team they have lost t< 



M.TENNIS: UCLA has difficult 
opposition to beat in quest for 
team indoor championship title 



By Stephanie Chan 

Daily Bruin Contributor : 

For the UCLA men's tennis program, set- 
ting records is nothing new. The Bruins are 
-lied with Stanford and USC for holding the 
most NCAA team titles with 15 apiece. But 
one record that only UCLA is in the position 
to own this season is the label of first school to 
win three straight USTA/ITA Mens National 
Team Indoor Championships titles. 

Last year, the Bruins defeated Fresno State, 
Duke, Mississippi and Georgia en route to the 
1997 National Team Indoor title. 

Starting today and lasting until Sunday, the 
Bruins will be fending olTthe top teams in the 
nation in search of the three-peat. The tourna- 
ment field includes the nation's 12 top-ranked 
teams and four regional representatives. All of 
the teams are in the top 25. 

UCLA has only played one of the teams in 



this field of 16, the only team they have lost to 

use. Peppcrdine. who the Bruins were 
scheduled to play but did not due to rain, is 
also among the pool of UCLA's potential 
competitors. ' 

First up for the No. 2 Bruins is No. 15 
Illinois. Excluding tournament appearances, 
the mini enter the National Team Indoors 1-0 
with a victory over No. 21 Northwestern. 
They are ranked No. 1 in their region and 
boast two ranked players. No. 57 Oliver 
Freelove and No. 86 Cary Franklin. 

The new February ITA rankings have 
UCLA's Vince Allegre at No. 9, Jtean-Noel 
Grinda at No. 12, Matt Breen at No. 30 and 
Jason Cook at No. 77. The only Bruin to move 
up the ladder was Breen, jumping up from No. 
54. 

The team enters the tournament 6-1 overall 
and 2-1 in Pac-IO play. 

If UCLA wins today's match they will face 
the winner of the No. 5 Missis§ippi/No. 12 
Pepperdine match on Friday. 

When the stakes are high, so is the adreiw- 
line. If the Bruins pump it up for this tourna- 
ment, they'll own a record they won't have to 
share with Stanford and Southern Cal. 



Noticed those thinss that look like 
Sarbase cans but have blue lids? 

They're not for garbage! 

^Ifie fids are a different cobrfor a reason. 

(llftcjcit) 



Sliakeys 



Any large Pizza, yow choice of toppings and crust, for $939 

824-41 11 



1114 Gayley Ave. ""^ 

Westwood Village ^^„.^„„»u^ 



to 1 a.m. Sunday-Thursday 
to 2 a.m. Friday A Saturday 



Mpi) s Colleac Bdskc-tb.ill 
How The Top 2S fared 



1. North Oroiifu (26-1) did not pt<y. 
Next: vs. North Carolina State, Saturday 

2. Duke (24-2) beat Clemson 70-66. Next: 
vs. No. 12 UCLA, Sunday. 

3. Arizona (22-3) dkl not play. Next; at 
Oregon State, Thursday. 

4. Kansas (28-3) did not play. Next: vs. 
Iowa State, Saturday. 

5. Purdue (22-5) lost to Iowa 88-69.Next: 
at Penn State, Saturday 

6. Utah (21 -2) did not play. 

10. Stanford (21 -3) did not play. Next: vs. 
Washington, Thursday. 

1 1 . New Mexico (20-3) did not play. Next: 
vs. Texas-El Paso, Thursday. 

12. UCLA (20 5) beat Southern California 
82-75, OT. Next: at No. 2 Duke, Sunday 

1 3. South Carolina (19-5) lost to No. 16 
Arkansas 96-88. Next: at Florida, Saturday 

14. Michigan State (19-5) did not play. 
Next: at Wisconsin, Saturday. 

15 Mississippi (18-5) beat LSU 83-57. 
Next: at Mississippi State, Saturday. 

16 Arkansas (21 -5) beat No. 1 3 South 
Carolina 96-88 Next: vs. Auburn, Saturday 

17. Cincinnati (19-5) did not play Next: at 
Alabama-Birmingham, Thursday 

18 Massachusetts (19-7) lost to Rhode 
Island 87-85, 20T. Next: vs. St. Joseph's, 
Saturday. 

19. Texas Christian (23-4) did not play. 
Next: vs. Na 1 1 New Mexico, Saturday. 

20 West Virginia (21-5) did not play Next: 
vs Seton Hall, Sunday. 

2 1 . Syracuse (20-5) did not play. Next: at 
Rutgers, Saturday 

22. Michigan (18-8) did not play Next: vs. 
Indiana, Sunday. 



23 Illinois (19-8) beat Northwestern 69- 
57. Next: vs. Iowa, Sunday. 

24. George Washington (20-6) did not 
play. Next: vs. lemple, Sunday. 

25. MaryUnd (15-8) did not pUy. Next: vs. 
Wake Forest, Thursday 



Olvmpif Mfd-iK 
At A OI>*n*«' 



Germany 

Norway 

Russia 

Austria 

Canada 



United Sutes 5 1 

NetherUnds 4 4 

FinUnd 2 3 

Japan 

Italy 

France 

Switzerland 

China 



1 5 

2 1 



South Korea 2 



Czech Republic 1 



Sweden 

Belarus 

Bulgana 

Denmark 

Ukraine 

Australia 

Belgium 

Kazakstan 



Tot 

24 

20 

14 

14 

12 

10 

10 

10 

8 

8 

6 

6 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



Men* Colleae Brt^hrtbiiM 
Major Scores 



Bucknell 66, Holy Cross 65 

La Salle 80, Duquesne 77 

Lafayette 92, Army 57 

Lehigh 87, Coigatr 66 

Providence 59, Miami 57 

Rhode Island 87, Massachusetts 85, 20T 

Seton Hall 64, Rutgers 54 

St. John's 66, Boston College 61 

SOUTH 

Ooke 70, Clemson 66 
Georgia 78, Alabama 71 
G«orgM Tech 72, Florida St 59 
Grambling St. 71, Ark. Pine Bluff 70 
Hampton U. 71, Norfolk St. 70 
Kentucky 79, Rorida 54 
Marshall 70, Bowling Green 1} 
Memphis 83, Tulane 77 



Mississippi 83, LSU 57 • 

N.Carolina St. 74, Virginia 55 

N.C.-Asheville77,Elon53 

N.C.-Wilmington 85, Va. Commonwealth 

63 

Old Dominion 80, American U. 71 

Ridimond 61, Geor9e Mason 56 

SaiM Louis 58, Soutfwm Miss. 55 

VandetWt 82, Auburn 66 

Virginia Tech 54, Dayton 53 

Wiiam t Mary 74, East Carolina 69 

MBWEST 

Bradky 69, SW Missouri Si 65, OT 
Detroit 110, Oakland, Mich. 61 
E Michigan 97, CemMkhigan 82 
Winois 69, Northwestern 57 
WnoisSt.a0iE«am«Nt76,OT 
lndbMaSL72,S.Mnois71 
Iowa 88, Purdue 69 
Iowa St 63, Kansas St. 62 
Loyola, ■.61,Denver 49 
Miami, Ohio 85, Ohio U. 53 
Minnesota 82, Penn SL 77 
Nebraska 67, Missouri 66, OT 
W.Michigan 86, Toledo 76 
Wisconsin 65, Wis -MiKvaukee 58 

SOVTMWEST 

Arkansas %, South Carolina 88 
Oklahoma 75, Baylor 63 
Oklahoma St. 83, Texas Tech 81, OT 
Texas 87, Texas AJrM 74 

FMtWEST 

Fresno St 89, San Jose St. 81 
UCLA 82, Southern Cal 75, OT 



.il Bdsketb<ill As^ori.ilion 
At A Gl.iiio' 



EikSTERNCONrERfNa 

Atlantic Division 

W L Pa 

Miami 34 18 .654 

New Jersey 31 22 .585 

New York 29 22 .569 

Washington 27 27 .500 

Orlando 26 27 .491 

Boston 24 29 .453 

Philadelphia 16 33 .327 



Detroit 23 28 .451 141/2 
Toronto 11 40 J16 261/2 



WBTEMODNRRaia 

Midwest Division 

W I 
Utah 36 15 

SanAntonie 35 16 
Mimesou 28 23 
Houston 26 25 



G8 



VancoiMr 

Oalas 

Ofiwer 



Pd 

.706 — 

iK 1 

i49 8 

ilO 10 

14 38 J69 221/2 

10 42 .192 261/2 

5 46 .096 31 



Boston at Seatde, 10 p.m. 
Denver at Golden Sute, 10:30 pjn. 
Miami at Saaamcnto, 10J0 pjn. 

MllMihitttiywtilMianEBT. 




Padfk Division 

Seittle 40 12 

ULLakeis 35 15 

Phoenix 35 16 

PMland 31 21 

Saoramento 24 29 

L.A.aippers 11 41 

GoMenSute 10 41 



.769 — 

.700 4 

.686 41/2 

.596 9 

.453 161/2 

.212 29 

.196 291/2 



PMbddphia 98, Cleveland 97 
MiaiMl110,MinneseU84 
San Antonio 95, Detroit 94 
Chicago 1 OS, Indiana 97 
Phoenix 95, Dallas 77 
New York 91, Denver 77 
Portland 101, Golden State 83 
Sacramento 102, Boston 99 



Central Division 



Chicago 

Indiana 

Charlotte 

Atlanu 

Geveland 



39 
36 
30 
31 
28 
26 



15 
15 
22 
23 
24 
26 



.722 
.706 
.577 
.574 
538 
JOO 



GB 

31/2 

41/2 

8 

81/2 

101/2 

161/2 



11/2 
8 
8 

10 
12 



MiKvaukee 108, Washington 98 
Orlando 11 5, Minnesota 102 
AdanU 114, New Jersey 104 
Utah 94, New Yor* 78 
Phoenix 110, LA Lakers 103 
Seattle 101, Portland 95 
Boston 11 4, Vancouver 105 
Golden State 88, Charlotte 77 

laday^Cmwi 

Chicago at Toronto, 7 p m. 

PhUadriphia at Indiana, 7 p.m. 

San Antonio at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. 

Detroit at Houston, 8 30 pirn. 

Miami vs. L.A. Clippers at Anaheim, Calif, 

10:30 pm. 

Denver at LA. lakers, 10:30 p.m. 



FiMay%< 

Cleveland at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. 
Indiana at Orlando, 7:30 p.m 
Vancouver at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m 
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m. 
Toronto at Milwaukee, 9 p.m. 
Charlotte it Phoenix. 9 p.m. 
New York at Portland, 10 p,m. 



AMAHEIM ANGaS— Agreed la Imns 
with MF Chris Pritchett and RHP Brian 
Cooper on one-year csntracu. 
CMCAGO WMTE SOX— Agreed to term^ 
wMi 28 Ray Durham on a one-year con- 
tract. 

CaVELAND MDUNS— Agreed to tenns 
with LHP Mie Matthews, RHP Jason 
Rakeiv MF Russd kMyM. WF Sean 
Cascji MF CM F«Nlt MFIMiie 
SoBM, MF Enrique Wlson, OF Bruce Aven 
and OF Sott Morgan on one-year con- 
tracts. DesifMled LHP Jason Jacome for 
a rt ywwwtAf w id to terms with IB 
WflMffi Munoz on a minor-league con- 
tract. 

TEXAS RANGERS— Agreed to tenm with 
RHP Eric Moody on a one-year contract. 
ATLANTA BRAVES— Agreed to terms with 
C Javy Lopez on a one-year contract. 
CINCINNATI REDS— Agreed to terms with 
RHP Danny Graves and OF Eric Owens on 
one-year contrKts. 

PITTSBURGH PIRATES— Agreed to terms 
with RHP Jason Schmidt on a three-year 
contract. 

NaliaMd BaslH«kall AtMdatiM 
TORONTO RAPTORS -Traded G Kenny 
Anderson, C Zan Tabak and F Popeye 
Jones to the Boston Celtics for G Chauncey 
BiNups, G Dee Brown, F John Thomas and 
F Roy Rogers.' 

VANCOUVER GRIZZLIES— Traded 6 
Anthony Peeler to the Minnesota 
Jimbcrwohies for G Doug West Traded F 
Otis Thorpe and G Chns Robinson to the 
Saaamento Kings for G Bobby Hurley am) 
P Michael Smith 

IMmmI FmiMI LMMt 

CAROLINA PANTHERS-Signed CB Doug 

Evans to a five-year contract 

DETROIT IIONS—Signed DT Dan Owens. 

Named Charfie Sanders scout 

INDIANAPOLIS COLTS— Signed CB Jeff 

Burris to a fhw-year contract. 

JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS— Signed DE Jeff 

Lageman. 

NFW YORK GIANTS— Signed LB JcsM . . 

Armttead to a five-year contract. ^~„ 



NEW YORK JETS— Signed C Mike Gisler. 
OAKLAND RAIDERS— Named Chuck 
Bresnahan defensne backs coach, Frank 
Gansz Jr. spedal teams coach and Mike 
Wauie defensive line coach. 
PMLAOaPHIA EAGLES— Named Juan 
Castife offensne line coach, iim B otww 
tight ends coach, and John HailM«|ll spe- 
cial teams coach. 

PITTS6UMH SHELERS— Signed NT JoH 
Steed to a four-year contract. 
ST. LOUK RAMS— RHeased OE Leslie 
OHeaL 

SAN OIEGO CHARGERS— Signed OT John 
Jackson. 

SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS— Promoted Greg 
Knapp from offensive guakty control 
assioant to offensive assistant-quarter- 
backs coach. Named Andy Sugaman 
offensive quality control assistant. 



CAlfiARY FLAMES— Assigned D^F Jamie 

AlMi to Saint John of the AHL. Signed 

RW Martin St Louis. 

DETROIT RED WINGS— Assigned G David 

Arsenault to Adirondack of the AHL 

NEW YORK RANGERS— fired Colin 

Campbell, coach. 

TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING— Recalled G Zac 

Bierk from Adirondack of the AHL. 



^ 



COUEtf 

AURORA— Extended the contract of 

Frank McQuade, women's basketball 

coach, thmgh the 1998 99 season. 

HOFSTMA — Announced the resignation 

of Michad Gcfabia, defensive backs coach, 

to accept a similar position at the 

University of Buffalo. 

OKLAHOMA SIATE— Named Art Walter 

defensive tackles coach. «1 

VIRGINIA TECH— Named Bryan "^ '* ''' 

Stineifrmg offensive Vmt coach. 



1 . Who was the fkst golfer to earn over $1 
millian doNin in career earnings? 

2. Wbo it the only person that has been 
lndgc«d into the Basketbalt Ha« of Fame 
as boAi a piqtrand coach? 

3. What team won the Rrsi-ever NBA 
draft lottery? 



apWIV«**«NE 

MUJIC^PfOUJVl 



il; 



Daily Bruin Sports 



Thursday, February 19, 1998 47 



SOFTBALL PREVIEW 



Rookies step up to the plate with confidence 




FEATURE: Team unites, 
shares leadership duties 
for surprising success 



By Rocky Salmon 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

"Its the end of the world as we 
know it," could have been the theme 
song this year for the UCLA softball 
team. 

But a funny thing happened in 
between the tear-jerking loss to— 
Arizona in the World Series last year 
and the opening game of this year's 
probation season. 

An influx of rookies showed up in 
Westwood to complete the REM 
song, "and they feel fine." 

This year could have been the nail 
in the coffin for a program which 
appeared to be hit with the bats they 
were playing with. The NCAA ruled 
to let the Bruins finish last year but 
this year they can't make the play- 
offs. 

The alarm went off at UCLA and 
many of the all-stars on the team 
decided to redshirt, and the fresh- 



man phenom. Christa Williams, 
transferred and took with her 218 
strikeouts. 

But when the dust settled back 
onto the basepaths, nine new players 
were waiting to show the world what 
UCLA pride was about. With a bit 
of senior leadership, the Brums are 
6-0 heading into this weekend's tour- 
nament. 

The seniors may have started out 
the season carrying the team but 
now the leadership is taken over by 
new players each game. 
- — 'tAs the team meshed, different 
people have shown leadership in dif- 
ferent areas," pitching sensation 
Lindsey Gayer said. 

The new players had to pick up 
some of the leadership roles because 
they have to pick up right where the 
team last year left off. With a past 
filled with stories like UCLA soft- 
ball, every year is remembered and 
every team is aiming to beat the 
Bruins. .. ; 

"The new players have to cofTte 
into the program following phenom- 
enal athletes and it is overwhelm- 
ing," Nicole Odom, senior short- 
stop, said. "But they have done a 



great job ... every time they are on 
the field they are representing 
UCLA, but they handle it because 
they are fighters." 

One of the toughest fighters can 
be found behind 'the plate, Carissa 
Millsap, catching for three new 
UCLA pitchers to an pRA of under 
one. 

"Millsap has dorle an excellent 
job with the young pitching staff 
and carries a little pop in her bat." 
assistant coach Kelly Inouye-Perez 
said. 

That power was exhibited against 
Saint Mary's when she cranked her 
first UCLA homer. But things aren't 
as easy as they seem for Millsap, as 
her average has fallen to a paltry .1 1 1 
through six games. 

"It is hard coming in because I 
came from a different system with 
different coaches," Millsap, a 
Hofstra transfer, said. "But this 
team is unshakable. Whatever is 
thrown at us we just pick it up and 
take it in stride." 

Three pitchers who have had the 
most pressure placed upon them 



See FEATURE, page 40 



I 



IXRWCK KUDO 

The rain doesn't stop freshnnan Stephanie Swenson from pitching 
excellently against LMU. 

Probation will keep UCLA 
from all post-season play 

VIOLAnON: Appeal means that, regardless of season 
outcome, Bruins can't compete in thiis year's playoffs 

The Softball program had skeletons 



By Rocky Salmon 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

A shadow looms large over Eiiston 
Stadium this year. A large, dark gloom 
which dampens every win the softball 
team musters this year hangs in the sky 
above. 

Last year the only shadows on the 
softball diamond were from the players 
laughing and getting ready for the 
NCAA Tournament. 

With a No. 5 ranking going into the 
Regionals. the Bruins were gunning for 
their eiglith national title. Owning a 2 1 - 
7 conference record and pitching pow- 
erhouses Christa Williams aiKl B'Ann 
Bums. UCLA was ready for the 'Big 
Dance'. 

But then lightning struck. 



in the closets which ^were unearthed 
once more and UCLA felt the wrath of 
the NCAA Committee. On the verge 
of another World Series run. the Bruins 
were suspended from the post-season 
and put on probation for the 97-98 
year. 

In 9.V94 imd 94-95, the softball pro- 
gram awarded more scholarships than 
they were allotted. In 96-97 the skele- 
tons came back out to destroy the 
hopes and dreams of the Bruin softball 
team. 

In May, the devitstating news hit the 
squad as they prepared for their final 
games before the Regionals. 

"We were about to go to the World 

See PROBATION, page 41 



SOFTBALL POSITIONS 



Left field 

Casey Hiraiwa (Freshman) - 
Batting .308, Casey has been 
superb with the t)at. 



Center field 

Danielle Martin (Senior) - Martin has 

struggled at the plate, collecting only 

one hit, but is a key leader in the 

dubhouse. 



Right field 

Karen Hoshizaki (Senior) - 
I Batting second, Karen stands 
I with a .368 average, 7 hits and 

10 total bases. 



Shortstop 
Nicole Odom (Senior) - Hitting 
third with a .412 average, Odom is 
second on the team with a .647 
slugging percentage. 



Second base 
Laurie Fritz (Senior) - As the lead-ofl 
hitter, Fritz has exploded with a .421 
batting average, 8 hits and a .45Son 
base percentage. 



Third lasc 
Jenny Gardner (Fr) - Biggest 
surprise, Gardner has played 
outstanding defense and is 
hitting a decent .263. 






Pitchers 
Stepttanie Swenson 



1 J (Freshman) - at a 3-0 record, .86 
Sbm/ ERA, and 1 1 SO, Swenson has 

become a diamond in the rough. 
Erin WeHer (Junior) - a 3-0 
record with no eamed nins, 
Weiler is so far unhittable. 



Hrsttase 

Kim Wuest (Senior) - Batting 

clean-up, Wuest is in a zone, 

batting .438, with 2 homers, 6 

RBI's and a torrid .875 slugging 

percentage. 



Catcher 

Carissa IIMIsap (junior)- 
MHsap has struggled at the 
plate, but has handled a young 
pitching staff to an ERA under 
one. 



Designated hitter 
Marin Noack (Freshman) - 
Batting .250, Noack has a niche 
"I for herself in the line-up. 



SoixmdASwiminfc 



ERNEST LEE/IXsily Bruin 



Bruins leave disaster beNnd, start season with winning streak 



SOFTBALL: Young team 
relies on positive attitucie 
to go beyond obstacles 



By Trad Made 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

They never saw them coming. 

After all, what chance does a team 
riddled with the defection of Christa 
Williams to Texas, the graduation of 
a majority of its marquee players, 
and a controversial suspension from 
the NCAA tournament have in the 
competitive world of college soft- 
ball? 
\ A better chance than most, appar- 
ently. 

The UCLA Bruins, beset with 
, obstacles that rival those of the men's 



J , 

basketball team, have left rftgativity 

in their wake en route to a 6-0 start 

this season. With decisive victories 

over St. Mary's, Santa Clara 

University, and Loyola Marymount. 

the Bruins have proven that they 

have guts and ability to spare. 

UCLA has outscored its opponents 

31-7 in its first six contests. 

Assistant coach Kelly Inouye- 
Perez summed it up perfectly, say- 
ing, "We came out playing UCLA 
ball from the start." 

"A majority of the teams we've 
played (so far this season) were 
excellent teams to start off against, 
because these games provide a lot of 
confidence," says head coach Sue 
Enquist. 

If the Bruins ware in need of confi- 
dence before, playing against St 
Mary's boosted it for them. The 



IB^ 



Bruins defeated the Gaels handily, 
winning 7-1 and 5-2; behind the tor- 
rid hitting of senior Laurie Fritz. 



SOFTBALL PREVIE W 

Stanford 
Long Bwch St. 

Stanford 
Long Beach St. 

Stanford 
Long Beach St. 

Stanford 
Long Beach St. 




ERNEST lEE/0<ily Brum 



Fritz, who so far this season is bat- 
ting .421, led the Bruins with three 
runs scored in both contests com- 
bined. 



"Every team wants jo get us, 
because there are some teams who 
have never beaten us." says Fritz. 

No matter how badly the Gaels 
wanted to "get" the Bruins, they 
failed miserably. St. Mary's only 
managed to notch five hits over the 
course of both games, thanks to 
pitchers Stephanie Swenson and 
Erin Weiler. 

Pitching was also the story of the 
Santa Clara series. Swenson and 
Weiler once again held the oppo- 
nent's bats silent, holding the 
Broncos to only one run scored. 

The Bruins, on the other hand, 
had no problem getting across the 
plate, scoring 1 1 runs in the two 
games. One of those runs belonged to 
Kim Wuest. who "belted .the 21st 

SeeREaF,pa9e43 




DEIWCKKUDO 

Senior Laurie Fritz runs to first 
at contact in a game against 
LMU this year. 



48 ThurvJay, Ffbniary 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin Sports 



■"■:{ 
*'■> 






' ' . :l 



V u' 



ti 
ii 
It 



SPORTS 




^^^backcourt 

TEAMWORK: Baron Davis, Earl Watson take buddy 
system to the floor for some great basketball plays 



By Emmanuelle Ejercito 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



JAMIE SCANLON JACOeS/Dady ftuin 

Baron Davis (I.) and Eari Watson's friendship makes for great teamwork 



There are some things that can't 
be mentioned without the other. 

Abbott and Costello. Yhi and 
Yang. Fred and Barney. Jack and 
Coke. 

And for the UCLA men's bas- 
ketball team, there's Baron and 
Earl. Or Eari and Baron. Either 
way, the two freshmen guards have 



staked their claim as the kings of 
the Bruin backcourt. 

"They have done wonders in 
our backcourt." senior forward 
J.R. Henderson said. "They pres- 
sure guards, they make some pret- 
ty big plays down the stretch that 
have helped us win a lot of basket- 
ball games. 

"I think that without them we 

See MVIS-WilTSON, page 44 



Bruins pull out all stops in overtime 



M. HOOPS: Bailey takes control 
to turn around game against 
Trojans with Henderson's help 



By Emmanuelle Ejerdto 

Daily Bmin Senior Staff _ 

It's something that the No. 12 UCLA men's 
basketball team hasn't seen in awhile - a smile on 
Toby Bailey's face. And boy, did he have reason to 
smile, 

Bailey had a huge hand in the Bruins' much- 
needed overtime victory over LJSC, 82-75. com- 
ing up with the key rebounds, dishing out the 
needed assists and making the clutch shots, before 
a split crowd of 7,167 at the Los Arieeles Sports 
Arena on Wednesday night. «». 

The 6-foot-5-inch guard was comirig off of a 
sub-par performance against California last 
Saturday, when he was two-of-nine from the field, 
scored only seven points and committed eight 
turnovers in his 39 minutes. The stats were the 
after-effects of the 84-81 Stanford loss in which 
Bailey slipped in the waning seconds as he tried to 
go for the game-tying basket. 

"I was just mentally drained, I think that 
Stanford game took a lot out of me," Bailey said. 
"After falling down, 1 was thinking about that 
every night before going to sleep." 

Even his practices were affected. Bailey, for the 
first time since his freshman year, didn't start the 
first half of the Southern Cal match-up. UCLA 
head coach Steve Lavin didn't start the senior 
because of his lack of intensity in practice. 

"He's done a tremendous amount for UCLA 
basketball so by no means am I down on Toby 
Bailey, or he's in my doghouse," Lavin said. "It's 
just a simple wake-up call to let him kno)v that 
you've got to practice with high energy, you're got 
to play with high energy and 1 thought tonight he 
did a great job of that." 

UCLA (20-5 overall, 104 Pac-10) found itself 




AARON TOUT/Oaiy B»mn 

See M. MSKETBAU, page 42 Toby BaHey fights for the ball with Anthony WhHc in an overtime wiit againsf USC, 82-75. 



Great play sets Bruins up for win over Gauchos 



IF 



=^_-^, 



M. VOLLEYBALL Despite a new lineup and limited 
practice time, UCLA goes in for quick, merciful kill 



Byl 

Daily Bmin Staff 






tv 



Chalk up another win for the UCLA 
men's volleyball team. 

The Bruins took even less time to 
dispose of UCSB than it did for the San 
Diego schools. In less than an hour- 
and-a-half, UCLA swept the Gauchos 
1S«, IW, 154. 

"It was a new lineup with two days' 



practice, so I was pleased with it," 
UCLA head coach AJ Scates said. 

"Ben (Mosdle) got off to a pretty 
slow start that first game. We started 
out pumping him a lot of sets just to see 
if he could do it but he got it home. He 
made some real nice blocks so it gives 
us yet more flexibility than we had prior 
to this nuitch." 

Moselle, who moved to the opposite 
position after Evan Thatdier was side- 



lined with back spasms, led the team in 
hitting with 1 2 kills and two errors in 2 1 
attempts for a .476 dip. Normally a 
swing hitter, he also recorded two solo 
blocks and two block assists. 

"I still have a lot of things to learn," 
Moselle said. "But, I like the hitting 
aspect. I like to hit a lot of sets and I like 
to stay in the fiow of hitting. 

"I blocked a few balls at the end so I 
was starting to get comfortable block- 
ing on the right side. I don't have a fed 
for the digging yet." 

But it wasn't only Moselle who had 



f^ 



\ 



the offensive firepower. The Bruin 
offense overpowered the Gauchos. 
UCLA hit .439 while holding UCSB to 
a measly .200. 

Junior Fred Robins spiked 10 kills in 
17 attempts with no errors for a .588 hit- 
ting percentage. Robins also posted a 
team-high 12 digs. In his first match 
back from injury, sophomore Adam 
Naeve also contributed 12 kills. UCLA 
abo ouMocked the Gauchos nine to 
five. In addition the Bruins aoed Santa 



42 



if 



Disgraceful men, 
graceful women 
should \xR off 




Mark 
Shapiro 



in grudge match 

COLUMN: Battle of the 
century might be more 
balanced than you think 

It has been pretty insane around 
the sports department for the last 
few hours, because we've all been 
working the phones like mad. Don 
King, Vince McMahon, even those 
ASUCLA employees who put on 
movies all the time, any and all pro- 
moters have been our targets 
because 1 have hit upon a pay-per- 
view gold mine. 

In light of 
recent ice- 
bound events in 
Nagano, I sud- 
denly reached a 
position of per- 
fect clarity as 
this idea was 
revealed. 

I am 
absolutely cer- 
tain that this 
possible 
matchup would 

galvanize the nation and relegate 
the Bobby Riggs/Billie Jean King 
"Battle of the Sexes" to has-been 
status. 

I can see it in lights hung over a 
custom-made rink at the Mirage ... 

"The Golden Ladies of the ' 
Puck " vs. "The Goats of Nagano." 
as the men's and women's U.S. 
hockey teams get set to play each 
other. 

Now, everyone probably refiex- 
ively thinks that such a matchup 
would be a blowout, that it would - 
take the idea of gender-bashing to a 
level that Thelma and Louise could 
never have possibly considered.^« 

The default feeling is probably 
that one team would capitalize on 
its recent hype and turn the opposi- 
tion into the laughingstock of its 
sex. 

But that really wouldn't be the 
case. I don't think that the game 
would be a blowout at all, even 
though one of the teams would cer- 
tainly be a prohibitive underdog. 

Seriously. I really think the men 
could give their female counter- 
parts a run for their money, even 
though all results and even cont-'* 
mon sense would point to the con- 
trary. ^ 

1 know that the hockey countfr- 
part to international basketball's 
Dream Team was supposed to at 
least make a run for the gold at 
Nagano. And I know that our col- 



BRUIN UPD ATE 

Wednesda 





48 Thursday, February 19, 1998 



Daily Bruin Sports 



I \ < 



■Jh 



SPORTS 




TEAMWORK: Baron Davis, Earl Watson take buddy 
system to the floor for some great basketball 



s 



By Emmanuelle Ejercito 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff ^ 



JAMIE SCANLON JACOeS/Daily Brum 



Baron Davis (I.) and Eart Watson's friendship makes for great teamwork. 



There are some things that can't 
be mentioned without the other. 

Abbott and Costello. Yin and 
Yang. Fred and Barney. Jack and 
Coke. ^ 

And for the UCLA men's bas- 
ketball team, there's Baron and 
Earl. Or Earl and Baron. Either 
way, the two freshmen guards have 



^ 

staked their clairh as the kings ot 

the Bruin backcourt. 

"They have done wonders in 
our backcourt," senior forward 
J.R. Henderson said. "They pres- 
sure guards, they make some pret- 
ty big plays down the stretch that 
have helped us win a lot of basket- 
ball games. 

"I think that without them we 

~ See MVIS-WATSON, page 44 



Bruins pull out all stops in overtime 



^. HOOPS: Bailey takes control 
to turn around game against 
Trojans with Henderson's help 



By Emmanuelle Ejerdto 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

It's something that the No. 12 UCLA men's 
basketball team hasn't seen in awhile - a smile on 
Toby Bailey's face. And boy. did he have reason to 
smile. 

Bailey had a huge hand in the Bruins' much- 
needed overtime victory over USC, 82-75, com- 
ing up with the key rebounds, dishing out the 
needed assists and making the clutch shots, before 
a split crowd of 7,167 at the Los Angeles Sports 
Arena on Wednesday night. 

The 6-foot- 5-inch guard was coming ofT of a 
sub-par performance against California last 
Saturday, when he was two-of-nine from the field, 
scored only seven points and committed eight 
turnovers in his 39 minutes. The stats were the 
after-efTects of the 84-81 Stanford loss in which 
Bailey slipped in the waning seconds as he tried to 
go for the game-tying basket. 

"I was just mentally drained, 1 think that 
Stanford game took a lot out of me," Bailey said. 
"After falling down, I was thinking about that 
every night before going to sleep." 

Even his practices were affected. Bailey, for the 
first time since his freshman year, didn't start the 
first half of the Southern CaJ match-up. UCLA 
head coach Steve Lavin didn't start the senior 
because of his lack of intensity in practice. 

"He's done a tremendous amount for UCLA 
basketball so by no means am I down on Toby 
Bailey, or he's in my doghouse," Lavin said. "It's 
just a simple wake-up call to let him know that 
you've got to practice with high energy, you've got 
to play with high energy and I thought tonight he 
did a great job of that." 

UCLA (20-5 overall, 104 Pac-IO) found itself 




,« AARON TOUI/DdilyB(uin 

See M. BASKETBALL, page 42 Toby Bailey fights for the ball with Anthony White in an overtime win againsf USC, 82-75. 



Great play sets Bruins up for win over Gauchos 



M. VOLLEYBALL Despite a new lineup and limited 
practice time, UCLA goes in for quick, merciful kill 



By Grace W«i 

Daily Bruin Staff 

Chalk up another win for the UCLA 
men's volleyball team. 

The Bruins took even less time to 
dispose of UCSB than it did for the San 
Diego schools. In less than an hour- 
and-a-half, UCLA swept the Gauchos 
15^, 15-9. 15-4. 

"It was a new litieup with two days' 



practice, so I was pleased with It," 
UCLA head coach AJ Scates said. 

"Ben (Moselle) got off to a pretty 
slow start that first game. We started 
out pumping him a lot of sets just to see 
if he could do it but he got it home. He 
made some real nice blocks so it gives 
us yet more flexibility than we had prior 
to this match." 

Moselle, who moved to the opposite 
position after Evan Thatcher was side- 



lined with back spasms, led the team in 
hitting with 1 2 kills and two errors in 2 1 
attempts for a .476 clip. Normally a 
swing hitter, he also recorded two solo 
blocks and two block assists. 

"I stJI have a lot of things to learn," 
Moselle said. "But, I like the hitting 
aspect. I like to hit a lot of sets and 1 like 
to stay in the How of hitting. 

"I blocked a few balls at the end so I 
was starting to get comfortable block- 
ing on the right side, i don't have a feel 
for the digging yet." I 

But it wasn't only K^oselle who had 

- i 



\ 



the offensive firepower. The Bruin 
olTense overpowered the Gauchos. 
UCLA hit .439 while holding UCSB to 
a measly .200. 

Junior Fred Robins spiked 10 kills in 
1 7 attempts with no errors for a . 588 hit- 
ting percentage. Robins also posted a 
team4iigh 12 digs. In his first match 
back from injury, sophomore Adam 
Naeve also contributed 12 kills. UCLA 
also outblocked the Gauchos nine to 
five. In addition the Bruins aced Santa 



StcVNinBMLi,pagc42 




Mark 
Shapiro 



Disgraceful men, 
graceful women 
should face off 
in gru^e matdi 

COLUMN: Battle of the 
century might be more 
balanced than you think 



It has been pretty insane around 
the sports department for the last 
few hours, because we've all been 
working the phones like mad. Don 
King, Vince McMahon, even those 
ASUCLA employees who put on 
movies all the time, any and all pro- 
moters have been our targets 
because I have hit upon a pay-per- 
view gold mine. 

In light of 
recent ice- 
bound events in 
Nagano, I sud- 
denly reached a 
position of per- 
fect clarity as 
this idea was 
revealed. 

1 am 
absolutely cer- 
tain that this 
possible 
matchup would 

galvanize the nation and relegate 
the Bobby Riggs/Billie Jean King 
"Battle of the Sexes" to has-been 
status. 

1 can see it in lights hung over a 
custom-made rink at the Mirage ... 

"The Golden Ladies of the 
Puck" vs. "The Goats of Nagano," 
as the men's and women's U.S. 
hockey teams get set to play each 
other. 

Now, everyone probably reflex- 
ively thinks that such a matchup 
would be a blowout, that it would 
talce the idea of gender-bashing to a 
level that Thelma and Louise could 
never have possibly considered. 

The default feeling is probably 
that one team would capitalize on 
its recent hype and turn the opposi- 
tion into the laughingstock of its 
sex. 

But that really wouldn't be the 
case. I don't think that the game 
would be a blowout at all, even 
though one of the teams would cer- 
tainly be a prohibitive underdog. 

Seriously, I really think the men 
could give their female counter- 
parts a run for their money, even 
though all results and even com- 
mon sense would point to the con- 
trary. 

1 know that the hockey counter- 
part to international basketball's 
Dream Team was supposed to at 
least make a run for the gold at 
Nagano. And I know that our col- 

Se«SIUPIIO,pa9e39 



BRUIN UPD ATE 

Wednesda 





SECOND EXPOSURE 



Friday, February 20,1 998 



Daily Bruin News 



DAILY BRUIN 



Editor in Chief: Urn Lekovic 
Managing Editor: Manhew Schmid 

NrmEdKor: Hannah Miller 

Assistant Newt Editon: Hala All, Mason Slockstill, 

Gregofy Mena, Stefanie Wong 

News Staff: Katie Combs, Carol McKay, Rachel Muno;, 

Michelle Navarro 

Viewpoint Editor: J Jioni Palmer 



Assistant Viewpoint Editor: Adam YamagiKhi 
Viewpoint Staff : Kan Browne 

A&E Editor: Cheryl Klein 

Assistant A&E Editors: Nerissa Pacio, Mike Prevail, 



Stephanie Sheh ' v "' 

A&E Staff: Aimee Phan, Vanessa VanderZanden 

Sports Editor Stan lohnson, Jr 

Assistant Sports Editors: Emmanuelle E|ercito,Traci 

Mack, Rocky Salmon 

Sports Staff: Brent Boyd. Mark Dittmer.Vytas Mazeika, 

Mark Shapiro 

Plioto Editor: Aaron Tout 

Assistant Photo Editors: Aelia Khan, Bill Weesner 

Photo Staff: Genevieve Liang, Jamie Scanlon- Jacobs 

Electronic Media Director: Km Stone 
Assistant EM Director: Mike Hall 



Art Director: Pat Coyne 
Tedtnical Director: Art Chang 

Production Editor: Diana Lee 

Art Director: Ernest Lee 

Slotten: Laura Brown, Kelly Fisher, Susie Keller, Kay 

Lai, Adam Yamaguchi 

Rimmers: Jeff Gold, Christine Hill, Kevin Kelly, Amy Lam, 

Vivian Shen, Amber Truxler, John Williams ■ 

Designers: Aaron Hand Janet Lee, Nina Sacks, John 

Suehiro, Ronaldo Sala^ar 

Illustrators: Genmi Burleigh, Danny Hong, Greg 

Magnuson, KiSung Sung June Kim, Noah Klein 



Business Manager. Guy Levy 
Advertising Assistant: Stefanie Roumelioies 

External Display Sales Manager Wesley L Negus 
Assistant Sales Managers: Brad Holder, Ryan Hung, 
Robert Isaacs 

Account Executives: Noah Boyens, Jesse Catrillo, Adam 
Dumper, Dan Green, Nicole Gurkin, Eric Seyverlsen, Josh 
Skalnik, Sarah laylor, Jeremy Wildman 



Classified Display Sales Manager: Alissa Morris 
Assistant Sales Manager: Jessie Schoenfeldi 
Account Exectuives: Aiyana Holm, Rebecca Hopkins, 
Annette Moon . 

Classified Line Manager Scott Kim 
Assistant Managers: Beckie Dibble. Connie Tcheng 
Classified Representatives: Tiffany Chan, Ronnie 
Jordan, Lena Kasahara, Michelle Lee, Stephanie Lin, 



Madhuri Pottathil, Michelle Rodriguez, Samantha Sher, 
Cecilia Tang Michelle Tseng 

Internal Display and Operations Manager Man 

Heinz 

University Account Executives: Mackenzie Cronin, 
Kelli Denning, Dave Dorfman, Lisa Giovanzana, Nicole 
Kohlentet Melanie Lukesh,Yen Nguyen, Jill Speicher 



Advertising Production Manager: Liz Magallanes 
Student Supervisor: Tristan Hufalar 
Creative Supervisor Tricia Choi 
Paste-up Supervisor: Grace Tomilloso 



Ads Productioi^taff: Ruben Carreno,Vefa Fainshtein, 
Danielle Dolisie, Justin Goldwater, Jerry Gonzales, Michael 
Hecht, Jung Yon KIrh, Ayako Kurokawa, Betty Miyoshi, 
ParulSanghai, Alex Weil 



Technical Operations Manager Michael O'Connor 
MIS Staff: Brian Bodenstemer, Christopher Bates 



Media Director Arvii Ward 



Media Adviser Frances Femandes 



^Table of 
Contents 



Daily Bruin News 



Friday, February 20, 1998 3 






:•:;# 



Health care, page 3 
Chemical spill, page 3 
Malcolm exposed, page 5 
Adidas a-logo, page 5 




Pumping up, page 14 
E.T.eats pizza? page 14 
Fun in the sun, page 16 



USAC cover-ups, page 10 
Nationalism, page 11 

wffWmwm 

Hoop honors, page 22 
Duking it out, page 23 
Batter up, page 23 , 
Limbering up, page 24: J 




Sponsored by the 

Check out the "Educated 

Choices" in the on-line UCLA 
BookZone at www.iidastor«. 
uda.edu. Your practical self 
will like thp 30 percent dis- 
count. Updated every Monday! 








m Salt Lake City 

■ • Can't get enough of the winter Olympia? 
Check out the official page of the 2002 games. This 
should keep you amused for the 1,400 days until 
the next games begin. httpy/www.sk2002.org 



^ The First Olympic Games 

^ • After gazing at the future of the games, 
experience the past at this site, which details the 
games of 1896. 
http://orarna.com/athens1896/ ^ 



3. 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 

Official Winter Games Site 

Return to the present with the official site 
of the Nagano Olympics. This extensive site has 
everything from results to the weather in 
Nagano, http://www.nagano.olympic.org/ 




Applications for 

Assistant Viewpoint 

Editor are available at 

118 Kerckhoff Hall. 

The deadline has been 

extended to Feb. 24 

by 5 p.m. 




CONTACTS 




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News 




care 



Health plan aims to 

reduce medical fees 

, , while providing 

better, more efficient 

treatment for patients 



By Kathryn Combs 

Daily Bruin Staff 



The controversy surrounding 
■whether or not managed care is 
helping or hurting California's 
health care system is still brew- 
ing. 

Late last month. Gov. Pete 
Wilson unveiled his principles for 
the reform of managed care in 
California. Wilson indicated that 
any legislation should adhere to 
one very important principle: to 
preserve or improve the quality 
of care without diminishing 



access or harming the liealth^^ 
California's economy. 

Managed care is aliealth care 
plan designed to cut the cost of" 
medical services while improving 
patient outcomes. 

Despite all the political flurry, 
medical center ofTicials at UCLA 
say that managed care has had 
both positive and negative ertects 
on the delivery of health care in 
the last 12 years. 

"it does work," said Mary 
Frances Flynn, director of 
Managed Care Business 
Development. 

"It is a different system for 
people to learn, and as a patient 
there are many more perceived 
challenges in terms of receiving 
care," Flynn said. 

Nearly 85 percent of 



CalifornTans currently receive 
medical attention under man- 
aged care programs. However, 
just over 75 percent express satis- 
faction with these services, 
according to the Office of the 
Governor. ^Jv_ ____ 

"From the perception of the 
patient, managed care doesn't 
give them the freedom of choice 
that they have had in the past," 
said Dr. Michael Karpf. vice 
provost for hospital services at 
UCLA. 

"It is not quite as open as the 
health care system used to be," he 
added. Karpf was a member of 
the task force that contributed to 
Wilson's proposals. 

According to Gerald Levey, 
provost of the UCLA School of 
Medicine, managed care has a 



positive impact on the university. 

"Managed care has done 
some very good things for 
UCLA," said Levey. 

"It has forced us to look at all 
aspects of our operations and 
essentially made us a far more 
efficient hospital," Levey said. 

"It has enabled us to do things 
that five years ago would have 
been unimaginable," he added. 

Managed care has allowed the 
university to extend services out- 
ward to the surrounding commu- 
nity, Levey said. 

As a result, UCLA has built 
clinics in the surrounding com- 
munity and acquired the Santa 
Monica hospital in 1995 as part 
of the UCLA health care net- 

SeeMAHAGEDCARE,page6 




DAVID Mil I 



Students wait to take the bus at the Ackerman turnaround. The new buses hold fewer passengers. 

Better buses bring bigger lines 



CROWDING: Vehicles 
leave air cleaner, but 
hold fewer passengers 



By Scot Sargeant 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Although UCLA's new campus 
buses benefit the environment, they 
have caused new problems for stu- 
dents. 

UCLA's new environmentally 
friendly buses, which were intro- 
duced in January, hold fewer stu- 
dents than previous buses. 

These buses, which run on natural 
gas rather than diesel fuel, contain ?>!> 
seats, instead of the previous buses' 
36-seat capacity. Students are finding 
themselves waiting in increasingly 
longer lines. 

"Ever since they started using 
these new buses. I've been late to 
classes several times. I have to get to 
the stop a half-hour early some- 
times," said one student who wished 
to remain anonymous. 

This concern appears to be shared 
by students who have expressed frus- 



tration over the longer wait. 

"If you aren't one of the first peo- 
ple to run onto the bus, you will be 
lefi standing," said Angela Lang, a 
third-year sociology student. 

While the change in the number 
of seats may seem minimal, seating is 
not the only thing that afTects capaci- 
ty 

"The standing capacity is where 
we really see the difference," said 
Sherry Lewis, general manager for 
UCLA Reel and Transit Services. 

The total capacity in the new 
buses, including seats and standing 
room, is approximately 45 people. 
The old buses, by contrast, could 
hold about 55 students. 

Transit officials acknowledge 
receiving complaints from students, 
but no clear solution appears to exist. 

"I'm not sure how many people 
have called transit, but I have 
received some complaints. Most of 
the complaints I have received have 
dealt with the morning traffic," 
Lewis said. 

"There are so many students there 
that want a ride, and the buses are so 
full when they come by, that they 
can't even slop, " she continued. 



Onicials of UCLA Fleet and 
Transit Services are aware of the 
problem and are investigating meth- 
ods to ease the waiting time for stu- 
dents. 

"We are also looking into some 
other alternatives ... such as using 
some ofihe older buses, or redesign- 
ing the routes," she continued. 

According to Lewis, UCLA has a 
supply of II new buses, but only 
eight are normally used. 

Six of these buses are designated 
to the Campus Express route, which 
constitutes the core route around 
campus, while two buses cover the 
Ackerman route. Occasionally, a 
ninth bus is utilized to alleviate stu- 
dent traffic. 

"There have been several times 
where we have put an additional bus 
on to minimize the impact to stu- 
dents," Lewis said. 

"It's my understanding that there 
is a lot of overcrowding now. What 
we're trying to measure right now is 
how many people are being left 
behind because of the buses being 
full," Lewis said. 

See BUSES, page 8 



Boelter chemical accident 
produces desired reaction 



SPILLS: Mishap proves 
HazMat, precautions can 
easily handle cleanups 



By Mason Stodcstill 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

A chemical spill Thursday morning 
caused Boelter Hall to be evacuated 
while UCLA Hazardous Materials 
(HazMat) cleanup squads secured the 
area. 

Four one-gallon containers of 
ammonium hydroxide broke open 
when the shelving unit that they were 
stored on apparently collapsed. 

"This is more than just a minor 
spill," said Michael Ceser, manager of 
education and training programs in 
the olTice of environmental heahh and 
safety. 

Ceser considered the cleanup of the 
spill "a success" because numerous 
safety precautions prevented any casu- 
alties. 

"The lab took all the necessary pre- 
cautions, and everything went like 
clockwork," he said. 

The cause of the spill has yet to be 
determined, but apparently the shelv- 
ing unit that the bottles were stored on 
collapsed when an employee was 
putting away some other chemicals. 

"The chemicals were properly 



stored, but the storage unit gave way, 
which caused the spill," Ceser said. 

After the initial entry team had. 
cleaned up the spill, they discovered 
that an acid spill may have also 
occurred. 

The team then re-entered the build- 
ing in different protective suits. 
because of differing levels of exposure 
to the chemicals. Apparently, they did- 
n't find another spill. 

The cleanup teams use meters to 
measure the amount of gases in'the itir, 
so that they will know when the caustic 
gases have dropped to an acceptable 
level. 

Ceser said that there were no casu- 
alties reported as a result of the spill. 
. "Everything is potentially danger- 
ous," he said, "but at this exposure 
level, there is no risk of death." 

The building was evacuated after 
the protection devices in the building 
detected the chemical in the air and set 
off the alarms. 

loannis Kanellakopoulos, an asso- 
ciate professor of electrical engineer- 
ing, left the building after the alarm 
went off. 

"There are sirens, strobe lights and 
a PA saying, 'Please evacuate the 
building,'" he said. 

According to Ceser, the system 
detected the gas in the air, triggered 

See SPILL, page 6 




AM4 SCANLON IACOBS/DjA Biuin 



Norm Sutherlin hoses down Michelle DeVoux of the HazMat team to 
remove contaminates from her suit after cleaning up a chemical spill. 



Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruiri News 



COMMUNITY BRIEFS 



Leave Iraq alone, 
Spartacists, others say 

"U.S. Get Your Bloody Hands Off Of The 
World" read one of several banners strewn 
across MeyerhofT Park at noon on Thursday as 
Spartacus, an anti-government student organi- 
zation, staged a rally in protest of military 
aggression in Iraq. 

Impassioned sp)eeches were given by mem- 
bers of both Spartacus and the Muslim Students 
group, each time punctuated by a different 
chant: 

"Defend Iraq. Down with U.S. imperialist 
attacks," shouted Paco repeatedly, the first of 
three speakers who refused to give his last name. 

Michelle Oberman, a senior sociology stu- 
dent and self<lescribed socialist, exhorted stu- 
dents to "defend the Palestinians" and "get 
ROTC off campus" during her turn on the mic, 
saying afterward: "We want a class struggle to 
defeat U.S. imperialism," adding ruefully, "I live 
in this society but I'm not part of this society." 

Spectators who took interest objected at 



times to the vitriolic nature of the 
speeches, one onlooker even clap- 
ping in mock appreciation after one of 
the speakers. ,-; 

On balance, however, the scene was greeted 
with cynicism and lack of interest. "I think it's 
just kind of trendy to be anti-U.S. policy these 
days." said Jason Nuesca, a third-year history 
student. 

Law school rankings 
cry wolf, study says 

Annual law school rankings relied upon by 
both prospective students and scouting law 
firms have a poor grasp of facts and should be 
ignored, according to an association of 162 of 
the nation's law schools. 

The rankings in question are published each 
year by U.S. News^ World Report. According 
to the nonprofit Association of American Law 
Schools, the ranking report has "many serious 
problems" and is "misleading and dangerous" 
says John Sexton, dean of the New York 




University School of Law. 

Sexton states that the biggest 

problems rankings have are that 

they assume every applicant has identical 

needs and desires, and the rankings "are driven 

by a reputation survey of persons who have little 

or no knowledge of what they are ranking." 

Other complaints from the Washington- 
based association are that the magazine rates 
schools using the median scores from law school 
admissions tests and also through the expendi- 
ture per student. These methods do not take into 
consideration of the quality of instruction and 
actually ends up penalizing a school that pro- 
vides top-quality education at a low cost per stu- 
dent. 

The magazine said the rankings, to appear in 
its March 2 issue, provide an efficient way for 
comparing schools based on independent 
assessment and the gathering of judgments that 
experts have made about each law school. The 
magazine also claims that the ratings are only a 
guide, it is not for readers to "substitute someone 
else's ranking system for (their) own best judg- 
ment." 



Protesters to march 
to 'Save the Dream' 



Thousands of people are expected to attend 
Monday's "Save the Dream" march to support 
affirmative action and oppose Proposition 226, 
the proposed "Anti-Labor" initiative. 

According to an LA. County Federation of 
Labor press release, Proposition 226 would 
make it illegal for unions to donate money to 
-politics without a going through a difficult 
process, making it harder for union members to 
have their voice heard in Upcoming November 
elections. 

Statistics say corporations outspent unions 1 7 
to one in donating money in the 1996 elections. 

The city-wide rally is sponsored by, among 
others, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, the Rainbow 
Coalition and the ACLU. 

The march begins at 8 a.m. in front of the Los 
Angeles Memorial Coliseum and ends at the 
Ronald Reagan State Building. 

Compiled form Daily Bruin staff reports. 



Daily Brum News 



Friday, February 20, 1998 5 




WHArS BRE WIN' TODAY 



SoufOtttJCLA WpifffRHw OTRrtnosphenL ^cieru: 



Chickei>«tick Bug Fade byjinwodak 




Captain's Log, Star date 2039. Note: Never invite 
Dr. McCoy Duck Hunting again! 



REMINDER 



• 



LAST DAY: 

For undergraduates 
change grading basis with a 
per-transaction fee. 



to 
$3 



LESS THAN TWO WEEKS 
LEFT: 

Until UCLA billing statements 
are mailed. 

To file financial aid applica- 
tions for 1998-1999. 

For continuing students to file 
applications for undergraduate 
scholarships for 1998-1999. 

DONT FORGET: 

Undergraduate enrollment 
appointments have begun 
through URSA telephone. 

Need to talk? Call the peer 
helpline at 794-HELP. 

The spring Schedule of 
Classes is now on sale at the 
UCLA Store. 

Need an escort? Call 794- 
WALK. 



Friday ^ 

UGLA Orientation Program 

Orientation assistant positions 

available 

Come pick up an application 

Applications due Feb. 27 

201 Corel Commons 

Noon 

UCLA Center for the Study of 

Religion 

Professor R. C. Motta 

Visiting scholar, department of 

history 

"Ethical and Sacrificial 

Religions" 

Von Grunebaum Library 

10383 Bunche Hall • 825-8948 

1 p.m. 

Jacob Marschak 

Interdisclipinary colloquium 

"Predicting Economic 

Recessions in the United States" 

By Vladimir Keilis-Borok of 

UCLA 

AGSM C-301 • 825-4144 

Environmental Coalition 

Documentary movie about ' 

human rights and democracy in 

Burma 

Ackerman 2408 • 206-4438 

7 p.m. 

Nation 2 Nation 

International stucknt game night 
e-mail for location 
N2N@ucla.edu 

Catholic Students Association 

Mardi-Gras Party 

Price: $3 nonmembers, $1 

members 

840 Hilgard Ave. -208-5015 

Melnitz Movies 

"Stranger Than Paradise" (7:30) 

James Bridges Theater ■ 206- 

8170 

Saturday 9 a.m. 

UCLA Center for the Physics 
and Chemistry of the Planets 
Free one-day symposium "How 
the Planets Work" 
World-class research scientists 
present most up to date 
knowledge and understanding of 
planets and planetary system. 



Fowler Museum Lenert 
Auditorium • 825-8752 

9 a.m. 

Golden Key National Honor 

Society 

Venice Beach cleanup 

e-mail gkey@ucla.cdu 

Rides available (9:45 a.m.) 

Meet at Lot 6 turnaround 

2 p.m. 

Vladimir Nabov's "Lolita" 

Will be discussed in the 

Masterworks of Literature 

Series. (2:30) 

Sherman Oaks Branch Library 

14245 Moorpark Street 

(818)981-7851 

4 p.m. 

UCLA American Indian Studies 

Center 

Native American poet Joy Harjo 

will perform with her 

band, Poetic Justice 

Armand Hammer Museum 

Sunday 3 p.m. 

Music of Japan 

Concert of traditional and 

contemporary music 

John Kaizan Neptune, Sawako 

Fukuhara and Kaori Washiyama 

will perform 

Schoenberg Hall Annex, Room 

1659 • (213)766-8460 

Monday 8 a.m. 

Save the Dream 

March and rally to fight the anti- 
labor initiative, jobs, education 
and access for our seniors, our 
youth and our future. 
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum 
794-0383 

Noon 

USAC Internal VP Office 

Student Issues Forum 

An opportunity to voice opinions 

on student issues 

Kerckhoff Grand Salon 

University Catholic Center 
Catholic Mass (12:10) 
Kerckhoff 400 

What's Brewin'can be reached via e-mail 
at whatsbrewin9media.ucla.edu 



The Daily Bruin (ISSN 10S0-S0M) it published and copyrighted by the ASUCLA Communications Board. All rights are reserved. Reprinting of any material in this publication without the written permission of the Communications Board is strictly prohibited The 
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disability, age, sex or* sexual orientation The ASUCLA Communications Board has a media grievance procedure for resolving complaints against any of its (Mjblications. For a copy of the complete procedure, contact the publications office at 1 18 Kerckhoff Hall All 
inserts that are printed in the Oaily Bruin are independently paid publications and do not reflect the views of the Editorial Board or the staff 

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People still know 

surprisingly little 

of Malcolm X 

and the battle 

he fought 



MalGolm 



By Carol McKay 

Daily Bruin Staff 

Over 70 years ago, a legend was born in 
Omaha. His name was Malcolm Little. Later, it 
would be El Hajj Malik el-Shabazz. Eventually, 
the world would know him as Malcolm X. But 33 
years after his death, most still know amazingly 
little about him. 

Perhaps the mystery stems from his numerous 
identities, his evolution of ideologies. Perhaps it 
was his oratorical command. Or perhaps it was 
the short span of the public's attention. 

One thing is clear, however; despite how little 
people know about Malcolm X, most feel awe 
for this historical figure. 

After losing his parents at a young age, 
Malcolm Little left school early and 
turned to a life of crime in the under- 
world of Harlem. Dealing and using drugs, he 
was sent to prison in 1946 for a 10-year sen- 
tence. 

While in prison, he explored Islamic studies 
and converted to the black nationalist theology 
of Elijah Muhammad. 

After his release from prison, Malcolm sought 
publicity, delivering infiammatory speeches and 
gaining much attention. He served as the leader 
of the Nation of Islam and preached a militant 
version of black nationalism. 

Soon this attention proved detrimental, and 



Malcolm was suspended from the Black Muslim 
Movement. He began his own movement, the 
Organization of Afro-American Unity, and dur- 
ing the same year made a pilgrimage to Mecca. 

In Mecca, Malcolm was transformed once 
again. In a letter he sent to his wife and assistants, 
Malcolm revealed his conversion. 

"1 have been utterly speechless and spell- 
bound by the graciousness 1 see displayed all 
around me by people of all colors," he wrote. 

Upon his return from the Holy City, Malcolm 
began a new doctrine. No longer would he hate 
all white people but only those who were racist. 

Malcolm became tolerant of the idea of inte- 
grated cooperation among groups, aiming for 
progress in civil rights through the participation 
of other African Amerifani and progressive 
white organizations. 

Malcolm was assassinated on Feb. 21, 1965. 
Three members of the Nation of Islam were con- 
victed. According to Victor Wolfenstcin, 9 pro- 
fessor of political science, "There is rather sub- 
stantial evidence that governmental agencies 
were at least passively collusive. 

"They did nothing to prevent this tragic 
event," he said, adding that two of the three men 
who were imprisoned for the assassination were 
obviously innocent. 



D 



espite a young. death that occurred on 
the incline of his political career, 
Malcolm X is not a forgotten man. His 



memory is celebrated on a handful of web 
pages, in several documentaries and in a 
motion picture. 

In recent years, news of his daughter's alleged 
assassination attempts of Louis Farrakhan - 
which some claimed was a government setup - 
has made headlines. 

Malcolm's daughter Qubilah Shabazz alleged- 
ly planned to assassinate Farrakhan because she 
believed he was responsible for her father's 
death. 

Charges were dropped, however, when 
Shabazz agreed to a deal in which she would 
receive treatment for alcohol abuse and sign an 
affidavit accepting responsibility for her role in 
the assassination attempt. She maintained her 
innocence. 

Last year, Malcolm's wife Betty Shabazz was 
burned to death, and her 12-year old grandson - 
the son of Qubilah Shabazz - plead guilty to the 
crime. 

The teachings of all civil rights leaders have 
been called up recently as current issues such as 
affirmative action maintain a place in national 
discussion. After Malcolm's death, a return to 
his teachings occurred periodically throughout 
the following three decades. People bought 
copies of his autobiography by Alex Haley and 
anthologies of his speeches. 

According to Wolfenstein, Malcolm X 
became one of the spiritual leaders of the black 



Adidas logo 
once again 
favored _^ 
by students 



By Carol McKay 

Daily Bruin Staff 



See MALCOLM X, page 6 



Arts & Entertainment; 825-2538; News; 825-2795; Sports; 825-9851; Viewpoint;825-2216; Classified Line;825-2221; Classified Display; 206- 3060; Sales;825-2161 



1.^ 



It all started out with those 
striped flip-flops. Then came 
the snap away nylon pants 
and back packs. Shoe carri- 
ers, mini purses, parkas, T- 
shirts and, oh yeah, shoes. 

Adidas has made a come- 
back from the days of the 
Beastie Boys and Run DMC, 
onto the bodies of students 
across campus, flooding 
Bruin Walk and camoufiag- 
ing students in three white 
stripes. Why is Adidas the 
unofficial uniform and 
leisure wear of choice? 

"Everybody wants to look 
like athletes. They're trying 
to emulate their heroes." 

Steve Scott 

Third-year 

Business economia 

"It is really popular. 1 
think it's definitely a status 
symbol because Adidas is so 
much more expensive than 
the other brands of sports 
wear. It's like the cool way to 
dress down." 

Christine Yeoh 

First-year graduate student 

Public policy 

"It's because of Jonathan 

Davis He's the lead singer of 

Korn, and he's the one who 

started the trend. It's all rock 

n' roll." 

Jesse Brown 

Fourth-year 

■ '^ Political sdence 

"That's a good question. 1 
think it's probably because of 
the popularity of hip-hop 
music and urban culture." 

David Ngo 

Second-year 

Communication studies 

"If you see athletes wear- 
ing them, you associate the 
clothes with the athlete. If 
you want to be like them, 
that's what you wear. My 
whole uniform for rowing is 
Adidas, so I have to wear it." 
Paul Steinke 
First-year 
Political sdence 

"I think it has the best 
designs. Nike is too out there. 
Their shoes are so ugly." 

Jcnn({f r Mauna 

Second-year 

Biology 

"People are looking for an 
alternative to Nike and 
Reebok. That's where brands 
like Adidas and Fila are com- 
ing from. They have pretty 
much the same designs, but 
Adidas brings back the old 
school." 

DonaM lee 

Fifth-year 

History 



'*^'. 



Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin News 



^ 



MALCOLM X 



From page 5 

radical and revolutionary movement, 
and his philosophies had a significant 
influence on the development of the 
Black Panther Party in the late 1960s. 

Malcolm's influences lessened 
through the '70s and '80s, 
Wolfenstein said, and were revit^ized 
during the late I980's, when "hip-hop 
artists and young black people more 
generally began to respond to the 
teachings of Minister Louis 
Farrakhan, who had revived the 
Nation of Islam." 

When Spike Lee directed 
"Malcolm X" in 1992, a new genera- 
tion discovered his life and impact on 
society. 

Paraphenilia was circulated within 
the popular culture, with "X" baseball 
caps at the forefront of the very visi- 
ble trend. 

Despite the passing fad's promo- 
tion of self-identity, history professor 



Robert Hill said that the emergence 
of Malcolm X hats and posters wasn't 
much more than capitalist-driven. 

"His importance transcends any 
kind of fashion or fad, as any struggle 
for freedom does," Hill said. "It's 
something that goes much deeper 
than that." 

Some students agree that Malcolm 
has personally influenced their own 
lives as well. 

"I know that if I had never been 
exposed to his teachings, I'd still be 
sitting around and hoping," said 
Sarah Abdelhamid, a second-year 
psychology and African American 
studies student. 

Abdelhamid said that the message 
she most values from Malcolm's 
philosophies is the importance of self- 
assertion. 

"The racism in our society is not as 
overt as it was during his time," she 
said. "But his philosophies said that 
you can't take anything passively. 
Today, we can rally for and against 
things like Prop. 209 and affirmative 



action. We have to take the initiative if 
we want things to change." 

However long ago Malcolm's 
efforts began, many believe that his 
legacy continues to apply. 

"His basi(j stance of militant oppo- 
sition to white racism remains rele- 
vant, all the more so in a time when 
there are massive efforts underway to 
roll back the gains of the 1960s free- 
dom struggle," said Wolfenstein, who 
teaches a course in Malcolm X and 
Black Liberation 

"The. attack on affirmative action 
is just one prong of this reactionary 
movement." 

Malcolm's teachings have contin- 
ued to influence generations of 
Americans. According to Hill, 
Malcolm is responsible for many of 
our modern ideas about African 
American empowerment. 

And not only has he influenced 
African American philosophy, but his 
ideas have penetrated alj of the 
American identity. 

"Through Malcolm X, we are now 



able to talk about institutional racism 
as well as individual prejudice," Hill 
said. 

In his last years, Malcolm formu- 
lated the idea of organized discrimi- 
nation and institutional responsibility, 
bringing the issue from an incident- 
based one to a community problem. 

"This meant that it wasn't just an 
individual matter," Hill said. "It was 
endemic to society." 

Malcolm's notions qf community 
empowerment and personal struggle 
have also changed the face of societal 
solutions. 

"His concepts of black self-deter- 
mination as a domestic program 
(brought about) economic and social 
programs that talked about communi- 
ty empowerment and political power, 
police accountability and community 
control of schools," Hill said. 

Hill credits Malcolm as articulat- 
ing the vision that self-determination 
for African Americans meant devel- 
opment of their community and 
achieving political power for anything 



t© change. ^ 

Malcolm emphasized "community-, 
based consciousness," Hill said, 
adding that a number of African 
American mayors appeared with the 
help of his movement. 

Abdelhamid does, however, find 
faults with some of his ways. "I don't 
advocate his ways of violence. I think 
there has to be another way," she said. 
"But I admire his ability to assert 
African Americans as people in an 
equal society." 

Abdelhamid said that she admires 
him for his ability to change as well. 
"It's sad that it took him a trip to jail 
to realize that something was wrong 
in his life. But he made the conscious 
decision to follow the right path, and I 
admire him for that." 

And the need for his influence 
remains. 

"Malcolm's spirit of black self- 
affirmation and uncompromising 
opposition to the oppression of his 
people is needed as much now as it 
ever was," Wolfenstein said. 



MANAGED CARE 

From page 3 

work. 

"(Managed care has) essentially 
required us to add an additional hos- 
pital for primary care, and therefore 
led to our acquisition of the Santa 
Monica hospital," Levey said. 

These changes have removed the 
perception that UCLA is an isolated 
institution. 

"All of these developments, which 
have stemmed from a managed care 
environment, have been very positive 
for UCLA. It has given UCLA a com- 
munity presence which we never had 
before." Levey said. 

According to UCLA officials, man- 
aged care, while not flawless, has cre- 
ated a greater level of awareness 
regarding what hospitals need to do to 
cut cost and maintain quality care. 

"TTiere is now a greater level of 
awareness of managed care and how 
medicine can benefit from it. 
(However) it is not without its prob- 
lems and it certainly represents a 



change that is difficult to make." 
Flynn said. 

Opponents complained that man- 
aged care programs are inaccessible to 
all patients and that the quality of care 
is dwindling, placing cost over care. 

"On the negative side I worry, as 
many do, whether managed care will 
remove the ability of patients to have 
mobility in the system," Levey said. 

"I also have concerns that individu- 
als will not have access to the latest 
medical advances, which are often 
very costly," Levey said. 

"Everyone should have access to 
the latest developments in medical 
technology, diagnosis and therapeu- 
tics." he continued. 

Institutions like UCLA are begin- 
ning to measure how well managed 
care is working. 

"We are expanding the number of 
managed care contracts we have, and 
have been increasing the number of 
members we see in both the 
Westwood and Santa Monica hospi- 
tals." Rynn said. 

"We are expanding the number of 
contracts we have," she added, "so 



that we can make this available to 
more people, so that everyone will 
have the opportunity and choice to 
have UCLA as their provider." 

"Managed care ... makes it easier to 
measure the quality of care, although 
quality and outcome measurement is 
in its early stages of development," 
Flynn said. 

"By critically analyzing what we 
are doing, we can do it well and effi- 
ciently," Karpf said. 

According to Karpf, managed care 
programs allow doctors and adminis- 
trators to measure the outcomes of 
patient care more than the previous 
fee for service systeth. 

"(Managed care) is a system that 
needs to be implemented and better 
understood," said Josie Rice, adminis- 
trator with UCLA Managed Care 
programs. 

"It's not a bad system. However, 
it's like any other program. It just 
needs time to develop." she added. 

"Managed care is not disappear- 
ing." Karpf said. "It will be made a lit- 
tle bit more flexible, but fundamental- 
ly it is not going away." 



SPILL 



From page 3 

the alarms, shut off other automated 
processes that use caustic gases, and 
notified the fire department of the 
situation. 

"The protection devices worked 
perfectly," 
Ceser said. ,^^^_^^^^__ 

There was 
also a comput- 
erized com- 
mand center, 
located in an 
area adjacent 
to Boelter, 
from which 

HazMat team 

members could 

safely observe what was going on 

inside the building on closed-circuit 

televisions. 

"That process is also automated, 
and it went perfectly as well," Ceser 
said. 

The Nano lab, where the spill 
occurred, is home to research and 



Proper safety 

procedures can pay off 

in the event of an 

accident. 



education in the areas of microfabri- 
cation, micromachining and inte- 
grated circuit fabrication. "" 

The lab's ventilation system is 
independent of the rest of the build- 
ing, so any gases released by the spill 
did not circulate throughout the rest 
of the building. 

In addition, the chemicals stored 
in the lab had 
^ been segregat- 
ed by compati- 
bility, meaning 
that the chemi- 
cals that would 
react violently 
when mixed 
were stored 
separate from 

each other. In 

the event of an 
accident, there would be less chance 
of a reaction. 

Ceser said that this incident serves 
to show the UCLA community that 
proper safety procedures can pay off 
in the event of an accident. 

"When you go that extra mile, 
things come out a lot better," he said. 



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Daily Bruin N«ws 



Friday, February 20, 1998 



7 



WORLD & NATION 




Dow Jones Industrials 

down: 75.48 
close: 8375.58 



NasdMi Indei 

down: 2.22 
close:535.01 



DolUr 

Yen: 126.16 
Mark: 1.8172 



More U.S. tr 



fit 



arrive in Middle East to bolster presence 




he Associated Piess 



U.S. Army soldiers of the 3rd Infantry Division based at Fort Stewart, Ga, are greeted as 
tliey arrive at a Kuwait City air base Thursday. 



IRAQ: While Kofi Annan seeks 
diplomatic solution in Baghdad, 
United Slates prepares for worst 



By Larry Kaplow . 

Cox News Service 

CAMP DOHA ARMY BASE, Kuwait'^ 
The first of several thousand troops arrived to 
beef up the U.S. military presence, picking up 
equipment - from duffel bags to tanks - and 
speculating about chemical weapons and Iraqi 
President Saddam Hussein. .• -^ 

Though their mission is defined as a training ' 
exercise, they know that their presence in the 
region is meant to deter an Iraqi invasion and 
reassure American allies. 

Many of the 384 arrivals from the 3rd 
Infantry Division at Fort Stewart, Ga., were 
groggy after a 17-hour flight on their chartered 
747 airliner. But, as they gathered for food and 
supplies, most knew they would be headed to 
the Kuwaiti desert within a day. 

"You know that only a few dozen kilometers 
away is a country that has aggressed in the 
past," said tank commander First Lt. Mark 



Walters. "It makes it a little more real. It raises 
what we call the 'Pucker Factor.'" 

Walters, of Warren, Penn., stood next to one 
of the 65-ton, $2.4 million tanks that he would 
soon lead into the desert. 

Many of the tanks and much of the other 
equipment on this base were used in Operation 
Desert Storm, which, in 1991, drove the Iraqis 
out of their occupation of Kuwait. 

Since that war. United Nations sanctions 
and weapons inspections have kept the Iraqi 
government largely in check. But the United 
States has begun, in earnest, a new military 
build-up after repeated attempts by Hussein to 
clos€ off from inspection areas where he is sus- 
pected of hiding chemical and biological 
weapons of mass destruction - which he has 
used in the past. 

With U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan 
headed to Baghdad this weekend for what 
many consider the last chance at a peaceful res- 
olution to the stand-off, the troops were com- 
ing from Fort Stewart to bolster the 25,000 
U.S. servicemen and women already in the 
Gulf region. 

By the end of the day Thursday, another 380 

See TROOPS, page 8 



North seeks reconciliation 
with former countrymen 



KOREA: Offer seen as 
Step in right direction 
by leadership of South 



By Paul Shin 

The Associated Press 

SEOUL, South Korea - North 
Korea appealed directly to dozens 
of political leaders in rival South 
Korea, asking them to help bring 
reconciliation to the divided 
Korean peninsula. 

It was part of a marked shift in 
policy and a remarkable peace 
overture by isolated North Korea, 
which declared Wednesday it was 
ready to talk with the South's newly 
elected government in the interest 
of ending decades of confrontation. 

Today, North Korea delivered 
70 letters addressed to South 
Korean leaders urging them to 
work toward reconciliation. The let- 
ters were received through the bor- 
der village of Panmunjom and are 



still being delivered. 

"We make clear that we are will- 
ing to have dialogue and negotia- 
tion with anyone in South Korea, 
including political parties and orga- 
nizations," Kim Yong Sun, a top 
North Korean policymaker, told 
the North's ofTicial Korean Central 
News Agency. 

"The north and the south must 
promote coexistence, co-prosperi- 
ty, common interests, mutual col- 
laboration and unity between fel- 
low countrymen," Kim was quoted 
as saying. 

Kim, regarded as a close confi- 
dant of leader Kim Jong II, spelled 
out the North's new position in a 
report to a meeting Wednesday of 
the country's major political parties 
and organizations, the North 
Korean news agency said. 

In South Korea, President-elect 
Kim Dae-jung's party, the National 
Congress for New Politics, wel- 
comed the North Korean move, 
calling it "a sign of change in the 
North's attitude." 



Accusations cloud power plant's future 



LAWSUrr: Electric station 
charged with polluting 
air near Grand Canyon 



ByMkfMlleRushlo 

The Associated Press 

PHOENIX - The Mohave 
Generating Station produces electrici- 
ty for millions of homes in the 
Southwest, but a conservation group 
says the plant also prcxiuces tons of 
pollution that clouds the view of the 
Grand Canyon and violates federal 
regulations. 

The Grand Canyon Trust sued the 
operators of the plant, which include 
utility companies in California, 
Nevada and Arizona, asking a Las 
Vegas federal court to make them 
clean up the plant. 

"This plant sits there and operates 
year after year dumping 40,000 tons of 
pollution into the air. They should join 
the rest of the U.S. We started to clean 
up our cars 25 years ago. That plant is 
being operated exactly as it was in 
1973," said Rick Moore, air quality 
program manager for the Flagstaff, 
Ariz.-based trust. 

The Mohave Generating Station, 
which is located along the Colorado 



River in Laughlin, Nev., is the largest 
uncontrolled source of sulfur dioxide 
in the Southwest. Sulfur dioxide, while 
invisible when emitted, joins other 
chemicals in the air to create sulfates. 

Sulfates are blown 60 miles west to 
the Grand Canyon in the summer, 
obstructing the view of the canyon, 
said Carl Bowman, the air quality coor- 
dinator for Grand Canyon National 
Park. 

He said the Environmental 
Protection Agency is still trying to fig- 
ure how much Mohave affects the 
greyish blue shroud over the park, but 
the plant is the largest single contribu- 
tor to the problem. 

The of)erators of the plant, however, 
contend Mohave does not have a visi- 
ble effect on the canyon. 

Nader Monsour, environmental 
regulation manager for Southern 
California Edison, the chief operator 
of the plant, said Mohave is in compli- 
ance with the Clean Air Act. 

He said the plant, which supplies 
power to about 1.7 million homes, does 
not significantly affect the environ- 
ment. All the power plants in the area 
combined reduce the canyon visibility 
by 6 percent, Monsour said, and it 
takes a 10 percent change before it is 
visible to the naked eye. 

Besides, operators argue that it 



could cost $200 million to clean up the 
generating station. 

Monsour said the plant can proba- 
bly continue to make a profit even 
when electricity competition is intro- 
duced, but being forced to retrofit the 
plant with scrubbers or otherwise clean^ 
up the plant could push the production 
cost up 30 or 40 percent, he said. 

It could mean the plant would have 
to close, Monsour said. 

That has the Navajo Nation and the 
Hopi Tribe concerned. They produce 
the coal slurry that is pipelined 275 
miles to the generating station, and 
both tribes earn a large portion of their 
revenue from the coal. 

For the Navajo Nation, about 15 
percent of its general fund money 
comes directly from the Mohave plant. 
It also provides about 350 jobs on the 
reservation. ^ = ^— 

Ray Baldwin Louis, a spokesman 
for the Navajo Council, said the tribe is 
very concerned about the effect the 
lawsuit might have on the generating 
station. 

"I don't think those issues with envi- 
ronmental impact is that significant for 
the Navajo Nation. We don't buy that 
it's affecting our environment, but the 
revenues that do come into the nation 
will be greatly affected (if the plant is 
closed)," he said. 



WORLD & NATION BRIEFS 



Death row dog gets 
second chance at life 

KANAB, Utah - Spared from death row 
in Oregon, Nadas the dog frolicked Thursday 
in his new animal sanctuary home, where he 
charmed his handlers and looked like any- 
thing but a hardened, horse-chasing criminal. 

The rambunctious collie-malamute mix 
had been sentenced to die in 1996 for chasing 
a neighbor's horse, violating an Oregon law 
that makes it a capital crime for dogs that kill, 
injure or even chase livestock. 

A groundswell of support from around the 
world prompted officials in Medford, Ore., 
last week to commute the death sentence if 
Nadas would be neutered and sent to an out- 
of-state sanctuary for the rest of his life. 

After a 17-hour Hight to Las Vegas and a 3 
1/2 hour drive in the back seat of a sport util- 
ity vehicle, Nadas arrived before dawn 
Thursday^ at the Best Friends Animal 
Sanctuary. The 200-acre preserve is home to 



some 1,500 dogs, cats, birds, hors- 
es, rabbits and other livestock. 

Rescue of beached 
whales delayed 

HOBART, Australia - Strong waves 
stalled attempts Thursday to rescue 35 sperm 
whales stranded on a beach in Australia. 

The pod is the second in less than three 
weeks to get stuck on the island state of 
Tasmania. 

The whales beached themselves at 
Marrawah, on the northwestern tip of 
Tasmania, state parks and wildlife service 
biologist Hans Wapstra said. 

High seas, whipped by winds gusting 
above 50 knots, made the attempt too haz- 
'^ ardous Thursday night, rangers said. 

Rangers will try to keep the whales com- 
fortable on the beach overnight in hopes a 
rescue operation can be mounted today. 
Coles said. 




Earlier this month, 65 sperm 
whales were stranded at Ocean 
Beach, midway down Tasmania's 
west coast. Only three of them sur- 
vived after a huge rescue effort lasting 
several days. 

Cosmonauts return 
home from Mir station 

MOSCOW - Two Russian cosmonauts and 
a French astronaut left Mir and touched down 
in the snow-covered plains of Central Asia 
today, wrapping up a successful mission on the 
12th anniversary of the space station's launch. 

Cosmoniruts Anatoly Solovyov and Pavel 
Vinogradov and Frenchman Leopold Eyharts 
landed shortly after noon m the empty steppe o'i 
central Kazakstan. oft'icials at Mission Control 
said. It took the crew three hours to descend 
from the Mir, 250 miles above Earth. 

All went well, though space officials were 
worried beforehand about a blizzard that raged 



through the republic through early today. The 
weather improved shortly before the landing. 

The two Russians arrived on Mir last August 
when the troubled space station was hobbled by 
a number of breakdowns, including a reduced 
power supply. 

But Solovyov and Vinogradov performed 
several successful repair missions. The station is 
now back at close to full power and has not had 
any major problems in recent months. 

Mir was launched on Feb. 19, 1986. and was 
expected to remain in operation for only five 
years. A series of near di.sasters last year, includ- 
ing a fire, computer breakdowns and a collision 
with a cargo ship, raised doubts about Mir's 
safety 

But Russian space olTicials want to keep the 
spacecraft manned at least until next year, when 
a new international space station is put aloft. 

Russians Talgat Musabayev and Nikolai 
Budarin and American Andrew ITiomas remain 
aboard Mir. . 

Compiled from Daily Bruin wire reports. 



8 Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin News 



STATE & LOCAL 



Officials don't evict camping protesters 



ENVIRONMENT: Demonstrators 
try to stop soil tests at site of 
proposed nuclear waste dump 



By Larry G«iber 

The Associated Press 

NEEDLES, Calif. — Federal rangers 
made no move Thursday to evict dozens of 
American Indians and environmentalists 
from a desert camp where they are protest- 
ing the proposed Ward Valley nuclear waste 
dump. 

Although rangers in white vans kept 
watch from a mile away, the threat of evic- 
tions and mass arrests was put on hold indef- 
initely as officials of the federal Bureau of 
Land Management (BLM) talked with 
protest leaders in hopes of reaching a peace- 
ful solution to the week-old demonstration. 

"We're still negotiating with the tribe and 
as long as those negotiations continue there 
will be no significant law enforcement 
action," BLM spokeswoman Carole 
Levitzky said. 



The BLM gave eviction notice to the 
campers on Feb. 13, a day after the latest in 
a long series of demonstrators arrived. 

There have been as few as 20 and as many 
as 100 people at the camfvin 22 miles west of 
Needles, which is aimed at blocking soil tests 
on the site of the proposed dump. 

On Wednesday night, as federal visitors 
looked on, Barbara Antone poked a sharp 
stick into the ground beside a campfire. took 
two seeds out of a cloth bag and buried them 
in the hole. 

She was making a point: To her Quechan 
people, the seeds represent man and 
woman, sacred symbols of creation. 

With her palm, she tami:>ed the Indian 
corn kernels into the desert dirt at the feet of 
Ed Hastey, California head of the BLM. 

"That's where they will grow." she said. 

Hastey and a handful of colleagues made 
a brief appearance at the camp, where at 
least a token encampment has been in place 
since 1996. 

Hastey told tribal elders that he was sur- 
prised at their invitation and said he would 
keep talking with officials in Washington in 
hopes of working out a peaceful solution. 



"That's all I can guarantee you," he said. 

The dump site is on federal land that 
would be turned over to the state. Gov. Pete 
Wilson's administration has licensed dump 
operators to accept low-level waste from 
hospitals, laboratories and nuclear plants to 
be buried in unlined trenches. 

Opponents worry that radioactivity could 
seep into the water table and contaminate 
the Colorado River, 20 miles east. 

An alliance of five American Indian 
tribes from California and Arizona also say 
the dump would desecrate their homeland. 

The federal government has hesitated to 
sign over the land to the state government 
because of safety concerns. Federal experts 
want to use radioactive tritium to test the soil 
and say the encampment must be movdd. 

On Wednesday night, a half-dozen old 
women kept vigil around the campfire. 
Younger Indians patrolled the camp. 

"We will remain until we find out what's 
going to happen," said Barbara Antone's 
husband, Wally Antone. 

The campers said they would refuse to 
leave unless they are forced out in hand- 
cufi"s. 




The Associated Press 

(Left to right) Weldon Johnson Jr., Rodney Patch and 

Jack Fisher protest a proposed nuclear waste dump. 



BUSES 



From page 3 

Students are also complaining about 
the cramped seating these buses pro- 
vide. 

"While they are more comfortable 
than the older buses, they hold fewer 
people and when it gets crowded, they 
are more uncomfortable," said 
Khalisha Banks, a third-year political 
science student. 

Despite these complaints, UCLA 
Transportation Services has received 
a>mpliments for the lessened environ- 
mental impact of these buses. 

"We have received very positive, 
environmental-type comments. I have 



heard a lot of comments in reference to 
the clean-burning fuel, in that there is 
no longer a diesel smell," said Lewis. 

Among the benefits these buses pro- 
vide are low emissions caused by clean- 
burning fuel and reduced operating 
costs. 

While no statistics are available to 
determine the reduction in emissions, 
comparable bus lines state that a fleet 
this size reduces pollutant emission by 
approximately 1.500 pounds per year. 

"WeYe very proud to have a fleet of 
environmentally friendly and clean- 
burning vehicles here." Lewis said. 

"We feel that's our contribution to 
UCLA, this is our environment and 
our community, and we feel it's our 
responsibility to do that," she said. 



TROOPS 



From page 7 

had arrived, with several thousand 
more expected from Georgia over 
the next week. 

The United States already has 
tanks, artillery and missile launch- 
ers outside the Kuwaiti capital, as 
part of a defense agreement signed 
after the Gulf War. 

The troops will train like normal, 
firing weapons, maneuvering in the 
desert and keeping trucks, comput- 
ers and radios working. Bui this 
training mission came up on just a 
few days notice and is for an indefi- 
nite period. 



As part of their regular training, 
they are equipped with masks and 
protection from chemical and bio- 
logical weapons. 

"You've got to think about that. 
That's all they talk about," said 
Jason Christensen, 20, a computer 
and night-vision goggles technician 
from Irvine, Calif. "Right now, 
we're just training, so if anything 
happens we'll be prepared." 

Many of them have trained in 
deserts before - either in Egypt or 
California - but most were in for a 
new experience in new terrain. 

"Until you're here, you've never 
seen anything likejhis in your life," 
said First Lt. Deshawn Brown, 25, 
who came from her base at Fort 



Hood, Texas, six weeks ago. "You 
see camels, you see sheep when 
you're driving down the road." 

Brown, originally from 
Hemingway, S.C, said she feels she 
is here to help protect Kuwaitis 
from a dangerous Hussein. 

"I can't even imagine how these 
people felt in 1991, when someone 
came over the border and just took 
their country," she said. "He is a 
man with nothing to lose, that's my 
only concern." 

Specialist Robert Huffman, a 30- 
year-old mechanic who was sent to 
Saudi Arabia during the Persian 
Gulf War, said he had advised his 
younger colleagues to be prepared 
for chemical attacks. 




Learn skills that will 

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Monday, February 23, 1998 6pm*118 Kerckhoff Hall, Conference Room For more Info x53305 



Daily Bruin News Friday, February 20, 1998 9 

4 m . : . -.' - ■ ^' "-■"■•.*■.'■-.. .- - ^ 



HOW^HE 



PLANETS 




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' February 21. 1998 

9am - 5pm 

doors open at 8: 15 

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A free 

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Tkis one day non-specialist talk is given ky a group or world 
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Tkis series is designed for tke general puklic, puklic officials, 
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9:00 am: Tke Eartk as a Dynamic System. Thomas H. Jordan MIT. 

9:40 am: Mountain Building: Its Effects on Climatic Cliange. T. Mark 
Harrison, UCLA. 

10:20 am: Eartk's Ice A^es, Ckaos Tkeory and Wkat Tkey Tell Us Akout 
ILOO am: Can We Predict Eartkquakes? Leon Knopoff, UCLA. 

L30 pm: Tke Origin of Eartk and Planets. George Wetkerill, Carnegie 

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2:50 pm: Meteor Impacts and tkeir Role in Skaping Planetary Evolution. 
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10 Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



VIEWPOINT 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



Fri<lay,Febnjary20,1998 11 



viewpoint@medid.ucla.edu 



Ute and cover'mis 

it is never too early to learn 



Student leaders have 
a lot of experience 
using rhetoric to cloud 
issues, shift attention 
away from themselves 

A few quarters ago, one of my 
artsy-fartsy North Campus- 
type classes was, ("or reasons 
beyond rhy grasp, conducted in a 
decidedly humanities-unfriendly 
classroom somewhere in the bowels 
of Young Hall - home to UCLA's 
department of chemistry. If memory 
serves, the class was a seminar on 
Goethe, Carew, Proust. Nabokov 
and Donne titled "Surname 
Mayhem," but that's not important. 
The most challenging aspect of the 
seminar was getting there and back 
alive. I would navigate through a 
labyrinth of seedy corridors where 
upon each door was plastered a 
warning of 
the immi- 
nent risk 
and mortal 
danger to 
which one 
entering 
would be 
automatical- 
ly exposed. 
Passing that 
rare open 
door, I 
would see a 
lone, nutty 

professor-type trying to turn the 
pages of his lab notebook while wear- 
ing armpit-length oven mitts, guz- 
zling some smoking, foul-looking 
solution straight from the beaker or 
just lying unconscious on the floor. 
As I wended my way down and back 
and forth for 10 weeks through that 
hellish complex, two thoughts were 
constantly in my mind: a) I didn't 
belong there, and b) a bunch of 
teenagers did. 

And so it goes in the little big 
league or big little league (depending 
on your perspective) that is higher 
education. We're not there yet. Bui 
we will be. Chemistry students will 
go on to be chemists, engineering 
students will go on to be engineers, 
and v.e English students will fanta- 
size on fmdmg Hemmgway's missing 
valise al one of the garage sales we 
frequent in search of a foxed and 
buckled but legible copy of the OED. 

Daugherty is a fourth-year English stu- 
dent E-mail him at daughert@ucla.edu. 




Midiael 
Daugherty 



Meanwhile, we will continue to be 
responsible for dipping slices of 
frozen potato into vats of boiling oil 
for an adventurous clientele that 
prefers dining behind the wheel of a 
moving vehicle. 

And what about our "student lead- 
ers" (an oxymoron if I've ever seen 
one)? Will the student politicians al 
USAC go on to become officials at 
some other acronym? It seems, based 
on what I've read lately, that they are 
certainly well qualified for positions 
in government. The "Career 
Objective" line of their collective 
resume would put a smile of Huey 
Long's corpse and reads like a 
Kenneth Starr wet dream; "1 deny 
ever taking part in violating cam- 
paign regulations, obfuscating, mak- 
ing blanket denials, slinging mud, 
avoiding the issue, self-aggrandizing, 
character assassinating, lying 
through my teeth, making reprisals, 
and taking credit for that which I 
have played no part," You're 
hired! 

Good news: Unlike so many other 
(more noble) fields of endeav- 
or suffering from an over- 
abundance of new ini 
liates and a dearth 
of positions for 
them to fill, poli- 
tics is (and will 
always be) ripe 
for the taking. In 
fact, there will 
never be a short- 
age of positions, 
postings, appointments 
and seats for newcomers to the 
elective sciences - that is. until _ 
the Earth runs out of the rocks 
under which they must, by neces- 
sity, retreat and reside. 

If you've been following 
USAC's most recent in a long list 
of shortcomings and controver- 
sies - the one some hebetudinous 
wannabe pundit has bothered to 
name "Campaigngate" - you 
have been bothered to know that 
one guy quit and accused the rest 
of doing bad things. The Bruin 
reported it. Some folks at USAC 
responded by saying bad things 
about the guy. The Bruin report- 
ed it. The guy responded with 
some convincing (not bul- 
letproof, but convincing) 
evidence supporting his 
initial accusations. The 
Bruin reported it. Then 
one of the USAC folks 
got all mad at the nasty 
Bruin for attempting to 
keep its readership up 
lo speed on the smear- 
fest. 



Before I go any further. I should, 
in fairness, admit (unabashedly) that 
I don't know very much about 
USAC or Students First!. 1 don't 
know who they are, and I don't know 
what they do. But then, I have no 
idea what elTect niacin or thiamin 
has on my metabolism; maybe I 
should. Kendra Fox-Davis, paid 
USAC functionary, wrote thai our 
current Students First! mutation of 
USAC has affected programs thai 
"benefit all students. " As I am loathe 
lo be an ungrateful beneficiary of 
others' good works, please, someont, 
let me know what USAC has done 
for me so I can express my gratitude. 
I must have beea absent on the day 
that the Campus Guide to Student 
Otnernmenl was distributed. 1 must 
have missed the lecture on USAC's 
influence on my education. Am I the 
only one? I'll bet dollars to dough- 
nuts that 99 percent of the people 




who read this don't know enough 
about USAC to tell you what the let- 
ters U-S-A-C stand for. Side note: 
I've come up with some amusing 
alternatives. Until now, it had never 
occurred to me how many unkind 
words start with the letter "C." I 
digress. -_ a. 

So, I don't know jack about 
USAC or Students First!; but being 
an English major and all. I have 
developed a fairly sensitive ear to 
malarkey. There's this really neat 
book I have called "A Handbook of 
Rhetorical Terms" by Richard 
Lanham. a professor of English at 
UCLA. It's not exactly bathroom 
reading, unless. I suppose, you have 
a dying need to know the meaning of 
"amphidiorthosis" while you are 
indisposed for reasons of a personal 
nature. It's a useful aid in giving a ' 
proper name to some common 
rhetorical techniques we more gener- 
ally refer to as "B.S." My intent hefe 
is to snatch a few quotes from recent 
Daily Bruin articles on 
"Campaigngate" (or "Weaselgate" 
as I will prefer to call it from 
this point forward), to 
demonstrate the 
rhetorical spilth 
that emanates 
from some mem- 
bers of our stu- 
dent government. 
By this measure, 
we will be well 
served in assess- 
ing how ready they 
are to enter big-league 
politics. 
We'll start with Max Espinoza. 
In an interview ("Chair resigns, 
citing 'corrupt' government," Jan. 
23), USAC Finance Committee 
Chair Robert Rhoan (the guy who 
resigned) "claims that Academic 
Affairs Commissioner Max 
Espinoza approached him and 
asked him to resign after Rhoan 
abstained from voting on a fund- 
ing request. Espinoza denied this. 
'It's not in my authority to ask 
anyone to resign,' he said." 
This technique is called 
"apoplanesis" which means, more 
or less, "answering a different 
question." Apoplanesis is to a 
politician what a hammer is to a 
carpenter. Jeffrey 
Dahmer could say "It's 
not in my authority to 
eat people." True 
statement. But 
whether or not 
he did is a differ- 
ent question. Did 
Espinoza ask 
Rhoan to resign? 



In computer science they'd say this 
question has a binary solution set; 
the answer is one of two things: 
"Yes" or "No." The bottom line is: 
somebody's telling a fib. What nice 
company they keep. 

Here's another one: Fox-Davis, in 
response to Rhoan's accusations, 
said, "I am personally disturbed by 
his allegations because he has never 
indicated to our council that he has 
had any concerns regarding the 
authenticity of our expense 
accounts." 

This is called "peristrophe," which 
means "converting an opponent's 
argument to one's own use." She's 
basically saying that she's bothered 
by the accusations because he didn't 
mention them sooner. Should we 
infer that she would not have been 
"personally disturbed" if he had 
mentioned the accusations immedi- 
ately? She apparently wants us to 
think that because he waited, his 
accusations are therefore somehow 
less valid. Rhoan ends up getting 
beaten over the head by his own cud- 
gel. Tricky stuff and a mainstay of 
modern political rhetoric. 

I have saved the best for last. In 
her letter to the Daily Bruin ("Time 
to investigate the investigators," Feb. 
17), Fox-Davis poorly projects an 
"argumentum ad misericordiam" (an 
appeal to the mercy of the hearers) 
on behalf of Daily Bruin contribut- 
ing reporter Dennis Lim. She seems 
to apologize for the fact that some 
Bruin reporters have no "formal 
journalistic training beyond writing 
for a high-school paper." And what 
formal training, might I ask, does 
Fox-Davis have for being "chief of 
stafT'? (Now I'm the one using peri- 
strophe.) She mentions twice in 14 
words that Lim is a "freshman" (isn't 
that word sexist and out of vogue?), 
thereby insinuating a lack of ability 
on his part. She says that whatever 
"prompted" the "attack" on Students 
First! "does not really matter." If so, 
why does she spend over 1 50 words 
hypothesizing on the issue? She 
attributes the parts of his reportage 
she doesn't like to his eagerness, 
stress, scrambling and a "desire for 
the spotlight." 

Lanham might call this "indigna- 
tio" (arousing the audience's scorn) 
or "argumentum ad hominem" (dis- 
paraging one's opponent's charac- 
ter), but let's skip the frou-froi/C 
Latinate labels and describe it in 
terms we all know: it's arrogant, it's 
condescending and it obscures the 
real issues. 

If Fox-Davis knows what goes on 

~ ''See DAUGHERTY, page 12 



Got something to say, but don't know where to say it? Be a 
Viewpoint columnist! Applications are now available in the 

Daily Bruin office, located in 1 18 Kerckhoff Hall. 
Applications are due Friday, Feb. 27 at 5 p.m. Late aplplica' 

tions will not be accepted! 



^'r'-^i'm.'r.sm^^i^mm^mi!. 



'.r'v 



— Racism in America 

Prejudices still run rampant across the nation. Next Friday, 
Viewpoint will explore racism as it exists today in America and on 
"/ campus. Share your thoughts. E-mail us at 

viewpoint@media.ucla.edu or bring your submissions to 

118 Kerckhoff Hall. 
The deadline is Wednesday, Feb. 25 at 4 p.m. 




America: Melting pot or salad bowl? Many analogies have been used to 
explain the interaction among America's myriad ethnic/racial groups. The 
goal of integrating into the mainstream is often tempered by a desire to 
maintain ethnic/racial uniqueness. This tension can precipitate the call for 
nationalisms. Can nationalisms peacefully co-exist in America, or are they 
mutually exclusive? Is patriotism really just ''loving America or leaving it?" 



Patriot declares 
individual rights 
key to greatness 
of US. way of life 

AMERICA: Giving every 
person special freedoms 
makes country unique 



— By Daniel Rego 



America. That word means so 
much to me. I believe in America 
and what it, above all other coun- 
tries, stands for: the sovereignty 
and freedom of the individual. But 
there are those who call this coun- 
try AmeriKKKa and this state 
KKKalifornia. They call me a devil, 
oppressor and murderer. They do 
not know the true essence of. 
America. 

This article is about that true 
essence. 

America is not a nation of any 
particular ethnic group. But some 
may attempt to fool you into think- 
ing that this is a country of 
W.A.S.P.'s (White Anglo-Saxon 
Protestants), and that everyone else 
is fooled, oppressed or a sell-out. I 
am not a W.A.S.P. I am not sell-out, 
I just believe in freedom. Those 
who viciously shout otherwise are 
most sincerely wrong. 

These individuals think only in 
the myopic view of racial classifica- 
tions. America is not a land of 
racial classifications. This may be 
why some hate it so much. This 
country is not a country of race, 
but of an idea - that of freedom 
and the right to pursue happiness, 
and to this end, the freedoms of 
life, liberty and property. 

America is not a country of 
socialism, for socialism is anathema 
to freedom. Many of those who cry 
"evil AmeriKKKa" believe in racial 
classification and delude others 
into following Nazi-esque patterns 
of racial rigidity. The racial whole 
does not delegate rights to individu- 
als, but individuals delegate power 
to the government. Rights do not 
vary from race to race, ethnicity to 
ethnicity - freedom is an invariable 
thing. 

We are all sovereign individuals 
who delegate some of our sover- 
eignty to both the federal govern- 
ment and to California. These are 
created to protect our inherent 
rights. Bearing that protection, we 
reserve the right to deal freely with 
others. That means that we work 
through mutual agreement with 
others. That is freedom; that is 
America. I believe in my freedom, 
and I believe in America. 

The problem that some have 
with this idea is that they view life 

See REGO, page 12 

Rego is a second-year pre-political sci- 
ence student. 




Race: blurred beyond recognition 



ENCLAVES: Grouping by 
race does not assure 
any sense of belonging 



ByCatieBailard 

Ethnic enclaves, hmmm ... you're 
kidding, right? Should the United 
States be divided into ethnic 
enclaves? That is the question, right? 
Wow, are you sure this isn't the show 
platform for a future Jerry Springer 
60-minute tirade of ignorance and 
idiocy? In fact, I seem to remember a 
Jerry episode that touched on this 
proposal. It was something along the 
lines of "Klanfrontation! When 
Racists Attack: Part 4!" 

OK, maybe I'm wrong. But you 
are catching my drift, yes? Now 
where should I begin with my own 
tirade? Let's start with the enclave 
part. No, we'll get back to that; let's 
start with what the Einsteins who sup- 
port this solution most likely believe 
the problem is: racial pride, racial s^ 
exclusion, and to sum it up - race. 
Not their own of course, but all those 
other pesky races that incessantly rear 

Bailard Is a second-year undeclared 
student. 



their multi-pigmented heads. All 
right, I have to admit that when the 
kids sitting next to me in lecture were 
drawing the flag of their country of 
origin on their body F>arts, followed 
by nationalistic slogans, I found 
myself growing a little perturbed. But 
you know what I did? This is revolu- 
tionary: I stopped myself, and I took 
a long look into the darker comers of 
my mind. You know the ones, where 
all those little, not-so-enlightened 
nuances skulk around in trench coats. 
And then I opened a window, and let 
me tell you ... the sunlight was refresh- 
ing. 

Boo hoo, my feelings are hurt ... 
they're in America, goddamnit. You 
know, America the beautiful, the 
melting pot and all that jazz. Hey, if 
they don't love it vhy don't they 
leave? Well, if they won't leave let's 
just divide up the country so we don't 
have to listen to all that cultural crap. 
I just hate feeling left out. So you stay 
on your side of the line and I will stay 
on mine. 

But the truth is, one of the few 
things I think America, Land of 
Hypocrites, has going for it is our 
unique mix of races and cultures. 
Often I have looked around my lec- 
tures and enjoyed the ethnic diversity 
of the students sitting around me. 



Where else in the in the world can you 
have the privilege of savoring the dis- 
parate beauties of so many different 
ethnicities in a space as small as a sin- 
gle lecture hall? How many countries 
can boast such a diversified list of well 
known authors including Toni 
Morrison, Amy Tan, Kate Chopin, 
Sandra Cisneros, Leslie Marmon 
Silko and John Steinbeck? Personally, 
I have taken a quasi-Aristotelian 
approach in my examination of vari- 
ous cultures, and there is not a single 
culture that I do not believe could 
teach me something of value. 

Don't get me wrong. I am not 
asserting that the racial atmosphere in 
the United States is picture perfect 
and tension-free. We all know this is 
far from the truth. The fact is that sep- 
aratists, zealots and paranoids aren't 
racially exclusive. This is a human 
vice, not a racial one. In fact, anyone 
who has taken Anthropology 7 knows 
that the concept of race cannot be 
genetically identified. Each race has 
within it such diversity it is impossible 
to find a DNA standard from which 
to categorize races. Race is cultural; 
race is how you were raised. I don't 
know about you, but I know that cul- 
turally, I identify myself more closely 
with my American-raised Colombian 
roommate than I do with the 



Australian who lived downstairs, or 
than I do with the pig farmers I visit- 
ed in Nebraska. So if you go with that 
whole ethnic enclave plan, I would 
reajly like to know where you are 
planning to put me. 

The fact is, if you feel like getting 
back to your roots and enjoying the 
company of your own culture, you're 
in luck. There are places each of you 
can go^ But the great part about this 
country is that if you feel like delving 
into a culture other than your own, 
you can do that too. You can take an 
Asian-American history class, attend 
a reggae festival, go to a powwow, 
watch a gay and lesbian pride parade, 
study Buddhism, visit a Cinco de 
Mayo celebration, and you can 
always attend a Phish concert to 
name just a few ways. 

The beautiful part is that we are 
pretty much free to expose ourselves 
to as many, or as few of these various 
expressions of culture as we want. 
Sure, there may be a few people who 
give you dirty looks to bring attention 
to the fact that you're on their turf, 
but there will also be many who do 
not, and there will also be those who 
appreciate your attendance and inter- 
est. 

See BAILARD, page 13 



DAILY BRUIN 



118 Kerckhoff Hall 

308 We St wood Plaza 

Los Angeles, CA 90024 

(310)825-9898 

http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



Edina Lcfcovic 

Editor in Chief 
Matthew Schmid 

Managing Editor 
J.Jtoni Palm«r 

Viewpoint Editor 
Christopher Bates 

Staff Repreientative 
Stanley L. Johnson Jr. 

Sporti Editor 



Cheryl Klein 

Arts ti Entertainment Editor 
Diana Lee 

f^oducflon Editor 
Hannah Miller 

News Editor 
Kim Stone 

Electror>ic Media Director 
Aaron Tout 

Phoro Editor 



"Unsigned editorials represent a 
majority opinion of the Daily Bruin 
Editorial Board. All other columns, 
letters and artworli represent the 
opinions of their authors. 

All submitted material must 
bear the author's name, address, 
telephone number, registration 
number or afTtliation with UCLA. 
Names will not be withheld except 
in extreme cases. 



The Bruin complies with the 
Communication Board's policy 
prohibiting the publication of 
articles that perpetuate deroga- 
tory cultural or ethnic stereo- 
types. 

When multiple authors sub- 
mit material, some names may be 
kept on file rather than pub- 
lished with the material. The 
Bruin reserves the right to edit 



submitted material and to deter- 
mine its placement in the paper. 
All submissions become the 
property of The Bruin. The 
Communications Board has a 
media grievance procedure for 
resolving complaints against any 
of its publications. For a copy of 
the complete procedure, contact 
the Publications office at 118 
Kerckhoff Hall. 



\ 



X 



Y 



12 Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



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mail: haU@ess.ucla.edu). 








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REGO 



From page 11 

only through the concept of racial 
diversity classifications, forgetting 
that individuals are diverse. Racial 
classifications are only words. 
America stands for the diversity of 
the individual. These views of ^ 
"nationalism" are absurd. It 
assumes that individuals are noth- 
ing more then representatives of a 
racial stereotype. "Peoples" are not 
sovereign, but are only a artificial 
classification thrust on others. One. 
is an American by choice. One does 
not claim a homeland by race or 
ethnicity but by truly being a part 
of that home. 

Patriotism in America is about 
the love of freedom. Nationalism is 
of racial division and necessarily 
racism, for separate is inherently 
unequal. 

When did I become a patriot? 
Quite simply, I visited another 
country and saw the alternative. 
This was not a "third-world" coun- 
try or a developing nation. This 
country was England (that place 
filled with "Anglos"). 

There, I saw the insanity of 
socialism, in ways both subtle and 
glaring. It was then that I realized 
freedoms that are sacred here are 
trounced upon in the name of ' 

socialism and "the people;" it was 
then that I realized what America 
really stands for. True, the people 
running it have riot always shared 
this view and have often worked 
against it, but this country and 
what it stands for cannot be sullied 
by evil men who may run it. 

I am a patriot. I love my free- 
dom. I love my sovereignty. I am 
not a nationalist - I do not believe 
in race. In virtually any other coun- 
try, never has the individual been 
placed over the alleged collective 
whole (usually demagogues and 
proto-bureaucrats controlling peo- 
ple). 

I am an individual. Because I 
realize that this country stands for 
freedom - my freedom and every- 
one's freedom - I salute the flag of 
both America and of California. 
Because of this, I work to make this 
country and state more free from 
the hands of tyranny. I am a patriot 
- always - for freedom. 



DAUGHERTY 



From page 10 

in Lim's mind, she must be clairvoy- 
ant. Well then, lefs ask her to peer 
into her scry andtell us who made 
all those telephone calls on our 
dime? (She steers far clear of that 
issue in her letter.) Let's ask her why 
random students received campaign 
calls from Students First!? Let's ask 
her why the "second invoice" looks 
like it's been fussed with? (See for 
yourself The invoices are posted in 
the Bruin Archives web page.) What 
a pity that someone's need to cover 
her fellow Student»First! pals would 
supersede their obligation to the 
people who put her there in the first 
place. 

The fact that she is willing to dis- 
parage an earnest, hard working 
(unpaid, 1 might add) reporter to 
suit the needs of her party is further 
testament to her suitability for future 
employment in the offices of other 
self-serving public servants. I could 
go on for days with other examples, 
but I think *ve get the point. Perhaps 
they should start calling themselves 
Student Leaders First! 

For what it's worth, I have 
scoured all the articles associated 
with Wea.selgate (the scandal for- 
merly known as "Campaigngate"), 
and as far as I can tell, the Daily 
Bruin's news department didn't go 
outside of the nominal bounds of 
journalist integrity. Lest you think 
my opinion on the matter is invalid 

^eeMU6HERTY.page13 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



Friday, February 20, 1^8 13 



DAUGHERTY 



From page 1 2 



because I am a Daily Bruin 
Viewpoint columnist, let me assure 
you otherwise: 1 have written against 
The Bruin before and 1 wouldn't hes- 
itate to do it again if I saw any such 
indiscretion or opportunity. 

I know you're very busy, but if 
any of this interests you at all, go to 
The Bruin's web page and read the 
articles yourself Then read Fox- 
Davis's letter. Find the contradic- 
tions, suss out the manipulative 
phrases, cheese-ball rhetorical trick- 
ery and innuendo. It's kinda' slick, 
in a sophomoric kinda' way. See for 
yourself how our student leadership 
scurries around damning allega- 
tions. 

In closing, you might be asking 
where I get oft disparaging our fine 
young crop of student leaders and 
their entourage. I'll tell you where. 
Right here. Right here in The Bruin. 
Love it or hate it, it's the community 
voice of this campus. It's exception- 
ally accessible to anyone in our com- 
munity who has a point to make and 
needs a place to make it. It may be 
just a throwaway, but it's our throw- 
away. 

Perhaps, I have been naive in 
thinking that all the evil crud associ- 
ated with politics doesn't happen 
until the stakes get a lot higher. 1 
stand corrected. Maybe that odd 
stench wasn't coming from Young 
Hall after all. 



BAILARD 



From page 1 1 

So what if there are people who arc 
proud of their own cultures; why 
shouldn't they be? There is beauty in 
every culture, just as every culture has 
a few of its own skeleton-filled closets. 
As long as you are not being attacked, 
why feel threatened? Do you seriously 
believe that defining more lines and 
drawing more boundaries will really 
improve race relations in this country? 
Wasn't that the pretext that fueled the 
government's original treaties with the 
Native Americans which called for the 
creation of an "Indian Country" 
where all those "pesky, dangerous" 
natives could be segregated from the 
settlers? It may interest you to know 
that these treaties failed miserably, 
and when they did fail, the United 
States embarked on a brutal military 
campaign of genocide and forced 
removal. This was in the interest of 
preserving the peace, of course! 

Ethnic enclaves already exist in 
America, and if you're interested in 
living in one, be my guest. 1 under- 
stand that {here are many who feel 
more comfortable living in an area 
where they are surrounded by their 
own culture, and to others it may 
seem natural, and yet to others it is a 
matter of where they ended up. There 
is nothing wrong with this, if this is 
your choice. But I implore you not to 
make these choices for everyone else. 
It might be shocking, but not every- 
one may feel the same way as you. 

If you are really afraid of being 
offended, of not being accepted by 
everyone you meet, or if you are 
angered that not everyone around you 
looks and acts just like you, by all 
means take refuge in an enclave of 
your associates. But much to your dis- 
may, I assure you that this enclave will 
not consist of a single skin color or a 
single culture. It will be a conglomer- 
ate of narrow-minded, ethnocentric, 
suspicious, ignorant souls whose skin 
may not look like yours, but whose 
neuroses do. 

And seriously, if this ethnic enclave 
thing ever does come about do you 
really think you'll have an easy time 
finding a decent burrito, or udon for 
that matter, or fried rice or linguine? 
And don't forget those falafels, and I 
do love fry bread. Do you really want 
to get up in the morning and not have 
an English mufiln? C'mon, are you 
really willing to risk that? . ., 



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Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 




uiL^iui^[ei 



Leon Bates applies concentration 
and stamina to his careers 



Leon Bates will perform at UCLA's Schoenberg Hall on Saturday. 



UCLA Ceniet (or the Peffoiming Aits 



BySamToussi 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

When someone talks to concert pianist 
Leon Bates, the question invariably is 
asked: How much do you bench? 

Now why would anyone want to embar- 
rass a guy like that? Why would anyone 
want to prove that all concert pianists are 
scrawny, sickly little people who spent their 
entire childhood indoors? 

So how much does he bench? 

"Three-twenty," Bates says. 

No, really, how much do you bench? 

"Really. I bench three hundred and 
twenty pounds," Bates chuckles. 

Perhaps it would be fair to put Bates in a 
group of his own: a concert pianist who is 
also a bodybuilder. This combination may 
evoke memories of that 'Saturday Night 
Live' mock commercial: "It's a dessert top- 
ping. It's a floor w<ix. No, wait, it's both!" 
But to Bales the different facets of his life 
are not as irreconcilable as they first seem. 

On Saturday and Monday, Bates will 
show UCLA how he manages to play like 
Helfgott and look like the Hulk. On 
Saturday, he will perform works by 
Romantic composers such as Chopin and 
RachmaninolT. Then, on Monday, he will 
give a demonstration on the parallels 



between bodybuilding and piano playing. 

Raised in Germantown, Penn., Bates 
divided his time between playing sports 
with his friends and piano, violin and tuba 
lessons. In high school, he spent hours 
pumping iron at a local gym, all while play- 
ing in numerous concerts. 

Today, Bates plays with prestigious 
groups such as the New York 
Philharmonic Orchestra. And while some 
may view Bates as unconventional because 
he works out two hours a day, six days a 
week, Bates just looks at his regimen as 
part of who he is. 

"It was easy for me to come to body- 
building because of my participation in 
sports." Bates says. "1 grew up in what you 
say was a pretty average, middle-class 
upbringing and I grew up playing like any 
other kid in the neigh'oorhood. It was just 
coincidental that I was also a music enthu- 
siast." 

Yet as Bates became more heavily 
involved, with the piano and weights, he 
began to see parallels between the two and 
even ways each aspect of his life would ben- 
efit the other. 

"Both (the piano and bodybuilding) 
require a great deal of concentration and 

See BATES, page 19 



Nova Cafe is stellar getaway 



RESTAURANT: Sci-fi look, 
tasty food contribute to 
comfortable ambience 



By Terry Tang 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

A steaming cup of espresso. A thick 
slice of peppcroni pizza. Softly lit can- 
dles. A starry landscape. 

This is not a meal on the U.S.S. 
Enterprise. At the Nova Express Cafe, 
where space meets spice, the unique 
galaxy setting surprisingly adds to the 
coffeehouse atmosphere, complement- 
ing the whirring cappuccino maker 
and the rich aroma of Italian cuisine. 

Hidden on North Fairfax Avenue a 
few blocks away from the Miracle 
Mile, Nova Express has been on the 
map for more than five years. 
However, being outside of Westwood. 
the cafe is a well-kept secret which 
more students should share. 

At first glance. Nova Express 
appears like the typical coffeehouse. 
But through the door awaits a dark 
alien ambience. With only fluorescent 
orange lava lamps hanging from the 
ceiling and a candle on each table to 
light the way, the room carries an aura 
of intimacy, not fright The corner 
seats are the best in the seat-yourself 



restaurant - a couple or even a small 
group of friends can achieve a sense of 
privacy in a room full of other guests. 
Choose the round table if p>ossible. 

Similar to a conference table that 
you would find on the set "Star Trek," 
this five-seater has cushioned, reclining 
chairs. What more can you ask for 
after scarfing down a filling Earthling 
Sandwich and a double espresso? Also, 
the table strategically faces the make- 



RESTAURANT REVIEW 

Nova Express Cafe 

Address: 4261 

Los) 
Hours: Seven| 

5 p.! 

(213) ( 

Entre* Price Range: $1 .95-$6.35 
Grade: ••**T^ 

Thf Bruin rttn rnUufWts ImsmI on pnce, tfisUncr 
Mid cturMWr 




ERNEST LEE/Oaily Bruin 

shift cosmic scene of stars, random 
planets and other celestial bodies. 

The cafe enhances its lost-in-space 
decor with various objects scattered 
around the room. A toy robot perches 
on the coffee bar facing a wall plas- 
tered with sci-fi comic book covers 
from the past. Also, customers can 
browse through a shelf of used paper- 
backs of (you guessed it) science fiction 



and free local papers. 

But while the scene may appear 
alien, the food is not. 

Since Nova Express aims to be 
more of a coiTee shop than a restau- 
rant, the service may not be as atten- 
tive as a customer may like. Besides 
self-seating, menus should be picked 
up from the bar before the waiter's 
arrival at the table. Since the cafe spans 
one room, the same waiter serves 
everyone. Once the order has been 
served, it is up to the customer to ask 
for anything extra or ask for the bill. 

Aside from the usual cofTee bever- 
ages, biscotti and cookies. Nova 
Express serves an array of Italian food 
from "cosmic pizzas" to "celestial" sal- 
ads and sandwiches. The cafe provides 
a much wider variety than many other 
coffee joints. 

Appetizers range from chips and 
salsa to WafTles Fiesta - topped with 
fresh fruit and whipped cream and 
syrup. However, a very savory snack is 
the empanada ($2.25). These petite 
Argentinean pocket pies - the only 
non-Italian food on the menu - come 
with beef or spinach fillings. Piping 
hot, the seasoned beef snacks are a fla- 
vorful treat. However, considering its 
palm-size, one empanada docs not 
seem like enough for the price tag. 

Anyone who even mildly enjoys eat- 
ing pizza should sample a slice of the 




The Nova Express is a science-fiction-themed pizza caf6 in Hollywood. 



cosmic pizza combinations. The pizza 
menu ($1.95 to $3.50) emphasizes 
fresh ingredients, a made-from-scratch 
dough and the cafe's special tomato 
sauce. Instead of ordering one of The 
Classics (cheese, pepperoni and 
sausage), order the Light Ship ($2.75 
per slice). Besides being one of several 
vegetarian choices, this entree is crisp 
and wholesome. A homemade crust 
with freshly sliced tomatoes and basil, 
the pizza is both healthy and hearty. 
Although the crust is a bit on the 
crunchy side, it mixes with the sweet 
tomato sauce. One slice of Nova's 
pizza can go a long way in satisfying an 
appetite. The chef is very generous 
with portions and toppings. 

Another list of entrees to choose 



from are the "Nutrinos" Earthling 
Sandwiches ($3.35 to $6.35) which 
come with either a green salad or chips 
and salsa. Mostly hot items, the choic- 
es vary from ham and melted moz- 
zarella to turkey and avocado. 
However, the roasted eggplant with 
mozzarella leaves much to be desired. 
Even vegetarians may not enjoy this 
delicacy. In spite of the fresh Nova 
bread and steaming, stringy cheese, the 
eggplant is bland without any real fla- 
vor. 

As for the beverages, a lot of choices 
are available to cover different crav- 
ings. In the mood for a hot beverage? 
The espresso bar offers single and dou- 

See NOVA, page 19 



m' 



as both a pianist and a bodybuilder 



Dally Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



' -a:>-* .* 



- -: .- Friday, February 20, 1998 15 



"I Love You ... Don't Touch Mel" 
Directed by Julie Davis 
Starring Maria Schaffel, Mitchell 
Whitfield and Michael Harris 

Great, another movie devoted to sex, sex and 
more sex. You're probably thinking "Indecent 
Proposal," "Boogie Nights'%r "Threesome." 
But wait! Try a movie about, of all things, virgini- 
ty - the long and agonizing road of being a 25- 
year-old virgin in the '90s. 

It explains the film's unusual, but profoundly 
catchy title. "I Love You ... Don't Touch Me!" is 
a comedy about Katie (Schaffel), a young woman 
searching for her romantic ideal in the Los 
Angeles singles scene. Meanwhile, her best friend 
Ben (Whitfield), who is openly in love with her, 
must stand by and watch her fail for jerk after 
jerk. When she finally does think she's met Mr. 
Perfect (Harris), she realizes that Mr. Perfect 
doesn't necessarily mean Mr. Right. 

Throughout the movie, friends and family 
inundate her with unwanted advice about giving 
in to her sexual desires and giving up her ideals. 

"I Love You" is great at examining the life of 
an independent '90s woman who deals with the 
complex issues of sex every day. Especially since 
it seems like everyone is doing it, except for her. 

It also has some interesting dialogue with a 
number of memorable lines. For instance, in one 
scene when Katie is about to engage in casual 
sex, she stops and asks her apathetic partner, 
"Didn't your mother ever tell you, you are what 
you eat?" 

Great premise, great story, great dialogue ... 
now if only SchafTel wasn't so darn unlikable. 
Although she does a somewhat adequate job in 
acting, she fails to establish the necessary connec- 
tion with the audience to make them truly care 
about her character. Some of the dialogue, clever 
as it is, just doesn't seem right coming out of her 
mouth. And even to the untrained ear, in scenes 
when Schaffel, a veteran of Broadway musicals, 
must sing in a nightclub, there's nothing you can 
do but squirm in artistic (maybe even physical, 
mental and psychological) pain. 

But if you can get beyond Schaffel's mediocre ' 
performance, it's a great movie, well wortn see- 
ing. Too bad she's in every scene of the movie. 

Louise Chu 
Grade: B- 

"Senseless" ' • ' 

Directed by Penelope Spheerls 
Starring Marlon Wayans, David Spade 
and Matthew Lillard '^ 

At least the name of the movie is appropriate. 
After watching this new "comedy, " moviegoers 
may be wondering how sensible the filmmakers 




Maria Schaffel and 
Michael Harris star 
in "I Love You ...Don't 
Touch Me!" 



and actors were when they decided to sign on to 
this lame-o film. 

Wayans stars as Oarfyl Witherspoon, a dirt- 
poor business student who agrees to be a test sub- 
ject for a radical scientific experiment that will 
affect his senses of touch, taste, smell, sight an<j 
hearing. 

Soon, Darryl is realizing that his new super- 
senses have some advantages. He can ogle a girl's 
butt from a block away, he can hear conversa- 
tions from across a room, he can read a newspa- 
per from a mile away. Like all ambitious students 
would, Darryl takes advantage of these supernat- 
ural powers to cheat his way to a great job on 
Wall Street. So when he gets a little too depen- 
dent on the new drug and takes more than his 
usual dosage, his senses go out of control and 
wackiness ensues. 

While the story i| ridiculous, the jokes are 
gross and not funny. This comedy does have two 
things going for it though: some really cute 
actors. No, I'm not talking about Spade, that 
snide and overrated little bug who "very realisti- 
cally" plays the Big-Man-OnnCampus frat boy. 
No, the two young hotties in this movie are 
Wayans, the youngest and certainly the most 
attractive of his many brothers, and Matthew 
Lillard (the nutbar in "Scream") as his adorable 
multi-pierced roommate who mistakes Darryl's 
erratic behavior for heroin abuse. The friendship 
scenes between these two actors are the only 
bearable ones. 

Yet, despite their charm, the movie's insipid 
plot and tired jokes have sealed the movie's fate 



as a cheap video rental in a couple of years. Bui 
Wayans and Lillard are too good for this. 

Director Spheeris, who did such a wonderfully 
clever job with "Wayne's World," is just wasting 
her considerable talents here in relying so heavily 
on bathroom jokes and low-brow humor. Do we 
really need an extended scene of Darryl eaves- 
dropping on a girl having really bad diarrhea? Do 
we really need to see Darryl trying to lick the 
chest of a silicone-stufied bimbo? 

In this movie's frequently inane attempts to 
show the audience how silly it would be to lose 
one of your senses, the movie itself and why it 
was even made stand as the best example. It just 
doesn't make sense. 

AinrieePhan 
Grade: D-h 
"Dangerous Beauty" 
Directed by Marshall Herskovitz 
Starring Catherine McCormack and 
Rufus Sewell 

The title "Dangerous Beauty" sounds more 
like an NBC "Movie of the Week" than a seri- 
ous drama about 16th-century Renaissance 
Venice. To be truthful, if not for the elaborate 
sets and costumes that permeate the film, it 
could fit very well in the often shallow and 
empty world of network television cinema. 

Though director Herskovitz obviously has 
lofty goals for this tale of a non-conformist 
hooker, the film succeeds in doing little more 
than being moderately entertaining eye candy. 

It is fairly easy to get caught up in the skill- 
fully crafted visuals of the movie, but when it is 



all over, you II wonder ju.sl what it was you saw 
while you were in the theater. 

"Dangerous Beauty" stars McCormack 
(best known as Mel Gibson's wife in 
"Braveheart") as Veronica Franco, a lower- 
cla.ss girl who cannot marry the man she loves 
(Sewell) because he must marry according to 
his station. 

What's her solution? Why, to become a pros- 
titute or "courtesan" as they were known to 
Venitians at the time. We learn soon enough 
that courtesans are provided with more privi- 
leges and freedoms than wives during.this time 
period, and therefore were the most educated 
and artistic women in all of Italy. . > . < ' 

At this point, the viewer is forcedio wonder 
just what the filmmakers are trying to tell us. Is 
it that this barbaric society forced women to be 
sex slaves in order to acquire knowledge? That 
would make sense, if the movie wasn't so in 
love with its setting and all of its characters. It's 
difficult for the filmmakers to berate Venice 
when the costume designers and art directors 
did such a good job of making it look wonder- 
ful. 

The film's interpretation of Venice is so lav- 
ish and decorative that it's very hard to hold the 
city up to any serious criticism. The characters 
are all written as the typical charming, well-read 
Renaissance men, making it hard to hold them 
in contempt either. 

What the audience is left with is the image of 
this paternalistic society that commits many 
crimes against women, but is fairly benign in 
the long run. 

Also a detriment to the search for meaning 
in "Dangerous Beauty" is the film's lack of any 
sort of antagonist. This leaves the story with no 
momentum and no real point. We watth for 
two hours and have no idea what the movie is 
trying to tell us or what Veronica really wants. 

This is not to say it isn't a diversion for a 
couple of hours. The actors do well enough 
with the material, and there is some choice dia- 
logue that was obviously fun for the performers 
to read. 

One such an enjoyable scene finds Veronica 
and a suitor (Oliver Piatt) engaging in a 
grandiose sword fight, in perhaps the best writ- 
ten and photographed scene in the film. If only 
all of this razzle-dazzle had been focused on 
making the story go somewhere interesting. 
instead of its formulaic "Braveheart"-(sh end- 
ing, "Dangerous Beauty*' might have been 
more than a beautiful movie with absohitdy no 
brain. 

Lonnw HmtiS 
QnOttC 



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Under Tijuana's 
fun exterior lies 
world of scary 
experienres 

COLUMN: Mexico trip 
turns into nights of beer, 
frightening encounters 



The world in general is a pretty 
scary place when you're 19 
years old, five feet tall and 
have the face of a child. Tijuana, 
Mexico? It's hell on earth as far as 
I'm concerned. 

For the most part, my lifetime 
memories of Mexico (if you can call 
10 miles south of the border 
"Mexico") have been rather pleas- 
ant. Those visions of lounging on the 
white sand beaches of Rosarito, 
hinging on 50-cent tacos and sipping 
virgin pina coladas invoke nostalgic 
fantasies while slaving away over 
lame biology 
and astrono- 
my textbooks. 
Not until I 
turned 18, 
legal in 
Mexico's 
terms, and 
haddiscov-. . 
ered the magic 
of alcohol did 
I realize it was 
time to make 
that leap into 
adulthood. 

Did I dare quench that rebellious 
nature that I knew had been hiding 
inside of me? 

Pack up dad's minivan, girls. It's 
the summer after high school gradu- 
ation and we have a date with booze, 
babes and bumpin' beats (Ahhh, you 
like that, huh?). 

Little did I know of the dangers 
that I would have to face the second 
1 arrived in TJ, Baja California. 

Our first mission was to find the 
right club to boogie at all night long. 
We didn't even consider finding a 
hotel room in this "city of scum." We 
weren't that brave. Since we also 
weren't too keen on the idea of sleep- 
ing in the car, we challenged our- 
selves to party away every minute of 
our three days and two nights. No 
problem right? 

Well, let me tell you, I did not 
start this trip off as the party type. I 
grew up the good little Catholic 
school girl, devoted to her studies 
and sheltered from the evils of 
"those rowdy teenagers." I definitely 
was not prepared for those inane rit- 
uals that "naughty" kids find fre- 
quent enjoyment in. Right ofT, it was 
obvious we had a long night ahead of 
us when one of our more "experi- 
enced" friends ditched us (ride-less) 
as she and an unknown local drove 
away into the night. 

At the first club (for future refer- 
ence. I can't remember a smgle 
name of any clubs or people I 
encountered while there), we found 
had a huge sign in front that 
screamed "Foam Fest '97." My 
friends and I soon learned that bub- 
bles have many uses. Some a little 
too risque for this column, others we 
had the pleasure of experiencing first 
hand. Basically it was a dance party 
where bubbles, foam and suds are 
blown at the dance fioor through 
monstrous machines. Although the 
scene was getting a little frightening 
and the club's theme a little kinky for 
my tastes. I soon adapted to my envi- 
ronment, jumped right in. and had a 
blast dancing and drinking with suds 
up to my chin. 

Everything was cool until people 

SeeZUMATC,p49e21 





A couple (top) walks in the sunset at Seaport Village In San Diego. Indian musicians 
(above) display their palm-tree-structured headdresses while performing native 
music in front of the Mingei International Folk Art Museum. The Spirit of San Diego 
(right) offers harbor tours and private charters. It Is located on Harbor Drive. 




AweU-toned woman walks through a strip 
mall with her son, who can't be more than 
three years old. She stops, fiexes her legs 
and tells the kid, "Nobody has calves like your 
mother." The little boy looks at the calves, looks at 
his mother's face, then looks down and puts his 
hands in his pockets. They keep walking. 
A profoundly drunk high school student 



sprints into a restaurant totally naked, JUSC 

grabs a roll off a table and starts to eat J%^^ a ■ ■ c ^ 
it. Through a mouthful of roll, he *t>©CaUSe 

sings the first verse of Stevie 
Wonder's "Part-Time 



Southern California weirdness and a whopping 
bundle of fun things to do. 

Everyone has their ideas of what San Diego 

offers tourists. Images come forth of kids petting 

Shamu at Sea World, sneaky dads impressing their 

families by feeding peanuts to an elephant at the 

world famous San Diego Zoo and crazed Charger 

football fans with lightning bolts painted 

across their chests. In addition to standard 

tourist fare, however. Sag Diego can 

supply Bruins with activities both 

you Ve petted '"^^"' ^"** "^"^^ 



"L.A.'s such a bustling 

Lover," then runs away Shdll1IJ# CfOll't thlllk community; coming to 

before the maitre d' ■■ -, • ■ S*" Diego makes 

can detain him yOU Ve Seeil dll Sdll DiegO has you feel like 

Baffled din- ^ ^- - -^ -, . ^ ■ • you're in a 

ers hear to offer - froiii Top GuR nostalgia s m a 1 1 

ImginTthe to a phenomenofi known as 'body s Ty'^'l 

sTJg at hfnees womping/ the city to the ,^^:^ ^;:^l 
down the street south Is f ull of Weekend ^ ^'^"'^^'^^ «f ^^"^ 

On a sunny beach, a ^ ^ Greater San Diego 

man in a suit hands an over- OPPOrtUnitieS Chamber of Commerce. 

"We have a host of things to do." 



size check for $2,000 to a grinning 
beach bunny. She has just won the 
first place prize in a sand sculpture con- 
test for her rendition of a large cjfrtoon her- 
mit crab. A crowd of contest enthusiasts 
applaud, and the winner fiashes a thumbs-up. 

Welcome to San Diego. And you thought Los 
Angeles was weird. 

Bruins looking for a weekend getaway might 
want to consider making the two-hour trip south to 
San Diego, a city with its own distinctive Havor of 



For instance, want to play paint- 
ball with a bunch of Vietnam veterans 
who still think they're living in a war zone? 
Head down to Borderland Paintball Park, the 
only paintball spot in the world located right next to 
a skydiving landing zone (Signs everywhere say, 
"Please don't shoot the skydivers"). 

Perhaps lofting above the coastal cliffs of La 

Sec SAN MEOO, page 19 



,i,j<s ti^,m 



. *■ i :i 



'jii, ^tM':^: 



■•v-p- Hi" iN"ff| jf*.j"* *^*-*. - 



i 




Michelle 
Zubiate 



Under Tijuana's 
fun exterior lies 
world of scary 
experiences 

COLUMN: Mexico trip 
turns into nights of beer, 
frightening encounters 



The world in general is a pretty 
scary place when youre 19 
y^ars old, five feet tall and 
have the face of a child. Tijuana. 
Mexico? It's hell on earth as far as 
I'm concerned. 

For the most part, my lifetime 
memories of Mexico (if you can call 
10 miles south of the border 
"Mexico") have been rather pleas- 
ant. Those visions of lounging on the 
white sand beaches of Rosarito, 
binging on 50-cent tacos and sipping 
virgin pifia coladas invoke nostalgic 
fantasies while slaving away over 
lame biology 
and astrono- 
my textbooks. 

Not until I 
turned 18. 
legal in 
Mexico's 
terms, and 
had discov- 
ered the magic 
of alcohol did 
I realize it was 
time to make 
that leap into 
adulthood. 

Did I dare quench that rebellious 
nature that I knew had been hiding 
inside of me? 

Pack up dad's minivan. girls. It's 
the summer after high school gradu- 
ation and we have a date with booze, 
babes and bumpin" beats (Ahhh, you 
like that. huh?). 

Little did I know of the dangers 
that I would have to face the second 
I arrived in TJ. Baja California. 

Our first mission was to find the 
right club to boogie at all night long. 
We didn't even consider finding a 
hotel r(X)m in this "city of scum. " We 
weren't that brave. Since we also 
weren't too keen on the idea of sleep- 
ing in the car. we challenged our- 
selves to party away every minute of 
our three days and two nights. No 
problem right? 

Well, let me tell you. I did not 
start this trip off as the party type. I 
grew up the good little Catholic 
school girl, devoted to her studies 
and sheltered from the evils of 
"tho'se rowdy teenagers." I definitely 
was not prepared for those inane rit- 
uals that "naughty" kids find fre- 
quent enjoyment in. Right off, it was 
obvious we had a long night ahead of 
us when one of our more "experi- 
enced" friends ditched us (ride-less) 
as she and an unknown local drove 
away into the night. 

At the first club (for future refer- 
ence. I cant remember a smgle 
name of any clubs or people I 
encountered while there), we found 
had a huge sign in front that 
screamed "Foam Fest '97." My 
friends and I soon learned that bub- 
bles have many uses. Some a little 
loo risque for this column, others we 
had the pleasure of experiencing first 
hand Basically it was a dance party 
where bubbles, foam and suds are 
blown at the dance fioor through 
monstrous machines. Although the 
scene was getting a little frightening 
and the club's theme a little kinky for 
my tastes. I soon adapted to my envi- 
ronment, jumped right in. and had a 
blast dancing and drinking with suds 
up to my chin. 

tverything was cool until people 





A couple (top) walks in the sunset at Seaport Village in San Diego. Indian musicians 
(above) display their palnn-tree-structured headdresses while performing native 
music in front of the Mingei International Folk Art Museum. The Spirit of San Diego 
(right) offers harbor tour's and private charters. It is located on Harbor Drive. 



See ZUBIATE, page 21 




A well-toned woman walks through a strip 
mall with her son, who can't be more than 
three years old. She stops, flexes her legs 
and tells the kid, "Nobody has calves like your 
mother." The little boy looks at the calves, looks at 
his mother's face, then looks down and puts his 
hands in his pockets. They keep walking. 

A profoundly drunk high school student 
sprints into a restaurant totally naked, 
grabs a roll off a table and starts to eat 
it. Through a mouthful of roll, he 



Just 
because 



Southern California weirdness and a whopping 
bundle of fun things to do. 

Everyone has their ideas of what San Diego 

offers tourists. Images come forth of kids petting 

Shamu at Sea World, sneaky dads impressing their 

families by feeding peanuts to an elephant at the 

world famous San Diego Zoo and crazed Charger 

football fans with lightning bolts painted 

across their chests. In addition to standard 

tourist fare, however, San Diego can 

supply Bruins with activities both 



sings the first verse of Stevie \tf%ll'\t^ n^tf ^H restful and wild. 

Wonders 'Part-Time X**** ^^ pcmSU "L.A.s such a bustling 

Lover," then runs away SHaiTIU CfOll't thllllC community; coming to 

before the maitre d' ^ San Diego makes 

can detam h.m yOU Ve SeeR all San Diego has you feel Uke 

Baffled din- ^ -- - -^ -, - - ■ • you're in a 

ers hear to offer - from Top Gun' nostalgia s m a 1 1 
linging'the to a pHenomeiion known as 'body s Ty^l 
Zl :: hfnees womping/ the city to the ^^^J; - "^^ — 

down the street. SOUth IS full Of Weekend sentative of the 

On a sunny beach, a , ^ Greater San Diego 

man in a suit hands an over- OPPOrtUnitieS Chamber of Commerce. 



size check for $2,000 to a grinning 
beach bunny. She has just won the 
first place prize in a sand sculpture con- 
test for her rendition of a large cartoon her- 
mit crab. A crowd of contest enthusiasts 
applaud, and the winner flashes a thumbs-up. 

Welcome to San Diego. And you thought Los 
Angeles ^as weird. 

Bruins looking for a weekend getaway might 
want to consider making the twivhour trip south to 
San Diego, a city with its own distinctive Havor of 



"We have a host of things to do." 
For instance, want to play paint- 
ball with a bunch of .Vietnam veterans 
who still think they're living in a war /one'.' 
Head down to Borderland Paintball Park, the 
only paintball spot in the world located right next to 
a skydiving landing /one (Signs everywhere say. 
"Please don't shoot the skydiyers"). 

Perhaps lofting above the coastal cliffs of La 

See SAN MEOO, page 19 



fatfaibitioftKiinitniiJ^ 



-fi^ aat 



r JHNNMI)U«KII < 




AV ^ 



\: 



r ^. ,; _.....;. ^—- 






SECOND EXPOSURE 



K> 



18 Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



/ 



Stage is this group's playground as it turns in top-notch performance 



MUSIC: Opening act 
Lincoln sets perfect tone 
for New York-based band 



By Vanessa VanderZanden 

Daily Bruin Staff 

It's as simple as poppies. It's as 
sweet as sex and candy. It's as innocent 
as a romp on Marcy Playground. 

Wednesday night, the New York- 
based band, whose single, "Sex and 
Candy." has topped the modern rock 
charts for nine weeks now. took its 
basic beats and rolling rhythms to the 
Troubadour. The hour-and-a-quarter- 
long set ran as smoothly as any Los 
Angeles headlining debut could, the 
young group performing like seasoned 
professionals. Only the slick warm-up 
act. Lincoln, experienced any kind of 
panic. 

The opening musicians alluded to 
the fact, late in their set, that the gui- 
tarist laying down chords wasn't a 
Lincoln standard. The original player 
had to drop out of the performance at 
the eleventh hour, leaving the talented 
New York band to call on the only 
Angeleno they knew. Luckily for 
Lincoln, he just happened to be a gui- 
tarist with the capacity to fill in at the 
sold-out performance. 

But the crowd of twentysomething 
KROQ listeners in sharp leather jack- 
ets and relaxed fit jeans would never 
have been able to tell the difference. 
Lincoln's lead singer set the mellow 



mood with his well enunciated, bluesy- 
twang voice. Krishna-style blouse and 
shaved head. Going for the L.A. look, 
he of course accessorized with a pair of 
sunglasses. 

Humbly throwing out praise for 
Marcy Playground at every chance he 
could. Lincoln's lead singer ofTered the 
perfect warm-up vibe. The band played 
their steady-paced melodies with as 
much confidence as the comfortable 
sounding headliners. Offering uncom- 
plicated tunes at a down-to-earth level, 
Lincoln provided Marcy Playground 
with the appropriate lead-in. 

By the time singer/songwriter John 
Wozniak led his bassist and drummer 
on stage, the calm crowd had packed 
the floor. To the audience's delight, 
Marcy Playground started ofT with 
their first big radio release. "Poppies." 
Undaunted by the tremendous 
amounts of people filling the tight, road 
house-style club. Wozniak hit every 
note with tranquil precision. 

Almost as though they were playing 
the songs in their own basement, the 
casual performers seemed as comfort- 
able in front of a crowd as by them- 
selves Yet they never appeared oblivi* 
ous to the presence of the audience, 
able to shine as a result of their fans' 
attention. And. though they mostly just 
kept to their designated space on stage, 
foregoing any kind of heavy metal 
superstar antics. Wozniak 's self-aware 
dancing eyes and knowing smiles 
spoke to the crowd. 

Wozniak kept his lyrics coherent at 
every turn, realizing that the words 





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EMI Records 

(Left to right) Dylan Keefe, 
John Wozniak and Dan Reiser 

are Marcy Playground. 

really do matter. While some bands 
rely on catchy tufies anJ unintelligible 
choruses, much of Marcy 
Playground's appeal comes in the well- 
written tales they tell. For instance, 
who wouldn't want to hear the words 
to "Vampires of New York," which rat- 
tles off, "Or maybe she's already/ dead 
and maybe she's/ gone to Mars/' 
Maybe we could even/ write her epi- 
taph in the/ stars." 

When this song in particular came 
on, the crowd went crazy. Wozniak 
read the audience's whims to include 
an extended sing-a-long chorus which 
he abruptly dropped, deciding against 
it a second later. His ability to play to 
the audience spoke well of his perform- 
ing skills. 

Wozniak even alluded to an era of 



dorkiness in an entirely non-self-depre- 
cating way when he introduced "A 
Cloak of Elvenkind." The performer 
asked the crowd, "Do we like wood 
nymphs and lizards and dragons and 
magic books? Well, I wrote this song 
when that was all I knew." 

In a sharp contrast to this nostalgic 
childhood piece, the band moved on to 
its meal card song of the moment, "Sex 
and Candy." Opening the seductive 
tune by admitting, "I know you know 
this one," Wozniak led the half-singing 
audience through the overplayed radio 
sorig with grace and style. Even though 
the band members must be tired of 
rehashing the work at every stage per- 
formance, they never let on. 

However, Wozniak smoothly fol- 
lowed up the familiar tune with a new 
song, written for his wife. And, though 
the piece probably had been performed 
many times in the past, Wozniak 
seemed to truly feel the lyrics in the f)er- 
formance. Singing "All the nights ... she 
was all that I needed" after introducing 
the work saying, "Mad props to the 
wife," Wozniak appeared to be feeling 
the toll road life takes on the emotions. 

In a moment of spontaneity, 
NVozniak asked the crowd for requests, 
and when someone suggested Lynyrd 
Skynyrd's "Free Bird," he fooled 
around with the "Sweet Home 
Alabama" rilT. Turning to the bassist 
with a grin, Wozniak said, "You want 
to do it?" The response seemed less 
than intrigued. "You don't want to do 
it, that just makes me want to," 
Wozniak proclaimed to the crowd's 



delight. 

Soon, they broke into the down- 
home-style, hard-rockin' tune. Yet, 
Wozniak maintained his vocal crisp- 
ness, playing the piece Playground 
style. Apjjarently, this was only the 
third show the band played the cover, 
the time in Birmingham being so 
pumped it made them "feel like 
wrestlers." 

Wozniak offered a goofy, self-know- 
ing wink when he claimed "Secret 
Squirrel" will be the band's last song, 
suggesting they just might do an 
encore. The jamming piece, also a pre- 
viously unheard song, allowed the 
group to rock out before leaving the 
stage. But of course, they came back 
for two more tunes. 

The first of the songs had the drun> 
mer smoking a cigarette, not really in 
defiance of the new non-smoking laws, 
but more just because he seemed to 
want one. After all, Marcy Playground 
is a group of mama's boys, which 
Wozniak didn't attempt to hide, dedi- 
cating the second song to his mom who 
was somewhere in the crowd. It too 
was a new work, titled "Teenage 
Hypochondriac." 

Yet, the best part of the show clearly 
came in the final tune, which had 
Wozniak singing a cappella into the 
mic. Sounding like a religious ditty, the 
sweet, smooth piece showcased 
Wozniak's amazing singing capacity. 
He had the crowd repeating the line, 
"Good night" after him, offering the 
best closing to a show that many had 
seen in years. 




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Daily Bniin Arts & Enteftainment 



Friday, February 20, 1998 19 



BATES 



From page 14 



focus." Bates explains. "The body- 
building helps with my endurance. 
Most people don't recognize how 
physically demanding playing the 
piano can be, especially in the concert 
setting. You get tired, you're perspir- 
ing and that's when the conditioning 
really pays off because that's the whole 
goal of the conditioning." 

This may all sound like a gimmick, 
but Bates insists that it is not. And 
when he talks about the direct rela- 
tionship between piano and body- 
building techniques, it's hard not to 
see what he's talking about. Suddenly, 
the incongruity between the body and 
the soul needed to play the piano dis- 
appears. 

Critics cite his "power" most often 



"Both (the piano and 

bodybuilding) require a 

great deal of 

concentration." 

Leon Bates 

Pianist and bodybuilder 



because Bates looks absolutely enor- 
mous in his concert tuxedo. Yet, every 
critic marvels at the emotional depth 
that Bates is able to explore. Alicia 
Anstead of the Bangor Daily News 
called his performance, "skillful and 
honest, so elegant and warm." These 
types of reviews are common for Bates 
and serve to break down the stereo- 
type that muscle guys are too dense to 



comprehend the alphabet, let alone 
the complex Rachmaninoff chords. 

But Bates doesn't really care about 
breaking stereotypes. When he is 
called "a prominent black pianist" 
Bates is less than excited. 

"I'm flattered," he says. "But to me 
it's more important to be a good 
pianist than to be a black pianist, |t's 
about the musical experience for me." 

Bates attempts to convey that musi- 
cal experience in every concert he 
does. Still, Bates has built a career on 
surprising audiences and random peo- 
ple at the gym in the same breath. 

MUSIC: Leon Bates will perform^ 
Saturday at 8 p.m. at Schoenberg Hall. 
Tickets are $25, $10 \N\lh UCLA ID. He 
will hold a demonstration Monday 
from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the John 
Wooden Center. For more information, 
call (310) 825-2101. 



NOVA 



From page 14 

ble shots of the traditional coffee fare - 
latte, mocha, cappuccino, etc. There 
are also specialty drinks such as an 
Italian soda ($2.25), which is carbonat- 
ed water with a flavored syrup, which 
add a nice twist. A customer can 
choose from fruity flavors like blueber- 
ry and raspberry or almond and hazel- 
nut. Chocolate mint syrup combined 
with the carbonation leaves a cool 
aftertaste. 

On the other side of the beverage 
spectrum, the cafe also serves fresh 
fruit smoothies. Choice of fruit 



includes bananas, strawberries, blue- 
berries, peaches and cantaloupe or a 
mixture of all five fruits ($3.15 to 
$3.50). If the strawberry smoothie is 
any indication, these shakes are good 
for quenching thirst bat the consisten- 
cy is thin, not creamy. However, the 
fresh strawberry taste is .still apparent. 
Freshness is one quality upheld 
throughout the menu. 

Desserts are the same conventional 
goodies served at other coffee places - 
chocolate cake, cheesecake, carrot 
cake, biscotti and pre-purchased cook- 
ies ($3.25). 

For anyone who feels the need to 
escape the world of Westwood in the 
dead of night or the wee hours of the 



For anyone who feels 
the need to escape the 

world of Westwood ... 

Nova Express Cafe 
serves as the ideal spot. 



morning, especially after a long week 
of classes. Nova Express Cafe serves as 
the ideal spot. With its mouth-watering 
pizza and cozy nooks and crannies, the 
cafe makes a great magnet for the col- 
lege crowd. 



SAN DIEGO 



From page 17 



Jolla sounds more appealing. The 
Torrey Pines Glider Port, located 
across the street from UCSD, 
gives hang gliding lessons to every- 
one from first-timers to experts, 
and presents a spectacular view to 
wussies who don't want to strap 
themselves to a big kite. 

With all this skydiving and hang 
gliding, San Diego's culture might 
seem obsessed with airborne 
endeavors. Remember, the naval 
academy Top Gun used to be 
located at Naval Air Station, 
Miramar. but it has since moved. 
Still, Bruins are welcome to visit 
Kansas City Barbecue, the restau- 
rant where the cast of "Top Giin" 
sang Jerry Lee Lewis' "Great Balls 
of Fire" at the piano. ^' 

Speaking of movie landmarks, 
if that tickles your pickle, check 
out Hotel Del Coronado, the ele- 
gant and ultra-classy spot that 
served as a backdrop for Jack 
Lemmon. Walter Matthau and 
Marilyn Monrpe in "Some Like It 
Hot." 

Or, if the Del Coronado strikes 
you as dull, sign up to become a 
Navy Seal and go through the infa- 
mous "Hell Week" training regi- 
ment on the other side of 
Coronado. It might be wise lo Hit 
the exer-bike at the . Wooden 
Center for some training before- 
hand. 

More mellow San Diego pur- 
suits include strolling down 
Prospect Street in La Jolla, watch- 



ing chubby sea lions lounge at 
nearby Children's Cove, shopping 
at downtown's Horton Plaza or 
checking out Old Town, home of 
the Whaley House, the country's 
"most haunted house" according 
to some federal landmark agency. 
Animal lovers can find a turtle 
farm in Jamul, a parrot ranch in 
Mt. Helix and plenty of fish and 
sea life at the Stephen Birch 
Aquarium in La Jolla. If you have 
to drink during the day, the aquar- 
ium is by far the best place to 
explore in San Diego while intoxi- 
caled... H3V5j[oy ever chugged a 40 
and then r^alTy taken a good look 
at livejellyfish?Those tentacles are 
amazing. 

No, no, liquor is bad. But for 
those Bruins old enough to 
responsibly disagree, San Diego 
serves up some great bar scenes' 
with sexy young patrons. Garnet 
Avenue in Pacific Beach, lined 
with bars, thrift stores, music 
retailers and pool halls, goes off at 
night, as does downtown's historic - 
Gaslamp District. Even La JoUa's 
Prospect Street turns up the funk- 
o-meter a few notches at night, 
cutting loose at places like Jose's, 
Moondoggie's and the Hard Rock 
Cafe. The area around SDSU also 
gets pretty crazy, if Bruins can 
handle sucking it up for a while 
and venturing to a (gag) State 
school. 

"We have over 45 TVs, and we 
get a huge UCLA crowd for the 
Bruin basketball gatnes," says 
Todd Jilbert of Moondoggie's. 

See SAN DIEGO, page 20 




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20 Friday, Ffbfuary 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 






■t 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



Friday, February 20, 1998 21 




SAN DIEGO 



From page 19 

After a night of cavorting, the 
best place to wind up in the morning 
is buck-ass naked on the sand at 
Black's Beach, about a mile north of 
Scripps Pier. Black's Beach has 
earned notoriety over the years not 
necessarily because it is a nude 
beach, but because it is a nude 
beach with excellent waves. Mr. 



Black, for whom Black's Beach was 
named, actually lives farther south 
in front of another beach with excel- 
lent waves, Windansea in La Jolla. 

No experience on a San Diego 
beach would be complete without 
taking part in a phenomenon called 
"body womping." Body womping is 
best enjoyed at Marine Street in La 
Jolla. It involves standing about 
waist deep in water a few feet from 
the shore and waiting for a massive 
wave to womp you onto the sand. 



1 


- T.. T . »., 






• 



Photos by DERRICK KUCX3 

(Above) Planet Hollywood located in Horton Plaza in Downtown 
San Diego, is designed to "capture the excitement and glannour of 
Hollywood." (Left) A stftue in Plaza de Panama at Balboa Park 
marks the entrance to the House of Charm building. 



After a hard landing, people tradi- 
tionally yell, "Dude, killer womp!" 
The kids love it. Again, a little time 
on the exer-bike at the Wooden 
Center wouldn't hurt before giving 
womping a try. 

Farther down the coast, south of 
Mission Beach, Belmont Park dares 
thrill-seekers to take a ride on a his- 
toric wooden roller coaster called 
The Giant Dipper. Other rides and 
interesting shops highlight Belmont 
Park, as well as an enormous public 
pool called The Plunge. The Plunge 
is bigger than Lake Tahoe, but it's a 
public pool. While that might not 
sound too clean, it's supposedly 
quite sanitary. 

Bruins visiting San Diego have 
permission to keep going south, 
south, south, all the way to Tijuana 
where the drinking age is 18. Many 
clubs and bars wait for your patron- 
age. Tijuana is also home to perhaps 
the most bizarre tourist photo- 
graphic opportunity in the world. 
You and your friends can put on a 
sombrero, sit on a donkey adorned 
with colorful blankets and clothing 
and spend $10 to have a black and 
white Polaroid taken. Be sure to 
keep this memento in the glove box 
on the drive home, or the Border 
Patrol agent will see it and giggle. 
Then he'll make you stop while he 

SeeSANDIEfiO,pa9e21 



SAN DIEGO 



From page 20 

shows the picture to his Border 
Patrol bud dies, and they'll all have 
a good laugh before letting you 
return to the United States. This can 
be embarrassing, and yes, it does 
happen! 

Now that Bruins have a few ideas 



what to do in San Diego, two ques- 
tions arise: how to get there and 
■* where to stay? Amtrak round-trip 
rates are $40 from Union Station in 
downtown L.A. to downtown San 
Diego or $32 from Union Station to 
Solana Beach, about 30 minutes 
north of downtown San Diego. The 
best bet by far is by automobile. 
Take the 405 South which merges 
with 5 South, which takes you to San 



No experience on a San 

Diego beach would be 

complete without ...a 

phenomenon called 

"body womping." 



Diego. 

If you're from San Diego, call 
your parents. They might let you 
stay in your old room. If you have 
friends in San Diego, stay with 
them. If you have a Bruin buddy 
from San Diego, impose yourself on 
their family. Otherwise, find a hotel. 
La Jolla hotel rooms get a little 
pricey, except for maybe the 
Travelodge and the Sea Lodge (at 



La Jolla Shores). Dowjitown gets a 
little expensive, too, so try near 
Ocean Beach or Hotel Circle, near 
SDSU. It's all pretty simple, and a 
trip to Sun Diego is well worth the 
little effort required in getting there 
and finding accommodations. 

While enjoying a San Diego get- 
away, it's always important to 
remember one thing: nobody has 
calves like your mother. 



ZUBIATE 



From page 16 

wet. Shirts, pants and other unmen- 
tionables flew off nimble bodies 
grooving to old-school and deep 
house. Beer and water were tossed 
around and soon everyone was soak- 
ing from head to toe in some type of 
liquid. Just my luck, I happened to be 
wearing a white blouse. I started to 
get nervous and fmally rounded up 
my group to head off to the next 
club. 

Unfortunately there would be no 
more clubs that night. Not a single 
cab in TJ would take us anywhere in 
our drenched condition. Cold, hun- 
gry and reeking of beer, four of us 
wandered aimlessly through the dark 
alleys and gutter streets of downtown 
TJ. 



Ever watch the news and find 
yourself getting frustrated with those 
stupid kids that get themselves mixed 
up in bad situations? Yup. That 
would be us. Four naive little girls 
without a clue in a foreign country 
with little more than 50 bucks and a 
pack of gum between us. We finally 
found a McDonald's that had a walk- 
up window open 24 hours. The guy 
inside had the right idea. He was 
relaxing warmly, surrounded by food 
and hidden behind three inches of 
bulletproof glass. 

Drunk as hell, I crashed on the 
slimy sidewalk while my friend 
attacked two British guys with ques- 
tions like "Do you know where 
Robert Smith lives? Who's Robert 
Smith?!? From The Cure, dammit! 
You call yourselves English?!" 

The next thing I remember it was 
night two of our adventure. 



My friends and I were at a new 
club discovering the miracles of two- 
for-one drinks and Long Island Iced 
Teas. Do you know what are in those 
things? Every kind of liquor imagin- 
able! It was heaven. That is until we 
got kicked out for throwing spit balls 
and playing with their plastic mon- 
keys. 

We hopped into another cab and 
told the driver we didn't care where 
we went as long as it was loud and 
rockin'. How the subject came up I 
can't remember, but we started talk- 
ing to the driver about how weed is a 
federal offense in Mexico and that 
Ihey would take you to a Guadalajara 
jail if you're caught with any on you. 
That freaked us out, but what was 
even scarier was the driver moaning 
"You like marijauna? You want mari- 
juana? I take you to marijuana?" 

I've seen enough "Cops" to know 



that this is not a cool deal. We got out 
at the next corner and waited for a 
safer cab to come by. It was at this 
moment I experienced Tijuana in all 
its frightening glory. Stray dogs 
roamed the streets among piles of 
dirty diapers and headless dolls. The 
shoddy houses against a background 
of dying streetlamps looked like 
remains of a bombed village in World 
War II. A one-armed man, in effort 
to beat out the competition, was 
already selling churros. He came 
towards us shi'ieking "Quieres chur- 
ros? Si!" over and over. Limping 
closer and closer until. ... 

Sorry to disappoint, but I can't 
recall any more than that. It's a mad 
blur of suppressed memories. Why I 
let myself become involved in the 
worst of after-school specials is still a 
mystery to me. Let's say peer pressure. 

I did come away with some valu- 



able cultural education however. 
Although I am Mexican-American, 
my parents decided I did not need to 
learn Spanish growing up. Not that 
you need much in TJ, but I did learn 
some valuable words. There are the 
staples "cerveza" and "tequila," and 
a brand new vocabulary word, "chu- 
pacabra!" (Another very scary ele- 
ment of Mexico. It's a weird cross 
between a bat, a monster and a vam- 
pire. The literal translation would be 
"goat sucker." It is also a very tasty 
drink.) Consider yourself educated. 

There it is. I am pleased to say that 
I lived through such a traumatic 
experience and can now grace the 
public with my vast knowledge on the 
subject. In fact, there is a moral to 
the story. Tijuana, Mexico: scary shit. 

Zubiate is a first year undeclared stu- 
dent. 



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«■«•♦»•».*•«». r V , I 



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22 Friday, February 20,1998 



Daily Bruin Sports 



Team unites 
as family to 
fill void left 
by McCoy 

COLUMN: Victory over 
use proves that UCLA 
can rise to the occasion 



I know that the following para- 
graphs are going to shock 
many of you. 1 am prepared to 
receive several responses, and, if I 
am lucky, many of you will write to 
Viewpoint explaining how I have 
become some crazed Bruin with 
no spirit or 
pride in our 
basketball 
team. 

However. 
I have to say 
what I have 
to say and 
deal with the 
ramifications 
later. 

We should 
not have 

beaten USC 

in basketball 

Wednesday night at the Los 
Angeles Sports Arena. Wait a 
minute. Don't get upset with me. 
Please listen to what I have to say. 

The Bruins played well the 
entire game, but they played their 
best during crucial times. When 
Baron Davis fouled out just min- 
utes before the game ended, and 
with the loss of Jelani McCoy, the 

See JOHNSON, page 25 




Stan 
Johnson 



BRUIN UPDATE^ 

• — yfg p' 

Today's matdmi^ 

Baseball ^^^ 

vs. StanfOj^ 
Men's voU^ttall 
, vs. UC sin Bernadii 
Softball f 

at SDSUj(5umament 
Women's tennis 

at USTA nSJ 

Men's tennis 

at National Indoor 
Championships 




Satu 




atdies: 



tball 



Sasebaft 

vs. 
W( 

vs. USC 
Men's volleyball 

vs. Northridge 



Surtday's ma 

B«s«batl 

vs. Stanford 
Men's basketball 

vs. Duke 
IVofnen's gymnastics 

at Boiln Classic 




SPORTS 



Stmi' 



W.HOOPS: UCLA honors 
best women's basketball 
players with ceremony 

By Owis UmpiciTe 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

UCLA is well known around the 
country for its great men's basketball 
program. 

Most people know about the II 
national championships, legendary 
coach John Wooden and great players 
such as Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Reggie 
Miller and Bill Walton who have 
graced Pauley Pavilion with their col- 
lective presence. 

But few know about the stellar his- 
tory of the UCLA women's basltetball 
program. 

This history will be displayed and 
honored on Saturday, when the Bruins 
take on the USC Trojans at 2 p.m. in 
Pauley Pavilion. At halftime, the 
UCLA women's basketball program 
will honor Uie 1977-1978 national 
championship team and the program's 
15 greatest players. 

"A lot of people know about the his- 
tory of the men's program, but the 
women's history is pretty stellar as 
well," assistant coach Pam Walker 
said, who has not only coached the last 
eight years, but is a former Bruin star. 

The top 15 players have been select- 
ed as follows, in no particular order: 
Anne Meyers, Denise Curry, Anita 
Ortega, Dianne Frierson-Fowler. 
Sheila Adams, Nicole Anderson, Anne 
Dean-Gardner, Dora Dome, Mary 
Hegarty, Jackie Joyner Kersee, Dr. 
Karen Nash, Rehema Stephens, Necie 
Thompson, Sandra Van Embricqs and 
Natalie Williams. 




Sc« HISTORY, page 25 



ASUCLA PtKiloqraphy 

Denise Curry (left) and Ann Meyers (right) hold up head coach Billie Moore after the Bruins captured 
their one and only Women's Basketball National Championship in 1 978. 




Second team gets chance to start 



MARY CItCEK 

Sophomore setter Brandon Taliaferro hits the ball 
in a match against UC Santa Barbara. 



VOLLEYBALL Bruins to test its 
depth by utilizing entire bench 
during upcoming matches 



By Grace Wen 

Daily Bruin Staff 

The UCLA men's volleyball team will be 
using the weekend to remove splinters from 
their butts. 

The Bruins (11-0, 9-0 Mountain Pacific 
Sports Federation) will be testing the 
depths of its bench, as the second team will 
be given the chance to start on Friday 
night. 

UCLA will be playing matches against 
Cal State San Bernardino and Cal State 
Northridge in the Wooden Center this 
weekend. Both matches will start at 7 p.m. 

"We're going to play a lot of the guys sit- 
ting on the bench and give all 12 players a 
workout," UCLA head coach Al Scales 
said. 

The Bruins have only played the Coyotes 
once and actually dropped a game to San 
Bernardino before winning the overall 
match. 

The focus of the weekend will most likely 
be on Saturday night's match against the 
Matadors. Although Northridge is in the 
cellar of the Mountain Division, Scates 
expects more of a challenge from the 
Matadors. ' 



"I'm not anticipating a strong match 
Friday but Northridge has given us trouble 
over here in our gym before, so we'll be 
ready for that," Scates said. 

UCLA boasts a 36-2 record against Cal 



MEN'S VOLLEYBALL \ 

7pjn. 
Wooden Center 




vs. 

Cal State 
San Bernardino 



Jm 



*%-■ 



ERNEST LEE/D»ity Brum 

State Northridge. UCLA has won the last 
13 times the teams faced off. However, one 
of Northridge's wins did come on Bruin ter- 
ritory. 

Under first-year head coach Jeff 
Campbell, the Matadors currently have a 3- 
6 record and are 1-6 in conference play. 
Northridge's only conference win has come 
against USC, one of two teams that the 
Bruins have dropped a game to. 

Northridge has been swept four times 
this season and will probably experience its 
fifth beating this weekend. 

UCLA will continue to experiment with 
its lineup. The Bruins, who were voted No. 
I for the fifth straight week, have won with 
seven different lineups. 



Daily Bnjin Sports 



Friday, Ffbrwry 20, 1998 23 



Duke game tests Bruin confidence 



M.BASKETBALL: Shaken 
UCLA team could turn 
season around with win 



By Brent Boyd 

Dally Bruin Staff 

Perhaps Kris Johnson said it 
best. 

"If you can't get up for this bas- 
ketball game, then you can't get 
up for anything." 

When the Bruins travel up 
Tobacco Road this weekend to 
take on second-ranked Duke, it 
could be construed as the biggest 
game of the season thus far. 

No, it won't count in the league 
standings, it won't determine a 
national championship, and a loss 
will not eliminate the Bruins from 
the NCAA Tournament. 

But a win could do wonders to 



MEN'S BA 





SwKiay 
^ IfrMaimi 
Cameron Indoor 
Stu&m 
[channel? 



Duke 




ERNEST LEE/Daily Brum 



a team whose psyche has been tee- 
tering on the edge of self-destruc- 
tion the past few months. 

"It'll definitely be a big confi- 
dence booster for us." senior for- 
ward Kris Johnson said. "I think 
that's what it'll do mostly for us. I 
think that's what this team needs 
right now - is a big win there. 

"We might be able to get some 
confidence back and hopefully 
shut up a couple of people's 
mouths that keep saying we're fin- 
ished." 

A blowout loss, on the other 
hand, could be disastrous for the 
team, which in the last week has 
lost one of its key players and have 
barely pulled out victories over 
Pac-10 also-rans USC and 
California. 

"I Just see this game as a big chal- 
lenge for us," senior forward J.R. 
Henderson said. "It's an obstacle for 
us that we can either leap over or get 
smashed by ." 

But, Johnson was quick to add, 
"We're not going to put any kinds of 
ridiculous amounts of pressure upon 
ourselves." 

The Bruins will be up against a 




AARON TOUI/Daily Bfuin 

Freshman guard Earl Watson flies high, dishing off during the UCLA victory over the USC Trojans. 



team that has been extremely hot. 
Duke (24-2) has gone 13-1 in the 
extremely tough Atlantic Coast 
Conference, outscoring its confer- 
ence opponents by an average of 
nearly 17 points per contest - the 
only loss coming to top-ranked 
North Carolina. 

Led by guards Trajan Langdon 
and Steve Wojciechowski, Duke has 
shot an average of nearly eight three- 
pointers per game and has scored 88 
points per game. 



In addition, forward Roshown 
McLeod has performed excellently - 
averaging a team-high 17.2 points 
per game in the conference season. 

UCLA head coach Steve Lavin 
sees this game as an excellent litmus 
test for the Bruins. 

"It will kind of simulate the condi- 
tions that they'll face in the NCAA 
Tournament," he said. "I think we're 
Just at a point in the season where it's 
really more than Duke being imf)or- 
Unt. 



"We have five opportunities to 
look good before the NCAA 
Tournament." 

For the Bruins to hang tough, 
they will need a good performance 
ffom their big guys as well as solid 
performances from the freshmen 
guards Earl Watson and Baron 
Davis - tasks easier said than done - 
considering the raucous atmosphere 
at Cameron Indoor Stadium, an 
arena in which the Blue Devils have 
won 20 consecutive contests. 



Trojan defeat would help honor alumnae 



PREVIEW: Former UCLA 
champs to view^ame 
against crosstown rival 



By Chris Umpierre 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

The UCLA women's basketball 
team is planning a big party for 
Saturday afternoon in Pauley 
Pavilion, and they are hoping that 
some Trojans don't come in and spoil 
the fun. 

The Bruins (15-7. 10-3 Pac-10) are 
planning to honor the 1977-1978 
UCLA National Championship 
team, the only one in school history, 
and the program's top 15 players at 
the halftime of their game against 
Southern Cal (10-12, 5-8 Pac-10) 
which begins at 2 p.m. on Saturday at 
Pauley Pavilion. 

But head coach Kathy Olivier 



knows that the Trojans want to come 
in and spoil the celebration. 

"Our team has to come out ready 
to play against them," Olivier said. 
"Who cares if they are in seventh 
place in the Pac-10 and are having a 
bad year? That means nothing. They 
are going to come in here and want to 
be the spoilers and kick our butts." 

The Bruins will be playing in front 
of the best that have ever suited up in 
blue and gold for the program, and a 
loss in front of the likes of former 
coach Billie Moore, Anne Meyers. 
Denise Curry, and Natalie Williams 
would truly ruin the festivities. 

"I know it would put a damper on 
the evening if we don't win," Olivier 
said. "I think our players are going to 
get up for it. It's 'SC, if you can't get 
up for 'SC then you can't get up." 

Olivier also feels some pressure 
from the fact that legendary Bruin 
coach Billie Moore, who amassed 
296 victories in her stellar career, will 



be sitting in the stands. 

"I like doing well in front of her," 
said Olivier, who took over the pro- 
gram in 1993 after being an assistant 
coach under Moore for seven years. 
"Just because I know if we make mis- 
takes she'll get on me, which is 



WOMEN SJI ^SKETBALL 

Saturday 

Pauley Pavilion 





ERNEST LELDaily Brum 



good." 

Maylana Martm, UCLA's Ail- 
American forward candidate, feels 
the pressure won't come from the 
stands but from the standings. 



"Just the fact that we are playing 
USC and we need to win anyway is 
going to be the pressure enough," 
Martin said. 

The Bruins are currently in second 
place in the Pac-10 conference at 10-3 
and need a win not only to stay with- 
in an arm's length of Stanford, who 
has a 11-1 record, but to stay in reach 
of a tournament bid. 

Although UCLA has 15 wins on 
the year, only two have come against 
ranked opponents (against 
Washington and Duke). 

The Bruins will have to bring their 
"A" game on Saturday to defeat the 
Trojans, who have not only owned 
the crosstown rivalry (28-19). but 
despite their poor record, have the 
ability to challenge UCLA this sea- 
son. 

On Jan. 23, when these two teams 
met at USC's Lyon Center, the 

See W JASKETBALL, page 26 



Pitching icey 
to stril(ing 
out Cardinal 

BASEBALL Bruins' young 
talent must confront vast 
experience of Stanford 



By Kristina Wilcox 

Daily Bruin Staff 

Both teams played in the College 
World Series last year. Both teams lost 
a few players to the amateur draft and 
brought in a lot of freshmen for the 
1998 season. 

Yet the difference between the 
UCLA and Stanford baseball squads 
is in the pitching. 

When the No. 14 Bruins host the 
No. 1 Cardinal this weekend for three 
games at Jackie Robinson Stadium, 
three veteran pitchers will start for 
Stanford ( 10-0-1 ). while UCLA (74, 2- 
in Six-Pac) will counter with three 
underclassmen who had never started 
a college game on the mound before 
the 1998 season. 



BASEBALL 




Today s,^ ^ 
7 p.m. ^^ ^^ 
Jackie ftobfrison 
ium 



Stanford 



ERNEST LEE/Oaily Bfuin 



Regardless, UCLA pitching coach 
Tim Leary is confident in his three 
starters. 

"Stanford has more experience in 
tHfcir starting pitching than we do, but 
our guys have a lot of talent. We just 
have to keep going out there and keep 
learning from every outing." 

UCLA has indeed been learning as 
it plays. The players are riding a six- 
game winning streak into the weekend, 
after starting the season on a 14 slide. 

UCLA's weekend pitchers - sopho- 
more Rob Henkel (1-2, 7.64 ERA), 
true freshman Chad Cislak (2-1, 6.00), 
and redshirt sophomore Ryan 
Reightley (00, 6.94) have all chipped 
away at high ERAs to bring them 
down to a respectable level. 



"We've got the work 
cut out for us." 

^ Gary Adams 

UCLA baseball head coach 



But they are countered this week- 
end by what many call the best pitching 
rotation in the nation. All three are 
juniors and iill were on Pre-Season All- 
American teams. 

Friday's game will feature the pitch- 
ing of righthander Jeff Austin (3-0, 
2.00), who was the No. 1 starter in the 
1997 U.S. National Team. 

Left-hander Brent Hoard (1-0, 5.52) 
starts on Saturday. He was the Pitcher 
of the Year in the premiere summer 
league at Cape Cod. 

The series finale features right- 
.> handed starter Chad Hutchinson (2-0, 
4.12), who is also the quarterback for 
the Cardinal football team. 

"We've got the work cut out for us," 
UCLA head coach Gary Adams said. 
"You never go into a game thinking 
you're going to lose. We're going into 
all of these games believing we're 
going to win. 

" But its not gonna be easy." 

With contributions from Vytas Mazeika, 
Daily Bruin Staff. 



24 Friday, Ffbruary 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin Sports 



CALIFORNIA SPORTS 




Lakers 131, 
Nuggets 92 



Rick Fox scored 22 points and Kobe 
Bryant had 21 Thursday night as the Los 
Angeles Lakers ended a season-high three- 
game losing streak with a 1 3 1 -92 rout of the 
Denver Nuggets. 

Shaquille O'Neal added 19 points and 
II rebounds, helping the Lakers beat 
Denver for the seventh consecutive time. 
The 5-47 Nuggets lost their fifth in a row 
overall. 

LaPhonso Ellis and Johnny Newman 
scored 19 points for Denver. 

The Lakers led 64-38 at halftime, build- 
ing the big lead even though starting point 
guard Nick Van Exel was at home with a 
cold and a sore right knee. 

The Nuggets, 0-28 against teams with 
winning records, took an early 14-10 lead. 
But the Lakers, also playing without 
injured forward Robert Horry and reserve 
Corie Blount, responded with a 17-1 run 
and went on to their most-lopsided win of 
the season. 




Heat 89, 
Clippers 80 



Alonzo Mourning had 28 points and P.J. 
Brown had a career-high 20 rebounds 
Thursday night, leading the Miami Heat to 
an 89-80 win over the Los Angeles 
Clippers. 

Tim Hardaway added 16 points as the 
Heat beat the Clippers several hours after 
the learns made a trade just ahead of the 
NBA deadline. 

Miami sent backup center Isaac Austin, 
rookie guard Charles Smith and a 1998 
first-round draft choice to the Clippers for 
Brent Barry. tht^96 NBA slam-dunk 
champion. 

None of those players suited up for the 



game, and both teams had just nine players 
in uniform. 

Rookie Maurice Taylor led the Clippers 
with 17 points and Eric Piatkowski added 
16 for Los Angeles, which lost its fifth 
straight game. 

The Heat led 53-45 at halftime and 
outscored the Clippers 11-2 to start the 
third quarter. Mourning capped the spurt 
with a pair of dunks. 

Miami was in command the rest of the 
way, and Clippers only made the score 
respectable with a game-ending 12-0 run 
after Mourning left for good. 

^^ Brent Barry 
^^ goes to Miami 

Brent Barry, the 1996 slam dunk cham- 
pion, was traded Thursday by the Los 
Angeles Clippers to the Miami Heat for 
Isaac Austin, rookie Charles Smith and a 
1998 No. I draft choice. 

The teams played each other Thursday 
night at the Anaheim Arena. Neither 
Austin nor Barry suited up for their new 
teams. 

Barry, who will be a free agent at the end 
of the season, had told the Clippers he did 
not intend to re-sign with them next sum- 
mer. He's expected to be the third guard in 
Miami's rotation behind Tim Hardaway 
and Voshon Lenard. 

Miami coach Pat Riley said the 26-year- 
old Barry, the son of NBA great Rick 
Barry, will be sidelined for another five or 
six days because of a sprained right ankle 
he suffered Monday against Houston. 

"We feel extremely pleased with what 
we were able to get for Ike." Riley said. 
"Ike was a very, very important part of our 
team, we're going to really miss him. But 
we feel we get back a very young player 
who is exciting. He has great size, a player 
who can play (three positions) for us. We 
feel like he has a real huge upside." 



Bruins limber up for annual Gassic 



GYMNASTICS: Injuries may help, 
not hurt team that traditionally 
starts off slowly, finishes strong 



ByOiristieDcBeau 

Dally Bruin Contributor 

The UCLA women's gymnastics team (8-1) is 
back at home this weekend to host the second 
annual Bruin Classic on Sunday at 2 p.m. in 
Pauley Pavilion. The Bruins will face the compe- 
tition of No. 7 Penn State (6-2), No. 14 Oregon 
State (5-1 ) and Cal State FuUerton (24). 

In addition to the tough competition at this 
meet, fifth-ranked UCLA will be honoring its 
three senior members - Stella Umeh, Andrea 
Fong and Carmen Tausend. 

For walk-on senior Fong, this season has pro- 
vided an exciting final year competing for the 
Brui^is, and she is eager to compete at home this 
Sunday. 

"I love competing at home. Pauley has this 
magical feeling with the home crowd and all the 
fans. Also, it is nice to comf)ete at home with your 
own equipment where you are used to every- 
thing," says Fong. 

The Arizona meet, on Jan. 23, marked her first 
time performing in all-around competition at the 
collegiate level. Last week, at the meet against 
Cal, Fong beat her personal best for all-arounds 
with a score of 38.525. 

"I am excited about my performances this 
year," Fong said. "This is the most I have ever 
competed since 1 have been here and I have done 
well for myself. It is exciting to get to contribute 
on the competition floor." 

Sunday's meet also holds significance for 
junior Susie Erickson, who will compete at home 
for the first time in her second meet of the season, 
after a three and a half month break from com- 
petition due to a broken foot. 

Last week, Erickson returned to competition 
on the balance beam, earning a score of 9.65, and 
performed an exhibition on the uneven bars. 

"It feels really good to be a part of the team 



again," Erickson said. "It is really fun and excit- 
ing to be competing. I am glad to back. Everyone 
is really supportive, and Valorie is very support- 
ive, so it was a smooth transition. 

"I think my first meet was really successful, 
and I feel good about where I am at right now. I 
have been working on beam and bars, trying to 
get a bar routine, hopefully. I just keep working, 
going in the right direction with my ankle and tak- 
ing care of myself." 

Erickson plays an important role on,the Bruin 
team because of emotional and physical stability 
during competition. She has worked hard to 
return to competition this season and as a result 
of her efforts, Erickson is stronger than she was 
before the injury. 

"Susie plays a part on the team because she is 
such a rock for us; the team feels so much stabili- 
ty when she is competing," UCLA head coach 
Valorie Kondos said. "She is very confident and 
calm on the floor. She always comes in prepared 
and competes with confidence. 

"Whether she falls or not, is not the issue. It is 
the fact that from the minute she is in that train- 
ing room and in the gym wanning up, you can 
count on her to be emotionally and physically sta- 
ble the whole time she is out there while some ath- 
letes run high and low. 

"It is also good to see an athlete work so hard. 
She is in twice as good of shape as she was when 
she got injured. So she really did the job that was 
expected of her over the break. She has worked 
hard, endlessly, and she is a much better athlete 
now than when she got injured." 

The Bruins have adjusted to many changes 
throughout this season, mainly because of 
injuries. Top all-arounder Mohini Bhardwaj 
remains out this week due to ankle injury, joining 
junior Luisa Portocarerro, who has a sprained 
ankle. However, the team has persevered and has 
used these unexpected turn of events as a team 
building experience. 

"I think it has been a good thing," Kondos 
said. "Mohini is coming along very well, and I 
think if it were Nationals we would definitely be 

See GYMNASTICS, page 26 




Any large Pizza, your choice of toppings and crust, for $9,99 

824-4111 Fast, Free DelfVeiy 



until 1 a.m. Sunday-ThuiBday 
until 2 a.m. Friday & Saturday 



1114 Gayley Ave. 
Westwood Village 



Mens College BasketbdII 
How The Top 2S Fared 



1 . North Carolina (26- 1 ) did rwt play. 
Next; vs. North Carolina State, Saturday. 

2. Ouke (24-2) did not play. Next: vs. No. 
12 UCLA, Sunday. 

3. Arizona (22-3) at Oregon State. Next; at 
Oregon, Saturday. 

4. Kansas (28-3) did not play. Next; vs. 
Iowa State, Saturday. 

5. Purdue (22-5) did not play. Next; at 
Penn State, Saturday 

6. Utah (21-2) did not play. Next; vs. Air 
Force, Saturday. 

7. Connecticut (23-4) did not play. Next; at 
Villanova, Saturday. 

8 Kentucky (23-4) did not play. Next: vs. 
Georgia, Sunday 

9. Princeton (2 1-1 ) did not play. Next; vs. 
Harvard, Friday 

10 Stanford (21 3) vs. Washington. Next; 
vs Washington State, Saturday. 

1 1 . New Mexico (21 -3) beat Texas-El Paso 
95-71 . Next; at No. 19 Texas Christian, 
Saturday. 

1 2. UCLA (20-5) did not play. Next; at No. 2 
■Duke, Sunday. 

13. South Carolina (19-5) did not play. 
Next; at Flofida, Saturday. 

14. Michigan State (19-5) did not p»ay. 
Next at Wisconsin, Saturday. 

1 5. Mississippi (18-5) did not play. Next: at 
Mississippi State. Saturday. 

16 Arkansas (21-5) did not play. Next: vs. 
Auburn, Saturday. 

17 Cincinnati (20-5) beat Alabama- 
Birmin9liMn93-76.Next:vs.DePaul, 
SaturdiyL 

18. Massachusetts (19-7) did not play. 



Next: vs. St. Joseph's, Saturday. 

19. Texas Christian (23-4) did not play. 
Next: vs. No. 1 1 New Mexico, Saturday. 

20. West Virginia (21-5) did not play. Next: 
vs. Seton Hall, Sunday. 

21 . Syracuse (20-5) did not play. Next: at 
Rutgers, Saturday. 

22. Michigan (18-8) did not play. Next; vs. 
Indiana, Sunday. 

23. Illinois (19-8) did not play. Next: vs. 
Iowa, Sunday. 

24. George Washington (20-6) did not 
play. Next vs. Temple, Sunday 

25. Maryland (15-9) lost to Wake Forest 
83-79. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Saturday. 



Olympic Meddh 
At A Glance 



Germany 

Norway 

Russia 

Austria 

Canada 



9 5 
3 5 
5 5 



Netherlands 5 4 
United States 5 2 



Finland 
Italy 
Japan 
France 



Switzerland 2 1 



China 4 

South Korea 2 

Czech Republic 1 

Sweden 1 




Belarus 

Bulgaria 

Denmark 

Ukraine 

Australia 

Belgium 

Kaukstan 



Tot 

25 

21 

16 

15 

14 

11 

11 

11 

10 

8 

7 

6 

4 

3 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



n •, Colleqi" Bdshntb.dl 
M.ijor Score'. 



EAST 

Boston U. 69, Tmvson 63 
Canisius 73, Fairfield 61 
Faideigh Dickinson 83, Monmouth, N.J. 65 



lona80,Marist65 

Long Island U. 86, St. Francis, NY 71 

Md.-Baltimore County 84, Liberty 69 

Northeastern 72, Delaware 62 

Rider 66, St. Peter's 65 

St. Francis, Pa. 77, Mount St. Mary's, Md. 67 

Temple 68, St. Bonaventure 45 

Wagner 85, Cent. Connecticut St. 72 

SOUTH 

Cent. Florida 82, Campbell 52 
Cincinnati 93, Ala -Birmingham 76 
Coll of Charleston 67, Stetson 53 
Davidson 68, Appalachian St. 58 
[.Kentucky 55, Middle Tenn. 54 
E.TennesseeSL78,VMI66 
Fla. International 79, Centenary 71 
Furman 72, Belmont 56 
Jacksonville St. 86, Mercer 80 
Murray St 86, Austin Peay 78 
New Orleans 78, Louisiana Tech 34 
NichollsSt.87,McNeeseSt.80 
SE Louisiana 73, Sam Houston St. 70 
SW Louisiana 81, Lamar 74 
Samford 85, Georgia St. 62 
South Florida 73, Houston 56 
Tennessee St 68, Tenn -Martin 53 
Tennessee Tech 77, Morehead St. 72 
Troy St. 91, Florida Atlantic 64 
Wake Forest 83, MaryUnd 79 
Winthrop 62, Coastal Carolina 52 
Wofford91,Toccoa Falls 63 

MIDWEST 

Akron 68, Kent 51 

Ill-Chicago %, Cleveland St. 72 

Indiana 74, Ohio St. 72 

Marquette 57, Louisville 52 

NE Illinois 73, S.Utah 72 

Oral Roberts 105, Chicago St. 75 

Valparaiso 70,Youngstown St. 68 

W. Illinois 68, Buffalo 67 

Wis. Green Bay 74, Wright St. 62 

<B>SOOTHWIST<P> 

Ark -Little Rock 70, W.Kentucky 61 

Arkansas St. 87, Jacksonvile 70 

North Texas 91 , U( Santa Barbara 84 

SW Texas St,68,NE Louisiana 67 

South Alabama 87, Texas-Pan American 

54 

Texas-San Antonio 79, NW Louisiana 78 

MR WEST 

Brigham Young 79, Air Force 60 
E. Washington 85, MonUna St. 74 
N. Arizona 86, Saaamento St. 49 
New Mexico 95, Texas-El Paso 71 
New Mexico St. 90, Cal Poly-SlO 80 



Pacific 71,CalSt.-Fullerton 57 
Pepperdine 65, Gonzaga 64 



National Basketball Association 
At A Glance 



EASHRN CONFERENCE 

Atlantic Division 

W L Pet 

Miami 35 18 .657 

New Jersey 31 22 .585 

NewYorii 29 22 .569 

Washington 27 27 .500 

Oriando 26 27 .491 

Boston 24 29 .453 

PhiUdelphia 16 34 .320 



Central Division 
Chicago 40 15 



Indiana 

Charlotte 

Atlanta 

Cleveland 

Mihwaukee 

Detroit 

Toronto 



37 15 

30 22 

31 23 
28 24 
26 26 
23 29 
11 41 



.727 
.712 
.577 
.574 
.538 
500 
.442 
.212 



GB 

4 
5 

81/2 

9 

11 

171/2 



11/2 
81/2 
81/2 
101/2 
121/2 
151/2 
271/2 



WESTERN CONFERENCE 

Midwest Division 

W L 
Utah 36 15 

San Antonio 36 16 
Minnesota 28 23 



Houston 
Vancouver 
Dallas 
Denver 



27 25 

14 38 

10 43 

5 47 



GB 

1/2 
8 
91/2 
.269 221/2 
.189 27 
.096 311/2 



Pet 
.706 
.692 
.549 

.519 



Pacific Division 



Seattle 

I.A. Lakers 

Phoenix 

Portland 

Saaamento 

L.A.aippen 



Golden Sute 10 



12 
15 
16 
21 
29 
42 
41 



.769 
.718 
.686 
.596 
.453 
.208 
.196 



31/2 

41/2 

9 

161/2 

291/2 

291/2 



Ihmtiifi'timm ^ 
Chicago 123, Toronto 86 
Indiana 82, Philadelphia 77 
San Antonio 87, Dallas 81 
Houston 100, Detroit 90 
Miami 89, LA Clippers 80 
LA. Lakers 131, Denver 92 



Cleveland at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. 
Indiana at Orlando, 7:30 p.m. 



Vancouver at Atlanta, 7:30 pm. 
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m. 
Toronto at Milwaukee, 9 p.m. 
Chariotte at Phoenix, 9 p.m. 
New Yori( at Portland, 10 p.m. __ 
Boston at Seanle, 10 p.m. 
Denver at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. 
Miami at Sacramento, 10:30 pm. 

Saturday's GaiMS 

Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. 
Chicago at Washington, 8 pm. 
Detroit at Dallas, 8 30 p.m. 
Utah at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. 
Charlotte at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m 

Sunday's Gamn 

Houston at New Yori(, 1 p.m. 
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 2:30 p.m. 
Vancouver at Toronto, 3 p.m. 
LA. Lakers at Oriando, 3:30 p.m. 
Sacramento at Minnesota, 330 p.m. 
Indiana at Philadelphia, 6 pm. 
Denver at Seattle, 8 pm 
San Antonio at Phoenix, 8 pm. 
Miami at Golden State, 8 p.m. 
Boston at Portland, 10 p.m. 

AR times in the sports box art EOT. 



Transactions 



Major Leafuc BascbaR 

CLEVELAND INDIANS— Extended their 

player development affiliation with Akron 

of the Eastern League through the 2002 

season. 

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS— Agreed to 

terms with C Jorge Fabregas on a two 

year contract. 

ATLANTA BRAVES— Agreed to terms with 

IB Randall Simon on a one-year contract. 

CINCINNATI REDS- Agreed to terms with 

INF Pokey Reese on a one year contract. 

National Raifcttbal AssodaliM 

CHICAGO BULLS— Traded F Jason Caffey 

to the Golden State Warriors for F Dawd 

Vaughn and second round draft picks in 

1998 and 2000 

LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS— Traded G Brent 

Barry to the Miami Heat for C Isaac 

Austin, G Charles Smith and a 1998 No 1 

draft choice. Placed G James Collins on the 

injured list. 

WASHINGTON WIZARDS— Signed G 

Lawrence Moten to a second 10-day con- 



National FootbaN League 

ATLANTA FALCONS— Re-signed OL Scott 
Adams. 

CAROLINA PANTHERS— Signed LB Ernest 
Dixon to a one-year contract. 
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS— Signed DL William 
Carr, RB Keith Elias, DL Donnie Embra, OL 
Steve Hardin, OL Brandon Hayes, OL 
Waveriy Jackson, OL Jason Johnson, OL 
Bryan Jurewicz,WR Levi Kealaluhi,WR 
Kaipo McGuire, OL Larry Moore, DB Nakia 
Reddick, DB Steve Rgsga, WR Mitchell 
Running, OL Tom Myslinski and 06 Clifton 
Shamburger. 

NEW YORK JETS— Signed C Kevin Mawae. 
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS— Agreed to terms 
with DE Gabe Wilkins and TE Irv Smith. 
WASHINGTON REOSKINS—Re signed G 
Joe Patton to a five-year contract. 

National Hodicy League 

CALGARY FLAMES Assigned RW Martin 
St. Louis to Saint John of the AHL and RW 
Burtie Murphy to Cleveland of the !HL. 
CAROLINA HURRICANES— Signed C 
Sergei Fedorov to an offer sheet. 
LOS ANGELES KINGS— Assigned D Ruslan 
Batyrshin to Grand Rapids of the IHL. 
NEW YORK RANGERS— Named John 
Muckler coach. 

PHOENIX COYOTES— Recalled f Shane 
Doan and F Brad Isbister from Springfield 
of the AHL. 

C0LLE6E 

NEW MEXICO STATE— Signed Lou 
Henson, men's basketball coach, to a four- 
year contract. 

SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI— Signed Jeff 
Bower, football coach, to a four-year con 
tract 



1 What NBA player amassed 20,000 
points in his 499th game, the quickest in 
history? 

2 What was the lowest point total ever 
recorded by a winning NBA team? 

3. Who was the sixth pick in the 1978 NBA 
draft? 



PJ«*J»1E 

61 Z 

uieijaqujpq) i|!M I 



Daily Bruin Sports 



Friday, February 20, 1998 25 



HISTORY 



From page 22 



"When you look at the list of the 15 
greatest players, you see that those are 
some terrific players on that list. 

"Most people don't even know that 
Jackie Joyner Kersee (Olympian track 
star) played basketball at UCLA. She 
didn't just play, she was terrific." 

Kersee was known as a defensive 
stopper when she played, from 1980- 
1984. But she did contribute on the 
offensive end, averaging 9.6 points and 
6.2 rebounds per game. 

Kersee, who is arguably the greatest 
female athlete of all time, is not the only 
celebrity who will attend on Saturday. 

"1 am overwhelmed at who's going 
to be here," head coach Kathy Olivier 
said. Olivier has been involved in the 
program as a head coach or assistant 



for 12 years. "1 am in awe. Hopefully 
our (current) players will understand 
what this means." 

The team's current All-American 
candidate, Maylana Martin, who one 
day hopes to make the honored list, 
understands what it means to have 
these legendary Bruins at the game. 

"It means a lot just to have them 
there," Martin said. "They paved the 
way for us. They did something that no 
other UCLA team has been able to do 
(win a national championship). It's 
going to be fun to meet them." 

Olivier knows exactly how well these 
Bruins played in their heyday. She 
played against most of them while play- 
ing for UNLV and Cal State Fullerton 
between 1978 and 1982. 

"To be honest, I played against all of 
them ... I'd like to forget that time 
because they all kicked our butts," 
Olivier said. "They were awesome back 



TOP 15 GAEATiST PLAYERS 



Thel 5 greatest players in UCLA women's 
basketball history will be honored tomorrow. 



ISPIayw _ 

Ann Meyers 

Anita Orte ga 
SheJb Adams 



AnneDnn-Gardner 




Ibvsee 
Or. Karen Nash 
llehena Stephens 

Necie Thompson 
$M&aVanEmbricqs 
Natalie Williams 



Years at UCLA 
1975-1978 
1978-1981 
1976-1979 
1977-1980 
Stats unavailable 
1990-1993 
1983-1986 
1985-1988 
1981-1984 
1981-1985 
1975-1977 
1990-1992 
1981-1983 
1987-1990 
1991-1994 




Stats unavailable 
11.8 



4.9 



110 

217 

16.5 

1 

20.4 



SoMctt: UCU SowiB Inhrawtlon 



in their time." 

But before one speaks of the 15 
greatest players of .all time, one needs 
' to talk about the coach that made most 
of these players into the placers they 
were. Legendary coach Billie Moore 
was at the helm of the program for 16 
years. In 1978, her first season at 
UCLA, she captured the program's 
first and only national title. 

"Without her, UCLA women's bas- 
ketball wouldn't be where it is tcxiay," 
said Olivier, who was an assistant to 
M(X)re for seven years. 

"She's a phenom. She has done so 
much for women's basketball - not just 
for UCLA, but everywhere. She is 
someone I look up to as much as I look 
up to my mother." 

Among Moore's many impressive 
stats are her 296 wins, which put her 
near the top for most victories in 
women's basketball history. She also 
took the Bruins to the NCAA tourna- 
ment for six years. 

"She's nationally known and nation- 
ally respected," Walker said. 

"A lot of coaches even now look to 
her for guidance to help build their pro- 
grams - both men's and women's." 

Anne Meyers and Denise Curry are 
two of the most prominent members of 
the alkime team. Both have left an 
indelible mark on UCLA women's bas- 
ketball history. 

Meyers, a point guard, averaged 
17.4 points and 8.4 rebounds per game 
in her Bruin career. Those were num- 
bers that put her in both the Naismith 
and UCLA Basketball Hall of Fame. 
She was also selected 1978 women's 
basketball College Player of the Year 
when she led her squad to the title. 

Meyers is currently a commentator 
for the Women's National Basketball 
Association on NBC and also does 
play-by-play for other women's basket- 
ball games on ESPN. 

Denise Curry was Meyers' front- 



JOHNSON 



From page 22 



ERNEST LEEA)aily Brum 



Se« HISTORY, page 26 



Bruins were not supposed to win. 

But, with tenacity, determination 
and a strong will to survive, the 
Bruins were able to fill in the gaps 
left by Davis and McCoy by playing 
like a family 

Ironically, the loss of Jelani 
McCoy is probably the best thing 
that has happened to the basketball 
team since the freshman duo of Earl 
Watson and Davis. 

I am not saying that McCoy ham- 
pered the team or that he was not a 
great contributor. Obviously, he was 
an excellent inside player who 
stepped up whenever the team need- 
ed leadership, not to mention he's a 
hell of an athlete. ■ ■ , 

However, McCoy's absence gave 
the Bruins the much needed determi- 
nation to focus and pull together at a 
time when they neecied to most. 

This was evident in the USC 
game. The Bruins had to deal with 
freshman phenom guard Davis well 
before the end of regulation, yet the 
Bruins still managed to come away 
with the win. 

Many critics have already predict- 
ed that McCoy's loss is going to hurt 
the Bruins' chances throughout the 
rest of the season. In fact, several 
sports writers and newspapers are 
already predicting that because of 
this major loss, the team is going to 
get slaughtered against Duke. 

I beg to differ. If the Bruins look 
at the way they beat USC and funda- 
mentally realize how they overcame 
all obstacles and stuck together to 
pull ofTone of their most impressive 
wins ever, then they definitely have 
what it takes to beat Duke. 

Perhaps the best way to under- 
stand my rationale is to think of a 
child leaving home for the first time. 
When he leaves, he takes one of the 



biggest steps in his life toward gain- 
ing his own independence. The par- 
ents have given him the tools to sur- 
vive. Now, all he has to do is apply 
the skills and learn to live and think 
for himself Similarly, the Bruins 
have lost scjmeone who they care a 
great deal about. 

Considering this, the Bruins have 
two choices. They could either con- 
tinue to lament the loss of McCoy, or 
they can accept the loss as a positive 
stepping stone toward bringing 
unity, love and stability back to the 
team. By choosing the latter option, 
the Bruins will regain those attribut- 
es that are required for becoming 
champions. 

What the Bruins did against USC 
was great. Most, if not all, of us felt 
as though we were going to wipe out 
the Trojans, partly because they 
suck,and partly because we have 
handed them a beating for seven 
consecutive times. 

But, the Trojans played with dig- 
nity. They did not want to lose 
against the Bruins (which was wish- 
ful thinking), and they demonstrated 
this by sticking together and not giv- 
ing up. 

This was a challenge to our team. 

But the Bruins accepted the chal- 

lenge and demanded the respect that 
has made UCLA one of the top bas- 
ketball programs in the nation. 

Yes, Jelani McCoy's loss is a sig- 
nificant loss to our basketball pro- 
gram, in the same )vay a child is a 
significant loss to a family when he 
leaves his parents' home. 

No matter what, they will both 
survive, because Jelani still has love 
and respect from his teammates and 
family members, just as the child 
who leaves home will always have his 
parents. 

As the No. 12 Bruins prepare to 
travel to North Carolina to face the 



See JOHNSON, page 26 



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26 Friday, Febfuary20J998 



Daily Bruin Sports 



HISTORY 



From page 25 



court mate. Curry dominated in her 
four years at UCLA, averaging a 
school record 24.6 points and 10.1 
rebounds per game on her way to 
3,098 points, also a school record. 
Like Meyers, she is an inductee into 
both basketball Halls Of Fame. 

Curry is currently a head coach at 
California State Fullerton. 

"I just remember Denise always 
complaining," Olivier said. "I remem- 
ber turning to her and telling her, 
'What are you crying about ... ?' She 
was a machine. 

"I remember Anne (Meyers) say- 
ing to me in my freshman year when I 
was frustrated, it's okay, you are 
going to be good someday.' UCLA 
women's basketball was big time." 

Natalie Williams, another promi- 
nent player, played more recently in 
the program. 

From 1990-1994 Williams scored 
on opponents at will. Her 20.4 career 
points per game rank her second all- 
time only to Curry. Her 12.8 boards a 
game put her as the UCLA record 
holder. For her spectacular play, 
Williams was selected Pac-10 
Conference Female Athlete of the 
Decade in February of 1996. 



Williams' Bruin career didn't stop 
at basketball, as she excelled at volley- 
ball as well. She is the only Bruin to 
ever receive All-American awards in 
those two sports. 

Although Williams has stopped 
playing volleyball, her storied basket- 
ball career has been reborn as an All- 
Star in the American Basketball 
League for the Portland Power. 

"Anne and Denise were four-time 
All-Americans," Olivier said, when 
asked to pick the best players to ever 
come out of the program. "They 
made everyone around them better. 

"Natalie Williams has to be up 
there also because of her sheer athlet- 
ic ability. Right now she will probably 
get the MVP of the ABL, which is 
amazing for someone who came into 
UCLA really a volleyball player. She's 
got to be up there with Anne and 
Denise." 

But the list of stellar Bruin 
women's hoops players doesn't stop 
with these three, or even with the 1 5 
selected for Saturday. It also contains 
the many role players who also helped 
the program. 

These players' contributions to 
their alma mater haven't stopped on 
the basketball court, as they have con- 
tinued to contribute to the prograrh. 
Some have elected to continue their 
careers on campus, as has Tami 



Breckenridge, a UCLA assistant ath- 
letic director. Some just return every 
now and then to lend a hand, like 
Williams, who returns to help out the 
post games of some of the forwards 
on the team. 

These players haven't stopped con- 
tributing to the program just because 
they no longer wear blue and gold on 
the court. 

"We have been surrounded by peo- 
ple from that championship team," 
Walker said. 

"Certainly their continued involve- 
ment and support in our program has 
led us to the point where we are stall- 
ing to see some success of our own 
now. It is all built on what they did in 
the past." 

This support has helped the current 
Bruins make some history of their 
own, as they have raced out to the best 
start to a Pac-10 season in school his- 
tory as the team is currently in second 
place at 10-3 in conference. 

Saturday's game is about honoring 
the countless contributions these play- 
ers have made to the UCLA women's 
basketball program. 

"It s all a part of what we think is 
important." Walker said. 

"It's not just about being on the 
court, its about after you leave here 
continuing to be a Bruin. It's all part 
of what Saturday is all about." 



JOHNSON 



From page 25 

Blue Devils, they already know that 
they have their hands full. No one 
needs to tell them that they will be 
playing against the No. 2-ranked team 
in the nation. They already know this. 

But what the Bruins need to do is 
meditate on how they pulled together 
against USC Wednesday night and 
realize that they are a winning team, 
not because they won by having more 
points but because they have taken 
that first step toward rehabilitating 
themselves and gaining the indepen- 
dence that will make this team the 
stuff legends are made of 

If the Bruins can keep their heads 
about them and stay focused with the 
same tenacity and determination that 
they displayed against USC, then 
Duke will definitely have their hands 
full - and possibly deal with the reality 
of losing to a team that has become a 
real family. 

Stan Johnson is the sports editor of the 
Daily Bruin who empathizes vy^th Jelani 
McCoy. He can be reached at sjohn- 
son@media.ucla.edu for questions, 
comments or criticisms. He is also a die- 
hard basketball fan and is happy that 
Steffi Graf is back on the WTA (tennis) 
tour. 



GYMNASTICS 

From page 24 

competing her. but we want her to heal 
as much as possible before we bring her 
back in. Luisa has a more severe sprain, 
and hopefully we will have her back by 
Regionals. 

_ "Take into account that those two 
will be back for us at Nationals, it has 
actually been a good thing. It has 



allowed us to compete our entire team 
and give those athletes that do not get a 
lot of competitive experience more 
experience, and they have done great. 
It is like the season is choreographed, 
just how I would have choreographed it 
myself." 

"Overall, we have had to work 
through some difficult times with 
injuries and sickness," Fong said. "We 
are on the upper climb towards the Pac- 
10 and our championship season. I 



think we are on a good track to get to 
the NCAA. I think that everyone4ias 
stepped it up a little bit because we have 
different people competing on differ- 
ent events that they do not compete 
on." 

UCLA is already halfway through 
the regular season, with only four 
meets left until Regionals. The Bruins 
are used to starting off slow and 
although they are ahead of themselves 
compared to last year's team, the 



team's talent is still developing. 

"We start off so slowly, as everyone 
in the world knows." Kondos said. 
"For our talent, we are still starting off 
slowly but we are about four weeks 
ahead of where we were last year, score 
wise and only having one fall last meet. 
So, I think we are going to see a team at 
the end of Regionals and Nationals 
that is going to beat any other UCLA 
team we have had here, and we have 
had some great teams." 



W.BASKETBALL 

From page 23 

Bruins squeaked through with a 
68-64 victory. The Trojans had a 
' chance to push the game into 
overtime, but failed on a three- 
point try by Kristin Clark, who 
finished the game with 25 points. 
Some Bruin free throws sealed 
the deal. 

"We need not to play like we 
did last time against them," 
Martin said, who is coming off 
arguably her best game as a colle- 
giate. Saturday against Cal, she 
was a nearly perfect 14 of 16 from 
the floor and finished the game 
with 28 points and 7 rebounds. 

"We need to come out and 
show them what kind of a ball 
club we really are. We didn't play 
the best game against them. We 
can't let them take us out of our 
game again." 

Not only will the top 15 players 
of all time be in attendance, but so 
will many other onlookers, as 
Olivier expects a big crowd. 

"I've been hearing that it is 
going to be a bigger crowd than 
Stanford, which is just great for 
women's basketball," Olivier 
said. The team had a school 
record 5,662 in the stands when 
they played Stanford at home this 
year. 

"It's good for women's basket- 
ball to get that kind of a fan base." 

But the big crowd and the half- 
time festivities could all be ruined 
by a scrappy Trojan team on 
Saturday. 

"Hopefully our players will 
step up and have a tremendous 
afternoon because that would cap 
off the celebration of the 15 great- 
est players and the national cham- 
pionship team coming back," 
assistant coach Pam Walker said. 



m 

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Daily Bruin Classified 



Friday, February 20, 1998 27 



CLASSIFIED 



index 



Announcements 



lino Gaanui HMMMnlBai 
1200 CamiMis Orsaaiawms 
1300 CanJMit ReqniitiiMMrt 
1400 CuMMt Services 
1500 Mrthdayt 
1000 LeoafnoUcet 
1700 Lest* Found 
1800 lUscallanlous 
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2000 ParsoiMis 
2090 Pragnanqr 
2100 RacraatlonalAclMtfes 
2200 Research SiiMects 
2300 Sperm /Eofl Donors 
2400 TtefcstsOftarsd 
2500 TIciwIs Wanted 
2000 wanted 



For Sale 



2700 Appliances 

2800 Art /Paintings 

2900 Blcydes/ Skates 

3000 Books 

3100 Calling Cards 

3200 Cameras / Camcorders 

3300 CoNedMes 

3400 Computers / Software 

3500 Furniture 

3600 Garage /Yard Sales 

3700 Health Products 

3800 MIscellankNis 

3900 Musteal bistniments 

4000 Office Equipment 

4100 Pets . 

4200 Rentals 

4300 Sports Equipment 

4400 Stereos/ TVs /RadkM 

4500 Table Sports 



Transportation 



4600 Auto Accessories 
4700 Autoinswance 
4800 Auto Repair 
4900 Autos for Sale 
5000 Boats for Sale 
5100 Motorcycles for Sale 
5200 Parking 

5300 Scooter /Cyde Repair 
5400 Scooters for Sale 
8600 Vehfcles for Rent 



Itavel 



5600 Resort i/ Hote ls 
6620 RMes Offered 
8640 Rides Wairtad 
8060 Taxi/ Shuttle Servtee 
8680 Hmei Destinathms 
8700 Travel Tickets 
8720 VBcaoon packages 



5800 1-000 nmnbers 
5000 BoandalAid 
6000 Insurance 
6100 Computer / Internet 
6150 Foreign Languages 
6200 HeaMi/ Beauty Services 
6300 Legal Advke/ Attorneys 
6400 Movers /Storage 
6500 Music Lessons 
6800 Personal Servtoes 
6700 PrefesskNUi Servk»s 
6800 Resumes 
6900 Telecommunications 
7000 Tutoring Offered 
7100 TMering Wanted 
7200Tmtog 
7300 vMigHeip 



Employ ment 



7400 Business Opportunities 
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7600 Child Care Offered 
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8000 Internship 
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8300 Vohmteer 



Housing 



8400 Apartments for Rent 

8500 Apartments Furnished 

8800 Condo / Tbwnhouse for Rent 

8700 Condo / Townhouse for Sale 

8800 Guesthouse for Rent 

8900 House for Rent 

8000 Houseforsale 

8100 Houseboats for Rent /Sale 

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9600 Roommates - Private Room 

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1100-2600 




EXPLORE CAREER 

OPTIONS IN 
COMMUNICATIONS 

Tuesday, February 24 from 7pm-9pm in 
Kerckhotf's Grand Salon Sponsored by 
Asian Amerk:ans in Communk:atk}n Hear 
various professionals from radk), newspaper 
and magazines speak about their careers 
Great way to learn nrxire about exciting fiekJs 
and to network with current professtorwis! 



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SUNGl -^OUND FrkJay the 13th near 

Hilgard and the entrance to UCLA Holding 
at 118 Kerckhoff Hall between our business 
hours of 9-4 M-TH or 9-2 30 F. 

SUNGLASSES FOUND on Fnday between 
IZrlpm on Hilgard Ave Pck up at 118 
Kerckhoff Hall (The Daily Bruin) at the wind- 
ow. 




FREE CASH GRANTS! 

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bills. Never repay Toll Free: 1-800-218- 
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Send your story and 
appear in TV pilot. 

200 wds. or less about something 
unexplainabie that happened to 

you, i.e. touched by an angel type 

stories or story in the vain of 
Chicken Soup stories. Deadline: 
February 25th. Send attention: 
Stephanie fax: 818.991.2024 
e mail: youmag@earthlink.net 
•please include: name, age and 
telephone #. Authors of stories 
chosen will appear in TV pilot. 




UNIVERSITY CREDIT 
UNION 

UCLA STUDENTS, faculty and staff: benefit 
from low-cost finarKial servk:es & on<am- 
pus ATMs. Visit us at Ackerman A-level, on- 
line at www.ucu.org or call 310-477-6628 




"THE DAILY BRUIN ASSUMES NO RE- 

spoNsiBiLrry for advertisers' or 

CUSTOMERS' EXPERIENCES CONCERN- 
ING ADS IN THE PERSONALS SECTION. 

ARE YOU A... 

Preppie? Surfer? Gap? Babyfaced All-Amer- 
ican? Bisexual? Curious? Ctoseted Gay? 
Nervous about your peers? I've been there 
Hartdsome, 15-year k>cal professional, well- 
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BODY WEIGHT&HOR- 
MONE LEVELS 

VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT Healthy young 
women, ages 17-25. weight between 
80&120lbs.. with normal periods, to partici- 
pate in a UCLA project to take 24hrs. 
Receive $25.00 for complete pank:ipation 
Dr. lanYipO310-206-1987. 



FEMALE RESEARCH SUBJECTS needed 
for study on migralne&t}ehavk>r Partk:ipants 
will receive a packet containing question- 
naire $10 will t>e offered after return of com- 
pleted questionare. Qualified partKipants will 
currently have mM/no headache&have been 
diagrwsed by their doctors as having had 
severe migrane in the past. Leave 
nanwAaddress. 31 0-208-7 187vo«cemail557 

HEALTHY MALES/FEMALES. 18-70 need- 
ed for study by UCLA Nuclear Medk:ine Phy- 
sicians. Small amounts of radioactivity 
$25/hr plus parking. Up to 4 hrs. 310-825- 
1118. 

NORMAL HEALTHY CHILDREN 8-12yrs 
needed for UCLA research study Receive 
$25 for lab expennwnt and devetopmental 
evaluation, and get a scientifk: learning ex 
perience Call 310-825-0392. 

POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN 45+(healthy 
or heart disease) wanted for study on coro- 
nary artery Disease-UCLA $25/hr. Up to 8 
hours. 310-825-1118. 

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED (M&F) 18-20 years 
of age for a study on bone health Will re- 
ceive $50 plus free nutritional, t)one density 
and strength assessment, and comprehen- 
sive blood analysis Please call the UCLA 
Osteoporosis Center at 310-825-6137. 




ANONYMOUS sperm d( p 

infertile couples while receiving financial 
compensation up to $600/month and tree 
health screening Convenient hours, located 
in Westwood. Call Masie 310-824-9941 

EGG DONORS NEEDED 

Have you consktered helping an infertile 
couple? It you're 21-30 years and willing to 
help, please call All races needed Compen- 
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EGG DONORS/SURROGATES NEEDED 
Ages 21-30. All info confktontial. Please call 
310-285-0333. 




PUTTING 

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Are you or is sonrwone you know 18-^ years old and suffering from Anxiety? You 
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28 Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin Classified 




EGG DONORS 
WANTED 

If you are a healthy 

female between 

the ages of 19 and 

30 and have health 

Insurance. 

Compensation 
SgW O.O O 

Call MIrna Navas at 
(310) 829-6782 



nUPINO OR CHINESE 

WOMEN NEEDED 

as anonymous egg donors. 

Ages 19-32. Egg donors find it 

emotionally rewarding to help 

anonymous infertile couples. 

$4000 compensation. 

Call l-SSMU-EGGS, Kellie 
Snell, Creative Conception. 



bk 



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FILIPINO OR CHINESE WOMEN NEEDED 
as anonymous egg donors Ages 19-32 Egg 
donors find it enrwtionally rewarding to help 
anonymous infertile couples Procedure is 
scheduled around Spring Break, but you 
must attend orientation noW $4,000 com- 
pensation Call 1-888-4 11 -EGGS, Kellie 
Snell, Creative Conception 

JEWISH EGG DONOR 

We are looking for a Jewish egg donor Can 
you help us? If you can. call 310-828-5788 

SPECIAL EGG DONOR NEEDED! Loving 
infertile couple is hoping to find a compas- 
SK>r>ate woman (o help us have a baby. 
We're hoping for someone who has blond or 
brown hair and blue eyes We'd be delighted 
to find a healthy, intelligent, college student 
or graduate. Age 21-30. Thank you tor your 
consideration Compensation $3,500- 
$5000+expenses. if you can help us, please 
call 1-800-886-9373 ext 6733. 



for sale 




2700 - 4500 




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MATTRESS SETS!!! 

Twin $79, Full $89, Queen $139, King $159, 
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87 VW JETTA. 4-door Silver, sunroof, CD- 
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88 TOYOTA MR2 Must sell 5-speed, AC, 
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SEIZED CARS from $175 .^Porsches, Cadil- 
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•81 MAZDA RX7: sky blue. 34.000 miles 
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new paint )ob $2000 Call 818-793-2785 

'83 280ZX Original owner, full power, excel- 
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$6,900 A real beauty! Good tires and 
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'94 VOLKSWAGON JETTA GL 5 speed Ex- 
cellent condition $8990 Please call 
Zain© 31 0-477-661 2 

•97 HONDA CIVIC HX Red, 2door, auto, 
A/C. cassette, power window/doorlocks, 
alarm. Low miles Perfect Must Sell 213- 
506-2063 

88 TOYOTA MR? Musi sen 5 speed AC 
Sunroof exiias Super clean $3,950 oDo 
Gal: Sieonen 8l8 504-1177 



1985 YAMAHA 125Z Black Only 6000 
miles Perfect condition Sold w/ gloves, hel- 
met&lock $800 Call Fabnce 818-246-3853 

1 986 HONDA ELITE 1 50cc Red, mint condi- 
tion basket $350obo. Call Paul at 626-237- 
9721 





SOLO FLEX witly butterfly and leg extensron 
$400 or best offer Contact Patrick at tncks- 
taOuclaedu or 310-354-0335. 




STARS CAROL BRUNETT. Roma Downey, 
and John Dye. Reveal ttie key elements in 
becoming a professional actof! Order the 
video The Actor's Success Factor' rwwl 
www gravityfebel.com or call 435-655-7552. 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



GREAT FOR SPRING BREAK I wo ticKets. 
LA to Orlando or Fori Lauderdale $200ea. 
21 2-946-1173. 

LOW AIRFARES Don^estic A International 
http7/www.travel-about com 520-327-1879 



MEXICO OR HAWAII only $250rA Europe 
$239o/w Other worldwide-destinations 
cheap ONLY TERRORISTS GET YOU 
THERE CHEAPER! AirTech 212-219-7000. 
1-800-575-TECH www.ainech.com 




SPRING BREAK!!!! 

ROSARITO BEACH MEXICO Hotel pack- 
ages $34&up 1-888-PICANTI Space limit- 
ed 



services 



•inM^' 




5800 - 7300 



'^iMPI 



BEST MOVERS. 213-263-2378 Licensed, 
insured Lowest rates Fast, courteous, and 
careful. Many students moved lor $98. Lic- 
T-163844 NO JOB TOO SMALL" 

HONEST MAN W/14ft truck and dollies, 
small jobs, short notice ok Student discount 
310-285-8688 SF, LV. SD, AZ. Go Bruins. 

JERRYS MOVING & DELIVERY The care- 
ful rrwvers. Experienced, reliable, same day 
delivery. Packing, boxes available. Jerry, 
310-391-5657. GO UCLA!! 



MATH TUTORING/CONSULTING by Ph D. 
Chemistry, Physics, English Elementary thru 
graduate school Post-Ph D WLA 310-398- 
693 

UCLA ENGLISH ALUMNI, pro-wnter, young, 
superb papers guaranteed. High school and 
below welcome Jeff 213-653-2240. 




WRITING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Stanford University 
graduate. Help with Englisli — for students of 
all ages/levels. $15/hr. 310-472-8240 or 
310-440-0285. 




$CASH FOR COLLEGES 

GRANTS & SCHOLARSHIPS avail, from 
sponsors!!! Great opportunity. Call now: 1- 
800-532 -6890. 

STUDENT LOANS 

Choose University Credit Union to fund your 
Stafford Loans (Lender Code 832123). Also 
receive low-cost financial sen/k»s. 310- 
477-6628; httpi/Zwv^w. ucu.org 



DRUM LESSONS 

All levels/styles with dedicated professional. 
At your home or WLA studio 1st lesson free. 
No drum set necessary. Neil 213-654-8226. 

GUITAR INSTRUCTION. 15 years EXR all 
levels and styles. Patient and organized. 
Guitars available. Sam 310-826-9117. 

GUITAR LESSONS by professional near 
UCLA. All levels, guitars avail. Call Jean at 
310-476-4154. 

THE BETTER PIANO LESSONS- Jazz & 
Classcal Music- European Instructor- Inter- 
national teaching experience. All Ages/Lev- 
els. Leave message at: 310-307-3012. 

VOICE LESSONS. Eastman grad. 10-years 
European operatic experience. Free the 
beauty of your voce through good vocal 
technique $40/hr 310-470-6549. 




SAT-TUTOR, English instructor needed tor 
private school. ASAP, contact Doctor 
Kim ©81 8-725-9797. 






INSURANCE WAR! 

WE'LL BEAT ANYONES price or don't want 
your business. All drivers Newly licensed. 
Student/staff/faculty discounts Request the 
"Bnjin Plan." 310-777-8817 or 213-873- 
3303. 



Debt CofTSOlidotion. Auto Loons. 

Low Interest. Bod credit. 

Bankruptcies Accepted. 

Employment Required. 

Fast Response on Approved 

Applications. 

1-888-281-5110 



/lllstate 

\I(nA« in 0ood hands. 

Irtsurance Company 
(310)312-0204 

1281 WostNA/ood Blvd. 
C2 talks So or Wllshiire) 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 

Al s u t i jU Ll!> , T hoBo a ^ i asu i lul ions. 

Personal StelBmerte. Proposais and Books. 

Intemabcnal students weloome. 

SINCE 196S 

Sharon Bmt, Ph.D. (310) 4704662 



lO+YRS EXPERIENCE 

Word Processing, Transcription, Resumes, 
Application Typing, Editing, Notary & Morel 
Legal/Medical-Mac/IBM. Student Discount. 
Near UCLA. 310-312-4858. 

ALL WP & RESUMES 

RESUME DEVELOPMENT, APPLICA- 
TIONS, LETTERS. EDITING/PROOFREAD- 
ING. FORMATTING DISSERTATION/THES- 
ES. DISCOUNT FOR PAPERS. RUSHES. 
ACE AWARDS. ETC. 310-820-8830. 

DESIGNER'S ORIGINAL- Wor* Processing 
Services; Tape Transaction, Business 
Letters, Journals, Scripts, Term Papers, Re- 
ports. Student Discounts. 24-hours. (31 0) 
777-0893. Tshlene 



WORD PROCESSING specializing in thes- 
es, dissertations, transcription, resumes, fli- 
ers, brochures, mailing lists, reports. Santa 
Monica, 310-828-6939. Hollywood, 213-466- 
2888 




FREE FOOD/ENT. 

— http.//www.thelaweb.com. Los Angeles' 
HOTTEST internet night guide, to DINING, 
ENTERTAINMENT, and EVENTS Enter the 
SWEEPSTAKES and win 




A FREE SESSION! 

Student rates. Psychotherapy/Counseling. 
Depression, anxiety, post-traun^tic stress 
disorder Couples — Individuals Call for free 
consultation Sliding scale Liz Gould 
MFCC#32388 310-578-5957 

ALONE-STRESSEDOVERWHELMED. 
Supportive, confidential counseling Anxiety, 
depression, relationships Hypnotherapy for 
test preparation Individuals, couples West- 
wood Village Carole Chasin MA, MFCC 
310-289-4643 



ATTN: MBA, LAW, 
MED. APPLICANTS 

Frustrated developing/editing your critically- 
imporlant personal statements? Get profes- 
sional help, competitive edge from national- 
ly-known author/consultant 310-826-4445. 

JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLASS. San- 
ta Monica College Business and travel 
Starting Feb 28-t-April 25 Six Saturdays, 
9am- 12pm $75 Particjpalion encouraged 
310-452-9214. 

PRIZE-WINNING 

ESSAYIST AND FORMER PROFESSOR 

w/two Ph Ds can help you produce winning 
prose Theses, papers, personal statements 
David 310-281-6264, 805-646-4455. 

RESEARCH EDITORIAL. Word Processing, 
and complete resume services. 213-444- 
2033 



^feH^BM ll^fal 



editing, rewnting, research, transcription, 
etc. Fax, email, mail, bring work to me. 
Rushes. Student discount 818-830-1546 



employment 




7400 - 8300 




tteHiii /liiitifSwiiicei 




We Create Beautiful Smiles! 

JA riour Lmerqcntu Oervice 

Medi-vJol cx Mo»l Insurance Ploni Accepted 



DENTAL HEALTH INSTTTUTE 

'All Studenh 

& Foculty 
Membefsare 

welcome' 

First hme 
introductory 

offer with 
this coupon 

Expire i2«« Tel: (310) 475-5598 

1630 Wesfwood BlvJ., West Los AnqeUs, Beiw«-n Wilskire & Santa Monica (Free Papkinq in Reap) • 





BANKRUPTCY 

Chapter 7/11/13 GET OUT OF DEBT TO- 
DAYIII Flat fee/low cost/payment plans. 
Law offices of White & Assoc. (UCLAWSe*) 
800-420 9998/310-207-2069. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

FOR WORKS VISAS and green cards call 
experierKed immtgration attorr>ey Reason- 
able rates and free consuftations. Call 213- 
251 -9588 for attorney Doreen 

GREEN CARDfThe Easy-Inexpensive WAY! 
Visas, WorV Permits, & Labor Certification. A 
CaKforrtia Corporation Since 1962. Immi- 
gration Specialist. Call: 310-459-9200. 



Great deals everyday. 



PROFESSIONAL 
RESUMES 

ORDER BY PHONE 213-777-9885, O' call 
mobile unit direct, 818-697-4028. Pager: 
213-344-7581 http://www.online- 

labs.com/danni/res/index.htni 

WINNING RESUMES 1-hour service Our 
clients get results Open 7 days. Visa arid 
Mastercard accepted 310-287-2785. 



ADVEimSE 1 



FANfASlIC! 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY, lyr PfT mini- 
mum investment. Can earn you $ $500- 
$2,00af/mo. 24-HR message. 600-468- 
7262ext .27603. 

MAKE 2000% PROFIT 

SELLING 'HOW-TCr information by mail. 
Reprint rights to 750 Boolis. reports, manu- 
als. Free info-pack. 1-800-466-9222, ext 
789 1 24hrs. 

VENTURE CAPITAL 

For smaH business. Fax brief summary: 310- 
393-7412. 



Displa' 



Daily Bruin Classified 



Friday, February 20, 1998 29 





Al:_. . ._ .'iulp recover 

unpaid insurance claim in a major personal 
injury case. Fee negotiable. 213-874-2569. 

TEACHER ASSTNTS 

PVT, WLA School looking for capable and 
experienced teacher assistants to work with 
elementary level students, M-F, 8AM-1PM. 
Begin 02/23/98. Call: 310-476-2868 Ask for 



READ IMY LIPS!!! 



You can make $4800 In 

48 tirs. My POWERFUL 

PROGRAM can put BIG 

money in your pocket 

FAST! Hot MLM or chain 

letter. For free info call 

Macro Enterprises 

1-888-510-4549 



lELEMAREElG 

Immed,P/TPos avail 

for Westside Co. 
Easy Sales; Salary + 

Comm. DAILY 
CASH! Fun office. 

310.479.6689 



MAKE $15001 WEEKLY 



working ONLY 4hrs a day. 

No college degree 

or experience needed. 

Not MLM or chain letter. 

For free info call 

M.L ENTERPRISES 

atJ-888-510-4548 




wNM Cmii Olfoitid 



L .'LN:.UU AtiU WLLKLNU CHILDCARE by 

experienced, vivacious, mature lady. Tod- 
dlers to school-age Westside or Valley ar- 
eas References Sandra @81 8-901 -7461 

TAKE CARE OF your child in my own apt. 
$400/mo. 9-5 Registered nurse Westwood 
area. 310-575-3532. 

l^B JBL 



CHILD CARE FOR 2BOYS (8&11) M-F 3:30- 
7PM. Mar Vista. Responsibilities: Driving, af- 
lerschool activities, and hw. Reterences+ 
valid license needed 310-477-7171 

CHILD CARE/HOUSEKEEPING, P/T. 3- 
7pm. W&Th. Must drive 2 children, 11&15. 
310-277-7195. 

FATHERS HELPER. P/T on Weekends 
Assist w/girls 6 and 1 0. Do activities w/them. 
Computer literate. Must have own car. 310- 
553-7337. 

FEMALE, ATHLETIC, fun-loving w/child de- 
velopment background needed to work w/6- 
year-old boy weekday afternoons. 310-471- 
0804. 

NANNY afternoons and some evenings, 
valid drivers license, great references re- 
quired. About 32hrs/wk, flexible hours. WLA. 
Easy kids. 310-836-8189 

PART-TIME STUDENT to care for 3 children 
in Pacific Palisades. Must speak English and 
drive. Approx. 30 hours/week. 809-569- 
5812. 

PARTTIME SITTER, Mon, Wed, and/or Fri 
for 2 and half yr-old/lx}y. Experience, local 
references, and CDL required. 310-454- 
7490. 

RESPONSIBLE, FUN, CARING babysitter. 
3-4 afternoons for girls 4&6. Help w/after- 
school activities Female preferred w/own 
car, valid drivers lk;ense, insurance-t-refer- 
ences. $8-10/hr. Cheviot Hills 310-280- 
0253. 

WANTED NANNY- 4days/wk. For 2 chikjren 
ages 6&8. Long hours, days are flexible 
Westwood area Pay negotiable. 
Norma ©31 0-859-0345 between 10am-6pm. 






**RECEPTIONISr* 

F/T OR P/T POSITION AVAILABLE Energe- 
tic, articulate, professional, nice attitude 
Needed M, W, F or M-F Dental Orthodontic 
office in WLA and Irvine. With excellent sal- 
ary and benefit. Please call: 310-826-7494 

A LAW FIRM 

WESTWOOD-Flexible hours. Learn a lot. 
$7.50-»^. Good typing skills, computer liter- 
ate, excel experience preferred Call 310- 
475-0481 Resumes preferred 310-446- ' 
9962 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT with ac- 
counting and computer skills. PT Flexible 
hours. Pacific Palisades. We are national 
flower shippers. 310-231-0811. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: Vocational 
rehabilitation company Responsibilites in- 
clude: assist counseling staff w/general of- 
fice duties. Must be bilingual (English/span- 
ish) write and read. Highly detailed orient- 
ed/organized. Computer literate. Fax Robin: 
310-996-6760 

ADMINISTRATIVE. Approximately 22hrs/wk, 
evenings&Saturday mornings. Scheduling, 
accounts receivable, phone traffic Bilingual 
Spanish. $650+. Contact Coco: 310-479- 
8353. 

ARCHITECTURE/ENG.GRAD STUDENT 
Private party looking for architec- 
ture/eng.grad student to develop plans for 
new family home. Please call Odi: 213-933- 
2752 

ATHLETIC ATTITUDE 

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING FIRM seek- 
ing strong, motivated individuals to fill leader- 
ship and management positions. Excellent 
pay, FT/PT 310-348-9900. 

ATTRACTIVt, sell motivated, women need 
ed lor lingerie modeling. No nudity Excel 
leni compensation" Will not interfere w/s'jd 
les Chrisiine@8l 8- 545-8855 Exi 3 

ATTRACTIVE, self motivated, women need- 
ed for lingerie modeling. No nudity. Excellent 
compensation!! Will not interfere w/studies 
Chri$tine0818-545-8855 Ext 3 



BARTENDER TRAINEES NEEDED Earn 
up to $20/hr., day/eve classes, 1-2 week 
classes, -310-973-7974. International Bar- 
tender's school 



$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL MAILING our 
circulars. No experieme required. Free infor- 
mation packet Call 410-783-8279. 



CAMPUS SAFETY OFFICER Mount St 
Mary's College. 3pm- 11pm or 5pm-1am 
$6/hr to start. 310-541-7775. 



CAMPUS JOBS 

UCLA STUDENTS WANTED!! Front 
desk/customer service agent at the UCLA 
Tiverton House Hotel. WORK 15- 
20HRS/WK. $7.75/HR+ 32SHIFT DIFFER- 
ENTIAL WE WILL WORK AROUND YOUR 
SCHOOL SCHEDULE WE ARE OPEN 
24HRS! APPLY AT 900 TIVERTON AVE., LA 
90024. PHONE 310-794-Q151. FAX 310- 
794-8503. 

CARETAKER. Look after 76yr old man. Ex- 
ercise, take to pool. Must drive w/insurance 
P/T. Starting at $9. Fax resume: 310-479- 
2402. 

CASTING 

IMMEDIATELY! Extras needed for feature 
films, commercials, and music videos. Earn 
up to $240 per day! No experience needed. 
Work guaranteed! Call today 213-851-6103. 

CLERK/RECEPTIONIST Full-time for small 
busy law firm in Beverly Hills. Great hands- 
on expenence! $7/hour. Resume: PO Box 
18143 Beverly Hills, CA 90209. Or 
email:bevhillslaw@eanhlink.net 

COMPUTER SUPPORT Software support 
Win97 NT. Experience w/Access database 
MS word. Salary negotiable 20+ hrs/wk. 
310-208-2442. Fax resume: 310-208-2621. 

COMPUTER/TELECOM 

Fast growing internet company looking for 
customer service reps. Part-time 6am- 10am 
M-F, 6pm-midnight M-F, Friday&Saturday 
posititons for midnight to Sam or all hours. In- 
cludes phone sales and tech support Com- 
puter experience preferred In Westwood. 
minutes from campus. Fluency in FrerKh, 
German or Spanish a plus. Fax resume: J. 
Rowlands 310-966-1802. 

COVEL COMMONS is hiring responsible 
students for meeting room set-up crew. Must 
enjoy customer service Some lifting. 
$6.77/hr. 15-20hrs/wk. Call Felwia at 310- 
206-2842 to apply. 

CSO PROGRAM 

NOW HIRING. Positk)ns start at $7 18/hr 
with promotkKis up to $9.47/hr Must be a 
UCLA student with at least one academk; 
year remaining and a valid driver's license. ■ 
Call 31 0-825-2 1 48 for details. I 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

PfT positions at University Credit Union. Ex- 
ceHent pay, hours, ar>d working environment 
at the financial institution serving UCLA. To 
apply, fax resume to 310-477-2566 or on 
web at www.ucu.org 



DOG LOVERS NEEDED 

Urban dog playcare & training is now hinng 
for day and evening shifts. 310-445-1447 

DOG-WALKtP NEEDED Mon-Fn ade 
noons in exchange (or parking privileges 
Home- walking distance from campus Ron 
nie 310-47': 9969 



FLEXIBLE HOURS 

FILING ASST PT Century City firm. Light 
phones/typing. Heaving filing. Fax resume to 
Margarita Fox 310-785-1464 

FUN SUMMER JOBS! Gain valuable experi- 
ence working with children outdoors. We are 
looking for fun, caring. Summer Day Camp 
staff whose summer home is in the San Fer- 
nando or Canejo Valley, Vantura, Camarillo. 
Malibu, or Simi Valley. Summer salaries 
range from $2,100-3,200+ Call 818-865- 
6263 or email us at CampJobs@aol.com 

DOG-WALKER NEEDED. Mon-Fn, after- 
noons In exchange for parking privileges 
Home- walking distance from campus. Bon- 
nie: 310-474-9969. 

EXPERIENCED MULTI-TASKED RECEP- 
TIONIST needed to handle multiple lines 
Growth potential with investment banking 
firm. $8/hr. Sonia©310-444-0077. 



F/T. WRITER for immigration law firm In Cen- 
tury City. BA in English. Journalism, etc. 
Type 45wpm. Detail-oriented. Self-starter. 
Excellent writer. No legal experience re- 
quired. $11/hr. Fax Resume and writing sam- 
ple 310-553-2616. 

FILE CLERK NEEDED for Architectural firm. 
Organized person for 20-30 hours/wk. $7.00- 
8.50/hr. Resumes to Box 1211, 11301 Olym- 
pic Blvd., «1121 LA. CA 90064. 

FILE CLERK 

P/T, fast-paced. WLA medk:al offk:e. Filing 
medical records, x-rays, and general duties. 
Fax resume 310-286-2710 attn Kay 




.U\lV|ilAIf 







Cliilstian 

Alliance Church of Santa 
Monica 

1420 Yale St., Santa Monica 
310-828-7608 

Sunday morning 10:30am service. Wed. 
7pm prayer meeting, adult bible discus- 
sk>r\ 9:30am. We are a small group of 
people who desire to love and folkiw 
Jesus Christ more closely. Please come 
and join us. 

Chinese Bible Church 

1637 Butler Ave., LA 

310-478-8971 

Chinese Worship: Sunday 11am 

English Worship: Sunday 2pm 

Can't get up eariy enough for the morning 

worship? Come and check out our 2pm 

worship! 

New Heart Christian Fellowship 

1941 Barrington Ave., LA 
310-478-3059 

Meeting times: Suni 0:30am, Wed 
7:30pm. Casual attire, contemporary wor- 
ship, practical teaching. We love Bruins! 

Vineyard Christian Fellowship 

Comer of 16th & Pearl St. in Santa 
Monica, 1 bik south of Pico Blvd. 
(John Adams Middle School 



Auditorium) 
310-581-9924 

Sunday Celebration Service at 10:00am. 
DESIRING A DEEPER EXPERIENCE 
WITH GOD? Come discover the casual 
atmosphere, contemporary worship, and 
practical teaching that has led many 
UCLA students and graduates to make 
the Vineyard their "home." 



Westwood Hills Christian 
Church 

10808 Le Conte Ave.. Los Angeles 
Accross from UCLA Medical Center 
310-208-8576 Fax: 824-7577 
Dr. Myron Taylor. 1 0am Sunday Worship 
Service. Bible Study available. Fnendly 
church where no one is a stranger, only a 
friend we have not met. 



Christtan/Evangelical 

Westside Oikos Community 

Church 

1989 Westwood Blvd. (& La Grange) 
310-390-3277 

Pasture David Kim Come celebrate oor 
3rd year anniversary service with us on 
February 8, 1997 at 1:30pm. RkJe provid- 
ed Q 1pm. Sproul tum-around. Campus 
meeting Thursdays 6:30pm at 51 Kinsey. 
Wednesday riioming prayer Bam at 
church. 



Congregational 

Westwood Hills Congregational 
Church 

1989 Westwood Blvd. (& La Grange). 
LA 310-474-7327 
[WHCChurch&aol.com] or call toll 
free 888-WHCHURCH 
Pastor Olaf Hoeckmann-Percival. 10am 
worship. Open and affirming of all Chnst 
centered, spirit-filled worship. 
Conversational sermons Music to lift your 
spirit! ChikJren's church, retreats, Bible 
studies, and lots of God's Love. 

Lutheran 

Lutheran Campus Ministries 

10915 Strathmore (at Gayley), 

Westwood 

310-208-4579 

Worship: Sunday 10:30am. basketball: 

Tuesday 6:00pm. 

Timothy L. Seals, Pastor Diane Calfas, 

Campus Ministry Associate. Serving 

UCLA on behalf of ELCA and the LC-MS. 

First United Methodist Church 
at Santa Monica 

1008 11th Street, Santa Monica (3 

blocks east of Lincoln, 2 blocks north 

of Wilshire) 

310-393-8258 

Saturday night contemporary senrice with 

praise music at 5:30pm. Sunday moming 



worship services in the Sanctuary at 9 and 
11am, with full choir and organ music. 
Child care provided. Sunday School for 
children K through 5th grades at 9 and 
11am. Bible studies for youth and adults 
at 10am Special programs for Singles 
Senior Minister: Donald J Shelby, 
Associate Ministers: Se Hee Han, James 
Thomann 

Methodist 

Venice-Santa Monica Free 
Methodist Church 

4871 Centinela Ave.. LA 
310-822-8094 

Sunday Service: 9:30am, 11:15am 
College Fellowship: Fnday 7:15pm 
Looking for a spintual place away from 
home? Come join the Venice Church fami- 
ly Everyone is welcome, Jim Miyabe, Sr. 
Pastor Rides, questions? Call Wayne 
310-824-9762, wmleeQuclaedu. 

Westwood United Methodist 
Church 

900 Hilgard Ave. 
310-474-4511 

http://home. earthlink. net/- wumc 
Grace Land, an alternative worship experi- 
ence, Sundays 5 30pm in Helms Hall. 
Traditional worship Sundays 10:30am in 
the Sanctuary. Call for details of Young 
Adult activities Beautiful setting with gk)ri- 
ous music Clergy: Sharon Rhodes- 



Wickett and Jane Voigts Campus 
Ministry: Wesley Foundation at UCLA 
(10497 Wilshire Bl.), Rev Frank Wulf. 

Mormon 

The Church of Jesus Christ of 
latter-day Saints 

Westwood Meeting House: 10740 

Ohio Ave. (directly behind the 

LATemple) 

UCLA Ward Bishop's Office: 

310-474-8189 

Relief Society and Priesthood Meetings: 

Sun, 12 30pm; Sunday School (Scnpture 

Study): Sun 1:25pm; Sacrament Meeting: 

Sun, 2:30-3:40pm. 

Westwood institute of Religion 

856 Hilgard Ave. 
Office: 310-208-8836 
Sponsors Lambda Delta Sigma sorority 
and Sigma Gamma Chi fraternity. 
Provides day and night time classes in the 
Bible, Book of Mornion, and Marriage and 
Family Relationships. Call or visit for class 
schedule and information about service 
projects, dinners, graduate seminars, 
socials, activities, and free parking. 

The Religious Services Directory 
is printed every Friday. 



For advertising infi 
contact Scott Kim at 



ation, 
25-2221. 



Classilieris 
825-2221 



Need extra casti? Sell somethin 



Display 
206-3nr 



30 Friday, February 20, 1998 



Daily Bruin Classified 




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15 Manicuhst's 
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16 Leaf -gathering 
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17 "The King—" 

18 Marathoner 

19 Poet's Ireland 

20 Cooperation 
22 Concur 

24 "Butterflies — 
Free" 

25 Denominations 
27 Early morning 
31 Oddly 

35 Toes the line 

36 Ostrich's 
cousins 

38 Foot covering 

39 Currently 

40 Lingered 

43 Eggs 

44 Ceft 

46 Speech 
problem 

47 Passenger 

49 Weird 

51 Black eyes: 

slang 
53 Equals 

55 Polish — : finish 

56 Suspense writer 
Eric — 

59 Wave 

64 Poet Teasdale 

65 Thoughts 

67 Judge's 
garment 

68 Scheme 

69 Do an 
accounting job 

70 Part of speech 

71 Dispatch 

72 Christmas 
carols 

73 Chooses 



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DOWN 

1 Reporter's 33 
question 34 

2 Director Clair 

3 Verdi opera 37 

4 Chief 41 

5 Nonentities 

6 General 42 
Bradley 45 

7 Bottle parts 48 

8 Before 50 

9 New York city 52 

10 Long curls 54 

11 Tortoise's 

rival 56 

12 Similar 

13 Camper's 57 
shelter 

21 Arm part 58 
23 Sault — Marie 

26 outfits 60 

27 Ditties 

28 WWII sub 61 

29 More modem 62 

30 More uncanny 63 
32 Providence, 66 



— Island 

Sweetheart 

Periods of 

time 

Fem. title 

Resident of 

Oran 

Snowbank 

Arctic region 

Big fire 

Bom 

Lifts 

Stockholm 

native 

Cleopatra's 

snakes 

Ram or 

rooster 

-Health-food" 

muffin 

Nature's Ice 

cubes 

Henhouse 

Border ufxjn 

Writing tools 

Pair 



AJas 
forn'e 
'oiks 

Ana 

eye 

yosr 

*0r 
'ess 
'^»n 
they 

^'Ty 

- ""» 
"Ont 

"rink 

»>»ll 
^otrie 
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ardain 










»••••••• 




14 4 FAX/MODEM 


internal, new 


$15 


310206-1547 


2 LIFT TICKETS 
2 SKI LESSONS 


valid at Ski Sunnse 
valid at Ski Sunnse 


$10aa 
$10Ba 


310475-3130 
310475-3130 


23-ROAD BIKE 


Centurion 


$100 


310477-7333 


AM/FM/CD 4 CAR 


Blaupunkt, new in box 


$96 


310475-3130 


ANSWER MACHINE 


casio, new • 


$20 


3102081547 


ARM CHAIR 


good condition 


$30 


310^4-7128 


BBALLTIX 


UCLAvsAZ 


N/A 
$10 


310443-1907 


BBALLTIX 


ucia vs Arizona st. 


310-267-8790 


BBALL TIX 


ucia vs Arizona 


$20 


310-267-8790 


BMX BIKE 


phat diamond t>ack 


$70 


3102084399 


BOX SPRING W/ 


bed frame 4 mattress 


$29 


310475-3130 


CORDLESS PHONE 


bell south, white 


$10 


310208-1547 


COUCH 
COUCH 


brown leather • • 
white cloth 


$50 
$30 


310624-7128 
310624-7128 


DINING TBL 


. octagon dass top 


310-235-5180 


EPSON PRINTER 


dr/t)8w, new, stylus. 


TBA 


310208-1547 


ETHERNET CARD 


PC great 4 dorms 


$25 


310615-1593 



EXERCISE BIKE 



leg/arm rower 



$50 



310479-8684 



m 



EXSULA/IRRADESSA 
FUTON FRAME 



1/2Pnce 
couch/bed,pine,full 



310394-3700 
310479-8684 



FUTON-FULL 



black,9ood corxl 



$40 



310479-8684 



GRAPHING CALC 
JORDANS 



Casio 



$50 



3102084399 



size 101/2 bld< /white 



$90 



310-655-5135 



LOVESEAT 


small wheat-color 


$40 


310235-5180 


MATTRESS 


twin mattress 


N/A 


310208-0861 


MCAT MATERIALS 


hyperleaming new 


$30 


310-312-3036 


PAPASAN 


ofl-whit cushion, big 
5 mm from campus 


$50 


310-235-5180 


PARKING SPACE 


$50 


310208-0661 



PASADENA 



vanpool ticket 



$3.50ea 626-798-3698 



POOL CUE 



beautiful custom 



$50 



3102084399 



PORT CD PLAYER 
SAT ACT.GRE.ETC 
SCI CALCULATOR 



brand new Panasonic 

new&used 

TI-82 



310267-7979 
310477-7333 



$60 



310267-9385 



SURFBOARD 6 6" 



good condition 



$100 



310454-8398 



TABLE.2CHAIRS 



pine, good cond 



$75 



310479-8684 



Tl 85 CALCULATOR 



like new 



$66 



310-824-7572 



TWIN BED W/FRAME 
VACUUM CLEANER 



good condition 
good condition 



310313-1308 
310613-1308 



WORD PROCESSOR BrdHk, pd $350 



$65 



310209-5713 





GENERAL OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 

Immediate position available Century City 
investment banking firm Must work Thurs- 
days&Fridays, 8am-5pm witr>out exception 
Punctual, computer literate, responsible, 
dedicated, professional, hard-working, and 
detail-oriented Previous office experience 
preferred $8/hr Fax resume:31 0-788-5572, 
att.iSheri or Lili. 

GIRLS WANTED at exclusive social club in 
West LA Conversation only Flexil)le hours. 
Stan tonight, earn top $$$. 310-477-9871. 

HEALTHY GOURMET NEEDS food deltveiy 
driver. Mondays and/or Fridays Car must fit 
\Q* coolers Insurance a must At)Out $50- 
$100/day 310-829-0111. 

HERSHEY DINING SERVICES is hiring 
student and non-student workers. Flexible 
scheduling. 15-20 hrs/wk $6.36/hr for stud- 
ents $8 32/hr tor non-students. Contact Ray 
or Bruce at 310-825-7686. 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed $45,000 income potential. 
Call 1-800-513-4343 Ext B-10105. 

HOME TYPISTS 

PC USERS NEEDED. $45,000 income po- 
tential. Call: 1-800-513-4343 Ext B-10105 

INTL. CO. 

NEEDS help immedtateiy Rapidly 9ff$kn6- 
ing. No experience necessary Full training 
P/T. $500-2000. F/T $3000-6000. 310-470- 
6664. . 



KAPLAN 

SALES-Sman, ambitious, energetic people 
for our Educational Sales Department. B/A, 
1-year experierfce in sales/marketing, sen/- 
Ice-oriented, enthrived in fast-paced working 
environment. Fax cover and resume attn: 
DW 310 -209-2025. 



KINDERGARTEN PARK ACTIVITIES CO,- 
ORDINATOR. Sinai Akiba, private school 
near UCLA. M-F, 9-1 pm Must like children, 
athletics Call Jill Linder©310-475-6401, 
ext.284. 



LASER TECHNICIAN for laser tiair removal 
company in BH RN or PA (or soon-to-be 
graduate) Friendly, detail-oriented, will train 
$18-$25/hr 310-247-0999. 



LE BEACH CLUB 

AMERICAS FAVORITE TANNING resort is 
expanding&has limited«o( FT openings for 
motivated, outgoing, tanning/sales consult- 
ants Pos. are limited so call now&join LE 
BEACH CLUB, the Very Best Contact Carol 
310-704-8834. 



LIVE IN WANTED to assist with daily activi- 
ties for a healthy 86-yr/old widow. Santa Mo- 
nk;a area Must have car. 310-587-9244. 

LOUISES TRATTORIA 11645 San Vk»nte 
Blvd. Brentwood Host&counter needed 
Part-time Please apply in person between 3- 
5pm. No phone calls. 



MARKETING INTERN, J. Peterman Compa- 
ny, a national retail/direct mall catalog, is 
looking for a marketing intern. P/T, paid posi- 
tion 15-20hrs/wk. Please fax Bnnae213- 
938-6982 



MARKETING/ADVERTISING/SALES MAN- 
AGER for innovative new firm. Imaginative, 
motivated, energetic. Marketing/advertising 
experience helpful. P/T. Open salary. Call 
310-305-8680 or fax resume; 310-822-1127 

MCAT 

BIOLOGICAL and physk;al sciences semi- 
nars in March, July, and August/1998. 1-800- 
305-4415, huntdOcc umanitoba.ca 



MEN-WOMEN AGES18-26 for nude model- 
ing for magazines, fine art and videos. Call 
310-289-8941 days. 

MODELS WANTED by professional photo- 
studio for upcoming assignment. Male/Fe- 
male Pro/Non-Pro Fashion/Commer- 
cial/Theatrical. Call for appointment 818- 
986-7933. 



UCLA AnniKil Fund 



$8.1Q/HR. nusMNUS 



(Sun-Thrw iwnli n i, 2 MMi en M. t Swi iltonioon) 
CoMKt Cirlot Gotnu 

S1S-794-0277 

10B3 Gayley Avenue 4tt) fk)or, Westwood 

we are able to offer work study 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



Let over 55,000 readers know it s your friends birtfiday. 



Daily Bruin Classified 



Friday, February 20, 1998 31 




MOVIE EXTRA WORK 

REVOLUTIONARY NEW PROGRAM! Start 
right away! All types-IS-t-! Fun/Easy! No cra- 
zy fees! Program for free medical! Call- 
24/hrs 213-850-4417. 



NATIONAL PARK 
EMPLOYMENT 

Work in tfte great outdoors. Forestry, wild life 
preserve, concessionaires, firefight- 
ers&more. Competitive wages+benefits Ask 
us how! 517-324-3093 Ext. n59342 

NOT FOR THE TIMID 

OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY exists in 
Westwood Village utilities investment busi- 
ness office for serious minded telephone 
workers willing to work hard and earn an ex- 
cellent income Plus double bonuses. Flexi- 
ble hours. Call 310-203-1317. 

OFFICE ASSISTANT Part-time^ 12- 
15hrs/week, 3 days a week, flexible, 
$8.50/hr 310-209-3381. 

OFFICE ASSITANT 

Needed for marketing director P/T or F/T, 
Must have knowledge in MS Word/Excel. 
Fax resume to 310-338-3610. 

OFFICE PERSONNEL WANTED. West- 
wood driving and traffic school. Part-time Fri- 
day Saturday, and Sunday Call for informa- 
tion. 310-824-4444. 



P/T OFFICE ASSISTANT for real estate 
company close to campus. Flexible hours. 
16-20 hrs/wk., $8/hr. computer literate (MS 
Word/Excel), phone, filing, organized, reli- 
able. 310-471-0206 Ext. 15. 

PART TIME ASSISTANT to entertainment 
manager. Phones and computer expenence. 
Salary DOE. Westside location 310-473- 
8488 

PART-TIME LEAGUE 
COORDINATOR 

SPORTS-ORIENTATED, fun, reliable people 
needed to work at a^lt sports leagues. Must 
k>e 21 yrs or older. Interns also needed. Call 
for interview and wage info. 310-376-0025. 

PERMANENT F/T FILE CLERK-$8/hr. Mon- 
Fri, 9am-5:30pm. Small immigration law firm 
in Century City. Computer literate, good 
phone skills, file, phones. Position includes 
all other job related duties. Begins ASAP 
310-553-6600 or fax-31 0-553-261 6 

PERSONAL TRAINER Phys-ed major— pri- 
vate training opportunity 5 days/week, M-F 
6am start. $500/month. Fax information: 
310-476-7976. 

PRODUCTION COMPANY just completed 
first film seeks scripts for next feature pro- 
ject. Contact Alex Gayner©310-396-3828 or 
Steve Adelson© 31 0-306-2852 for more in- 
formation. 



PT DRIVERS/WAITERS 
WANTED 

FLEXIBLE HRS, GREAT work/people Driv- 
ers/waiters wanted- Pizza Hut Contact 
Nathan: 310-208-0900 

PT GENERAL OFFICE 

OFFICE/MAILCLERK-mailing, copying, fil- 
ing, phones, for large synagogue $7.00/hr. 
Permanent/Parttime. 1-5pm Mon-Fn 
Please fax resume to Wilshire Blvd. Temple 
213-388-2595 or call Yvette 213-388-2401. 

PT OFFICE ASSISTANT wanted by family- 
run real estate management company Must 
be extremely organized, computer liter- 
ate&reliable. Great working environ- 
ment/flexible hours $8/hour 213-850-5726 



RECEPTIONIST 

WEEKEND position with Law Firm 9am- 
6pm Sat-Sun Bilingual Spanish Reception, 
data entry, filing Computer literate. $15/hr. 
Fax resume 213-658-6041 

RECEPTIONIST Experienced, needed for 
new salon in Westwood. F/T Please call 
310-208-7531 

REOEPTIONIST/OFFICE MANAGER F/T 
Mon-Fri. No experience required Phones, 
computers. Excellent salary/ljenefits West- 
LA. Be part of a fantastic team! 310-476- 
4205. 

RETAIL SALES Retail sales books PT 
ChiWren book knowledge req WLA 310- 
559-2665 

STUDIO REPS NEEDED. $7-$15/hr +bo- 
nuses. P/T No experience needed Working 
w/ofher students Great P/T / F/T wori<. 213- 
882-6844 



M«Niel8 Needed Now 

No experferwe required 

For catalog, prkrlworfc, magazines, movies 

vtdeo and tv comrnercials 

|y|en arid Women of aN ages 

Free Consultation 

OUl MODEL DIVISION 

310.659.4855 




Classifieds 
825-2221 



SUMMER CAMP JOBS. Decathton Sports 
Club Palo Alto, CA $65-$80/day 6/22-8/14. 
650-365-8638 

SURROGACY: Professional couple seeks 
woman to help them have a child through 
surrogacy $20,000. 800-450-5343. 

TV. PILOT 

On Asian Culture. Seeking new talent. Fe- 
male host w/hip personality and strong com- 
munk:ation skills. Bilingual a plus. Also, male 
for physical comedy Martial arts a plus 
Lunch and great experience for one day 
shoot with possible future pay. Send picture 
and resume to: Bobby Okinaka. 510 Kings- 
ford St. Monterey Park, CA 91754 

TEACHERS NEEDED 

to teach kids computers, math, and science 
classes ASAP. Hours 2-5pm. Experience 
working with kids preferred. Great pay All 
applicants fax resume to: 310-445-5628. 

TRAVEL AGENCY SEEKS P/T office help. 
$8/hr. Computer oriented, some filing Near 
Westside Pavilion Call Mary 310-837-6119 

VOLUNTEER USHERS 

FOR GEFFEN PLAYHOUSE production of 
"Harriet's Return" staring Debbie Allen. 
Starts Jan 27. Sign-up&see it for free: 310- 
208-6500 ext. 11 5. 

WANTED ASIAN 

PT WORK MASSAGE. Great pay flex hrs. 
Will work around your school schedule. 818- 
344-1294. 

WEB SITE DESIGNERS 

Full and part time, $15/hour-(-. HTML and 
graphic design. High-end clients, great ex- 
perience, leading design studio. Apollo Inter- 
active. 310-393-5373 

WE'RE SEEKING INDIVIDUALS to provide 
support to the developmentally disabled. Call 
Dwight Istanbuliar) at 818-361-6400 ext 129. 




FINANCIAL INTERNSHIP available. Great 
opportunity to learn about investing and get 
licensed. Promotions to paid status guar- 
anteed. Call 310-629-0463 

FREE ARTS FOR ABUSED CHILDREN is 
seeking unpaid interns. Please contact Cher- 
yl at 310-313-4ART (310-313-4278) 

INTERNET COMPANY seeks computer sav- 
vy intern $ a graphic artist. Will train. 213- 
655-6300. www.eilbacher.com 

INTERNS WANTED! 

HI-RISE BUILDING PROJECT in Manna Del 
Rey now hinng paid interns for training in 
purchasing, project management, civil engi- 
neering, quality control and interior design. 
Fax one page letter/resume to Polaris CCAD 
310-301-0384 

PUBLICITY INTERNS NEEDED Dynamic, 
detailed and responsible. R&B Music clients 
Non paying, college course credit Fax re- 
sume 213-466-0391 




$750/rr>o 2-miles from campus Furnished 
Near Bus Laundry facilities Stove, refrigera- 
tor,^arpet, swimming pool 310-825-4906 or 
31 0-478-04 15(night) 

1BD-$675/SGL-$600 

WLA GARDEN COURTYARD Quiet, ap- 
pliances, blinds, etc Blue Bus 1 5mi to cam- 
pus. Ava now. 310-477-0725. 



BEVERLY HILLS ADJ 1&2-BEDROOMS 
UPPER4L0WER. $710-$925 ASK FOR 
BONUS. SOME W/HARDWOOD FLOORS, 
BALCONY. ONLY 1/2 BLOCK TO PICO 
BUS 310-839-6294 

^BRENTWOOD- 1+1 North of Sunset 1 mile 
from UCLA. Fireplace, pool, gated parking, 
and laundry In quiet and private security 
buikjing. $1195/mo 8310-476-5806. 

MAR VISTA $1,795 4-bdrm/4-bath 3-level 
townhouse Fireplace, gated garage, unit 
alarm, sundeck. Open Mon-Sat, 3954 
Beethoven st 310-391-1076 

MAR VISTA $925 2-bdrm/2-ba 2-8tory cus- 
tom townhomes Fireplace, gated garage, 
unit alarm Open Monday-Saturday 10-5 
11748 Courtleigh Dr 310-391-1076 



OVERLAND NATIONAL. Cozy, 2bdrm/1ba 
apartment. Quiet building, hardwood floors, 
refrigerator and stove. $750/mo. $700 secur- 
ity deposit. 310-458-7726. 

PALMS. $1045. 2-bed-2-bath 2-story town- 
fKHnes. Fireplace, gated garage, unit alarm, 
open 7dayc. 3614 Faris Drive. 310-391-1076 
or 310-837-0906 Manager. 

PALMS. $1150. Large 1-bdrm, 1.5-bath. Loft, 
fireplace, bakxjny, private sundeck, /VC, new 
carpet/Vyl-Near shops/fwy 310-836-6007 

PALMS $1795. 4-bd-t-loft, 3-ba. 3-level town- 
house. Fireplace, gated garage, unit alarm, 
sundeck. Open Mon-Sat, 10-5 3640 
Westwood Blvd. 310-391-1076 

PALMS $595, 1-t>edroom, entry system, 
very quiet, all appliances. Convenient to 
campus Security deposit $100. A/C, laundry. 
310-837-7061 

PALMS. Ibdrm/lba. Carpet, newly painted 
Utilities included, tear parking Center court- 
yard $575. 310-558-1782 or 310-839-8105 

PALMS. Single apt from $465-$495 1-bdrm, 
$595 Stove, refrigerator and 1 -month free 
w/year lease. $300deposit. 310-837-1502 
leave message. 

SANTA MONICA, BRENTWOOD, WEST- 
WOOD and the WESTSIDE. Over 1,000 
properties each week. LOW FEE. Westside 
Rental Connection. 310-395-RENT 
www.westsiderentals.com 

SANTA MONICA- N of Wilshire 7 blocks 
from beach Spacnus, private bachetor apt 
w/hardwood floors4large ctosets $670 in- 
cludes utilities. 310-888-8014. 

SANTA MONICA. Furnished, hardwood 
floors. $650/mo. 310-395-1284 Agent Fee 

SM RENTALS 

WE HAVE Guest Houses, Apartments, and 
Houses for rent in Santa Monica and the 
Westside! Low Fee 310-395-RENT 
www.westsiderentals.com 



WESTWOOD ADJACENT $1300 Condo 2- 
bdrm/2-bath. Balcony, appliances, pool, 
quiet kx:ked building/garage 310-553-6662. 

WESTWOOD WALK To UCLA. Luxury 
2tKlmV2ba w/bak:ony, gated parking, fire- 
place, fridge and dishwasher, swimming 
pool/spa. Available 03/01/98 $1300/mo 
310-208-2617 

WESTWOOD, 1440 Veteran Studio w/lull 
kitchen, bed, desk .^ecured building&park- 
ing. Utilities paid Pool, spa, laundry, 
rec.room. $795/mo. 818-222-1909 or 310- 
478-7570 

WESTWOOD 1 MIN from UCLA Single 
$750 Gated complex. Pool Laundry All util- 
ities paid. 1 yr lease 310-824-1830 » 

WESTWOOD. 2bdrm/1bth w/oven 
range&dishwasher Gated building, 2-car 
tandem parking Available now. 1675 Man- 
ning. $1000/mo 310-476-6763 



- • PALMS • "5 

2BD, 2BA, 

CUSTOM TOWNHOUSE, FIREPLACE. 

BALCONY, GATED GARAGE, 

ALARM IN UNIT 

• 3614 FARIS $1045 

(310)837-0906 

460. 3BA 

LOFT, CUSTOM TOWNHOME, FIREPLACE, 

GATED GARAGE. ALARM IN UNIT 

• 3640 WESTWOOD BLVD. $1795 

(310)391-1076 

* MAR VISTA * 

460 46A 

GATED GARAGE , ALARM IN UNIT 

t 39S4BMtl)OV«lSL$1795 

280, 2BA, 2-STORY 

CUSTOM TOWNHOUSE. RREPLACE. 

eALCONY GATED GARAGE. 

ALARM IN UNIT 

• 11748 Courtleign Dr.$925 • 

, (310)391-1076 , 

■■ Open HouK Mon Sat . 1 5 ■■ 



CasaBlanca West 

Large Furnished 
& Unfurnished 

1 Bedroom S895 - S945 






cioseti tour Security I 

530 Veteran 
208-4394 



WESTWOOD. Extra large 1-bdrm apart- 
ment. Upper-unit, quiet building, hardwood 
floors. New appliances, parking, 
washer/dryer Walking distance to UCLA. 
$1,100/n)o 310-208-2606 

WESTWOOD WALK To UCLA Luxury 
2bdrm/2ba w/balcony, gated parking, lire 
place, fridge and dishwasher, swimnimg 
pooL'spa Available 03/01 98 $1300/nio 
310 208-2617 

WLA. $775/month Large 1-bdrm/1-bath 
Pool. Built in stove and oven. Telephone en- 
try. Large closets Quiet, private 1831 Fed- 
eral Ave 310-478-7150 




MAH vi..>IA Sb^'t), inoim. Ask ,iu..nj! iiee 
rent. Attractive, furnished 1-bdrm. Large, 
pool, patio, bartsecue area. Quiet-building. 
3748 Inglewood Blvd 310-398-8579 

WLA-$590/mo Ask about free rent. Attrac- 
tive furnished-singles. Near UCLA/VA. Ideal 
for students. Suitable for two Definite must 
seel 1525 Sawipllo Bi '^in-477-4ft'H? 




NEXT TO KAHAMuuNI SIUUIOS- Victor- 
ian townhouse 2bdrm/1bath, upper w/ga- 
rage. Full kitchen Washer/dryer Brand new 
carpet. Month to Month. $400-t-half utilities. 
Next to gym 213-465-8614. 

WLA. $950 TOWNHSE/APT 2bdrm/1 5ba 
2 parkings. AC, dishwasher, fireplace, stove, 
fridge 1826 Bundy Dr 310-450-8414 



WES; ljALl Near sttiools, shopping, 1844 
square feet. 3-bdrm/2-bath, den, new car- 
pet/hardwood floors 2-fireplaces By owner 
$360,000 310-206-8028/473-8191 




FORMER UCLA TENNIS PLAYER seeks 
guesthouse with court WHf pay rent and or 
exchange lessons Have references. 310- 
585-6073 

GRAD STUDENT WHO COMMUTES from 
Bay Area seeks quiet room M-W evenings 
only Contact Robert at rdees@ucla edu or 
650-813-0507 



O'Melveny & Myers ^ 
Law Firm 

Needs Summer Sublets 

If you are interested in 

subletting your furnished ^ 

apartment any time from May \\ 

to August, our law students 

will be needing housing. 

Please call the Recruiting 

Office at 

(213)669-6079 



nMM iOf' ln|p 



BbVtHLr Hii_Lb Free roomAboard in beau- 
tiful BH home in exchange for light cook- 
ing&babysitting. Must have expenence 
w/kids, car required. Call Elizabeth 310-205- 
0072 



FREE RM&BOARD 

(OWN BA/PHONE) in exchange for 20hrs wk 
in beautiful WLA hm. Duties include hse 
cleaning, laundry&babysitting 310-837- 
8807 

ROOM/BOARD&SMALL 
SALARY 

Busy executive in Glendale needs help 
w/househokf duties, lite cooking, cleaning, 
shopping Occasional help w/2 young child- 
ren Quality individuals ONLY Good driving 
record&references a must' 818-249-6105 or 
818-241-7383 ask for Peter Blacksberg 




BEVERLY HILLS, furnished pnvate rooms in 
large house w/grad students, kitchen privi- 
leges, pool, washer/dryer, utilities/included 
Need car, $475/$575 (huge separate rear 
room) Leave message Abbey 310-275- 
383 lor 818-783-5151 

BEVERLYWOOD Huge, nicely furnished 
room Male, N/S private entrance, bath- 
room, refrigerator/mcrowave, parking. 24- 
hour patrolled neighborhood lOmin drive to 
campus. 310-838-4443 

BRENTWOOD. Share 2-bdmV2-bath Pri- 
vate room arKl bath Near shops Fireplace, 
patio. Charming Female N/S, No pet 
$50a'nrK) 310-476-2105 



Bruins turn to the Daily Bruin first for fioiising. 



CULVER CITY-Rm in 3bdrm duplex. Cool 
rmmates, lots of space, plenty of parking. 
April-June. $420/mo. 310-558-1129 

GREAT PLACE 

WESTWOOD 1 or 2 people to share large 
apartment 2bdrm/2-bath 2-story Free 
parking, full kitchen, large bak:ony with view 
$595/nfK). Avail starting April 1st. Just south 
of Wilshire (Veteran+Ohio). Please call Nick 
310-479-0789 

HOLLYWOOD HILLS. Quiet room, private 
entrance. Secluded hillside home near Cold- 
watef/MuHho)larKj.^=ndge, mrcrqwave, cable, 
carport, patio, pool. $475-includes utilities. 
213-654-6968 

LA ROOM w/ shared bath 20 min to UCLA 
1 busline. $375 utilities included Kay©213- 
851-6130 

LAURA LADERA. Adj to Westchester. In- 
cludes kitchen/laundry privileges. Prefer fe- 
male graduate student. Share house w/li- 
brarian. $425/mo. 310-410-4179. 

PALMS. Your own room. Share an apartment 
near bus/freeway Chopping. Patio, utilities 
included. $250/mo. 310-838-7656. 

SM PRIVATE ENTRANCE $525/$575 1- 
bdrm/1-bath in 2-bdrm/2-bath Furnished, 
utilities paid, cable, pool/gym, laundry Se- 
cured building. N/S. No parking. FEMALE- 
PREFERRED. 310-453-7649 

WLA Your own room Share house near 
bus, shopping, freeway Share utility, laun- 
dry $445. 310-397-5251 

WEST HOLLYWOOD Room in 3-bed histor- 
ical monument near Melrose&La Cienaga. 
Wood floors, beamed ceiling. $450/mo, in- 
cluding parking&utilities 213-655-6300. 

WESTSIDE' VILLAGE Large bedroom w/ 
bathroom. Pnvate entrance Use of kitchen 
$375, including utilities&cable Parking. 
Available March 15th 310-287-1449. 

WLA, NEAR UCLA. $495/mo Large room, 
5bath Off-street parking Quiet area, good 
for UCLA student Female preferred, N/S. 1- 
800-404-6202 




BRENTWOOD ADJACENT Clean female 
Own bed/bath Spacious 1 -block 
Wilshire/Barnngton bus Laundry, dishwash- 
er, fireplace, sundeck. $425/month+deposit 
310-473-9743 

BRENTWOOD $550/mo Female profes- 
sional seeking fnendly considerate room- 
mate to share 2-bdrnrV2-bath Huge closet, 
on bus line, secunty building, parking 
Jessica-3 10-445-9877 

MARINA DEL REYA/ENICE Roomate need-- 
ed to share 3 bdrm/2bath house 3 blocks 
from Manna pier Yard, garage and hard- 
wood floors S550/mo+utilities Call Jeff 310- 
656-7190 or 31 0-301 -7853(night) 

ROOMMATE/MATES needed, male/female 
to share luxurious 2-tx)rm apartment on Kel- 
ton. Own bedroom, own bathroom. Parking 
space optional Contact 310-209-1607 



SANTA MONICA Fantastic Location Ocean 
view. North of Wilshire, perfect for |og, 
beach. Male roommate $500-^1 /2utilities 
Betty 3 10-394-43 13 

WEST LA. Non-smoking female to rent pn- 
vate 1-bdrm/l-ba in 2+2 nice&spacious 
apartment Please call and leave mes- 
sage 310-253-0848 

WESTWOOD- 1 or 2females lor room in 
huge 2-bdrm/1-bath Hardwood floors, din- 
ing, living Strathmore/Levering 310-208- 
3246 

WESTWOOD- Roomate to share 2+2 w/ 2 
other females Luxury secured condo. 
$400/mo-i-own parking space On major bus 
routes 310-234-9981 

WLA Townhse Own bdrm/ba Balcony Imi 
to UCLA. Parking $600 Anthony 310-470- 
5999. 



WESTWOOD-FEMALE WANTED to share a 
room in a large 3 room apartment Veteran 
and Levering and lot 31. ASAP $420 310- 
824-7902 

WESTWOOD On Veteran&Strathmore 
Female needed to share rm/ba in 3t)drm apt 
$4(X)/mo negotiable Undergrnd parking. 
Start spring qtr. 310-824-4933 




CULVER CITY- Room in 3bdrm duplex Cool 
roommates, lots of space, plenty of parking 
April-June $420/nrK) 310-558-1129 




ROSARITO BEACH, 1-2-or-3bdrm con- 
dos*new 3-bdrm on beach Pools, tennis, 
dance, horses 24-hr market Security 909- 
737-9203 



Displa, 
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.•f 



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Snowboarding: What the newest 
medal sport is all about. S«« page 3 

Khs off the Sdiwimmer man: Meet the 
cast of' Kissing a Fool" See page 23 

The Devils: Find out how UCLA 
fared against Duke. See back page 




4 * » 4 4 • » I ^ t V ^ 1 » t 
t i' I I I I J-^ « ' « I'll > ^ *. *■ 



V I E W'P 

The chancellor 
speaks 



o I N T 




UCLA's Mir talks 
about the aW!?6rsity 
and where It's headed 
See page "MM 




79th year Circulation 20,000 



Monday, February 23, 1998 



www.dailybruin.uda.edu 



Dixon says UCUV discriminated 



LAWSUIT: Former Family 
Medicine resident intern claims 
that he received undo criticism 



By Kathryn Combs 

Daily Bruin Staff 

David Dixon, a former medical resident at 
UCLA, was dismissed from the Department of 
Family Medicine's intern program two months 
before receiving his license to practice medicine 

In response. Dixon filed suit Jan. 6 claiming 
he was discriminated against by UCLA and the 
Department of Family Medicine and was termi- 
nated under false pretenses. Dixon is asking for 
$10 million upon the resolution of this case. * 

Released from the program on March .^I. 
1994, Dixon filed an administrative complaint 
on Aug. 31, 1995. Administrative hearings con- 
tinued through May 1997. However, according 
to Melanie Lomax, legal counsel for Dixon, the 
hearings resulted in a stalemate. 

"The university stood fast with their deci- 
sion," Lomax said. 

"(Dixon) lost confidence that he would be 
"TetnstaredTbrough the internaf appeal process^ 
he decided to take his case to court," Lomax 
said. * 

Legal counsel for UCLA refused to give com- 
ment at this time. 

The university did not comment regarding 
why Dixon was released from the program. 

However, according to Dixon, the university 
alleged he was not fulfilling his responsibilities. 



"I never had one patient complaint or wrote 
one wrong order or hurt anyone," Dixon said. 

"He was consistently accused of subjective 
things, like he was too slow and did not have an 
adequate knowledge base. It is his position that, 
as the first black male in that department, he was 
subject to different standards," Lomax said. 

"It is our contention that they blew everything 
out of proportion," Lomax said. 

"One obstacle after another was placed in his 
way to prevent him from getting his license," she 
added. 

Admitted to the UCLA Department of 
Family Medicine as a resident in 1993, Dixon 
learned that he was the only African American 
resident in the department in the last 17 years. 

"It is an extra racially hostile atmosphere in 
the department of family medicine," Lomax 
said. "Their admission that there has not been a 
female or male African American doctor in the 
department is a clear indication of institutional 
racism." 

However, Dr. Alan Robinson, associate 
senior dean of the School of Medicine, said the 
medical school prides itself on its racially 
diverse atmosphere. 

"We do not discriminate based onj;ace, andj^ 
am very proud of our years of trying to recog- 
nize that the physician who comes from a minor- 
ity background has a high likelihood of going 
back to serve minority patients," Robinson said. 

"Oyer the past 18 years, 12 times a UCLA 
medical student has been recognized as the top 
minority medical student by the Association of 
American Medical Colleges," he added. 

"There is not anybody that can approach that 



record," he said. 

Dixon, 37, grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where 
he attended mostly-white elementary and high 
schools. Dixon received his undergraduate 
degree in biology in 1983 from Fisk University in 
Nashville, Tennessee, a traditionally African- 
American college, and his graduate degree from 
the Medical College of Ohio at Toledo in 1993. 

See DIXON, page 16 




Coottesy al Ihe l*w Offices o( M*lan* Lorrui 



David Dixon, former Department of Family 
Medicine resident is suing UCLA. 



Law students face judgment day at Moot Court 



COMPEimON: Aspiring 
lawyers present briefs, 
practice speaking skills 



By Emi Kojima 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

The courtroom was cold. Three 
black-robed judges sat in a row at 
the bench with the U.S. Hag to their 
right and the California state Hag to 
their left. 

They scrutinized the lawyer who 
stood in front of them. 

"Why was that ?" the judge in the 
middle interrupted the lawyer in 
mid-speech. 

She began to respond, but the 
judge interrupted her again, "Why 
was that?" 

This grilling of UCLA law stu- 
dents by formidable judges was part 
of Saturday's honors Moot Court 
competition held by students of the 
UCLA Law School. 

Students participated in the 
three-round competition in a simu- 
lated appellate courtroom. Winners 
will be announced in about two 
weeks. 

After this first round, the two 
teams gave sighs of relief. 

"It's hard to know how you did." 
said Fred Wilks. a second-year law 
student. "You get nervous." 

"Your mouth goes dry," said his 
partner. Russell Wetanson. also a 
second-year law student. 

"And it's cold," opponent 




CHANLf S KUO/Oaity Brum 

(Left to right) Mkhael Brown, Karen Stephenson and Claudia Rivera, all second-year UCLA law stu- 
dents, participate in the Moot Court competition. 



Azadeh Allayce said. • . ' 

They competed for their 
resumes, for experience and for fun. 
"It's a way to distinguish yourself 
as a law-school student," said Brian 
Barnes, a second-year law student. 

These students are among the 
approximately 6S advocates who 
argued in Saturday's competition, 



after advancing from the fall com- 
petition of about 120 people. 

The Moot Court board had to 
round up about 70 judges to evalu- 
ate their briefs and oral advocacy 
skills. Judgts evaluate students on 
their speaking skills and prepared 
briefs on a fictional case. 

"It's remarkable, sometimes. 



because they are better than real 
lawyers," said Marc Hankin. a 
patent attorney who judged the 
competition. 

**Law students focus on the 
issues and are most highly interest- 
ed in the material," he said. 

Sec COMP 11 ITION, page 1 5 



Bill would 
force UCs to 
fund benefits 
for partners 

LEGISLATION: Knight's 
proposal sets back, but 
would not end, program 



By Brian Fishman 

Daily Bruin Contributor . • 

UC domestic partnership benefits 
may be destroyed shortly after get- 
ting off the ground. 

A measure in the state senate, 
authored by Sen. William Knight, R- 
Palmdale. would not eliminate 
domestic partnership benefits, but 
would end state funding for them. 

"The bill would not prevent these 
disbursements, but the university 
would have to raise their own 
money," said Andy Putno, a 
spokesman for Knight. 



The proposed act t'equires that 
UCs find funding themselves. 
Perhaps by "raising tuition." Putno 
said. 

Domestic partners are scheduled 
to receive benefits next fall. Such dis- 
bursements would cost the UCs $20 
million per year, he $aid. 

But. gay rights activists are fearful 
this bill's effects may reach far 
beyond the UC system. 

"The most important thing this bill 
does is provide a chilling effect for all 
institutions providing domestic part- 
nership benefits," said Ronnie Sanlo, 
director of the Lesbian, Gay, 
Bisexual and Transgender Campus 
Resource Center. 

Knight claims that bill SB 1484 is 
needed to ensure the UC Regents do 
not usurp the public's authority. He 
claims the general public does not 
support domestic partnership dis- 
bursements. 

"The legislature has declined to 
provide taxpayer dollars for these 
types of programs. The Regents are 
backdooring a policy the Senate 
would not enact," said Putno. 

But, the reason Knight authored 
this bill is not in response to public 
outcry, said Ronnie Sanlo, Director 
of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and 
Transgender Campus Resource 
Center (LGBT). 

"If they didn't have homosexual 
issues, they'd have a hard time 
fundraising," Sanlo said. 

The bill's chances of becoming law 
are unclear. There is opposition to 
the bill even in the senate education 
committee. ' , 

Tom Hayden, D-Los Angeles, an 
education committee member, will 
surely fight the bill, said Stephanie 
Reubin, a Hayden spokesman. 

Yet, Knight does have supporters 
in Sacramento. His aides claimed 
that the bill is in line with Governor 
Wilson's policy. 

UCSF Labor leader Karen 
MacLeod denounced the policy, but 
agreed that Wilson will support the 
bill. 

"I would drop dead if he doesn't 

Sec DOmsnC pa9c17 



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i i 



• ♦♦ * 



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•♦# 



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Rugs/ Throws 
$Q99 



^Si- 



Greeting Cards 

50% Off 



m^m ^mvo^iif 



Gift Wrap 

Rolls & Tissues 

Buy One Get One 

Free —^ 



«•y><•■•rA■•>^OAft>r.:^. 



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J P 



Valentine Teddy Bears 

75% Off 



Display: 
$2499 

Reg: *34'' 



of equal or lesser value 



T-Shirts 

50% Off 






Except South Park 



EVERYTHING 

MUST GO!!! 

FINAL DATE 

2/28 



Winnie the Pooh 

Clothing: 50% OFF 
Ceramics: 40% OFF 
Goods: 40% OFF 



Glow in the 
Dark STARS 

**30%0ff 

* * - 



Selected T-Shirts 

4for»10«' 



Novelty Gifts 

20% to 70% Off 



i^f 



EVERYTHING 20% to 70% OFF 



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SECOND EXPOSURE 



► I nsido today 

Snowboarding: What the newest 
medal sport is all about. See page 3 

Kiss of ttie Schwimmer man: Meet the 
cast of Kissing a Fool" See page 23 

The Devils: Find out how UCLA 
fared against Duke. See bacit page 




V I E W P O 

The chancellor 
speaks 



I N T 



eff 



UCLA's teller talks 
about the JFOvTersity '^ 
and where It's headed. 
See page ^fit 




79th year Circulation 20,000 



Monday, February 23, 1998 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



Dixon says UCLAdjscrirninated 



LAWSUIT: Former Family 
Medicine resident intern claims 
that he received undo criticism 



By Kathryn ComlK 

Daily Bruin Staff 

David Dixon, a former medical resident at 
UCLA, was dismissed from the Department of 
Family Medicine's intern program two months 
before receiving his license to practice medicine. 

In response. Dixon filed suit Jan. 6 claiming 
he was discriminated against by UCLA and the 
Department of Family Medicine and was termi- 
nated under false pretenses Dixon is asking for 
$10 million upon the resolution of this case. 

Released from the program on March 31. 
1994, Dixon filed an administrative complaint 
on Aug. 31. 1995. Administrative hearings con- 
tinued through May 1997. However, according 
to Melanie Lomax. legal counsel for Dixon, the 
hearings resulted in a stalemate. 

"The university stood fast with their deci- 
sion." Lomax said. 

"(Dixon) lost confidence thai he would be 
reinstated through the internal appeal process so^ 
he decided to take his case to court." Lomax 
said. 

Legal counsel for UCLA refused to give com- 
ment at this time. 

The university did not comment regarding 
why Dixon was released from the program. 

However, according to Dixon, the university 
alleged he was not fulfilling his responsibilities. 



"I never had one patient complaint or wrote 
one wrong order or hurt anyone." Dixon said. 

"He was consistently accused of subjective 
things, like he was too slow and did not have an 
adequate knowledge base. It is his position that, 
as the first black male in that department, he was 
subject to different standards," Lomax said. 

"It is our contention that they blew everything 
out of proportion," Lomax said. 

"One obstacle after another was placed in his 
way to prevent him from getting his license." she 
added. 

Admitted to the UCLA Department of 
Family Medicine as a resident in 1993. Dixon 
learned that he was the only African American 
resident in the department in the last 17 years. 

"It is an extra raciailyhostile atmosphere in 
the department of family medicine." Lomax 
said. "Their admission that there has not been a 
female or male .MVican American doctor in the 
department is a clear indication of institutional 
racism." 

However. Dr. Alan Robinson, associate 
senior dean of the School of Medicine, .said the 
medical school prides itself on its racially 
diverse atmosphere. 

"We do not discriminate based on race, and I 
am very proud of our years of trying to recog- 
nize that the physician who comes from a minor- 
ity background has a high likelihood of going 
back to serve minority patients," Robinson said. 

"Over the past 18 years. 12 times a UCLA 
medical student has been recognized as the top 
minority medical student Jjy the Association of 
American Medical Colleges." he added. 

"There is not anybody that can approach that 



record," he said. 

Dixon, 37, grew up in Tucson. Arizona, where 
he attended mostly-white elementary and high 
schools. Dixon received his undergraduate 
degree in biology in 1983 from Fisk University in 
Nashville. Tennessee, a traditionally African- 
American college, and his graduate degree from 
the Medical College of Ohio at Toledo in 1993 

SeeDIX0N,page16 




Couriesyoflt , 



David Dixon, former Department of Family 
Medicine resident, is suing UCLA. 



Law students face judgment day at Moot Court 



COMPETrnON: Aspiring 
lawyers present briefs, 
practice speaking skills 



By Emi Kojima 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

The courtroom was cold. Three 
black-robed judges sat in a row at 
the bench with the U.S. fiag to their 
right and the California state Hag to 
their left. 

They scrutinized the lawyer who 
stood in front of them. 

"Why was that ?" thejudge in the 
middle interrupted the lawyer in 
mid-speech. 

She began to respond, but the 
judge interrupted her again, "Why 
was that?" 

This grilling of UCLA law stu- 
dents by formidable judges was part 
of Saturday's honors Moot Court 
competition held by students of the 
UCLA Law School. 

Students participated in the 
three-round competition in a simu- 
lated appellate courtroom. Winners 
will be announced in about two 
weeks. 

After this first round, the two 
teams gave sighs of relief. 

"It's hard to know how you did," 
said Fred Wilks, a second-year law 
"Student. "You get nervous." 

"Your mouth goes dry," said his 
partner, Russell Wetanson, also a 
second-year law student. . 

"And it's cold," opponent 




tHARUSKUO.'DailyBiuin 

(Left to right) Michael Brown, Karen Stephenson and Claudia Rivera, all second-year UCLA law stu- 
dents, participate in the Moot Court competition. 



Azadeh Allayce said. 

They competed for their 
resumes, for experience and for fun. 

"It's a way to distinguish yourself 
as a law-school student," said Brian 
Barnes, a second-year law student. 

These students are among the 
approximately 65 advocates who 
argued in Saturday's competition, 



after advancing from the fall com- 
petition of about 120 people. 

The Moot Court board had to 
round up about 70 judges to evalu- 
ate their briefs and oral advocacy 
skills. Judges evaluate students on 
their speaking skills and prepared 
briefs on a fictional case. > ' 

"It's remarkable, somctiiries, 



because they are better than real 
lawyers," said Marc Hankin. a 
patent attorney who judged the 
competition. 

"Law students focus on the 
issjies and are most highly interest- 
ed in the material," he said. 

"~ V. See COMPETITION, pag« IS 



Bill would 
force UCs to 
fund benefits 
for partners 

LEGISLATION: Knight's 
proposal sets back, but 
would not end, program 



By Brian Fishman 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

UC domestic partnership benefits 
may be destroyed shortly after get- 
ting off the ground. 

A measure in the state senate, 
authored by Sen. William Knight, R- 
Palmdale. would not eliminate 
domestic partnership benefits, but 
would end state funding for them. 

"The bill would not prevent these 
disbursements, but the university 
would have to raise their own 
money," said Andy Putno, a 
spokesman for Knight. 

The proposed act requires that^ 
UCs find funding themselves. 
Perhaps by "raising tuition," Putno 
said. 

Domestic partners are scheduled 
to receive benefits next fall. Such dis- 
bursements would cost the UCs S20 
million per year, he said. 

But, gay rights activists are fearful 
this bill's effects may reach far 
beyond the UC system. 

"The most ijjsportant thing this bill 
does is provide a chilling effect for all 
institutions providing domestic part- 
nership benefits," said Ronnie Sanlo, 
director of the Lesbian, Gay._ 
Bisexual and Transgender Campus 
Resource Center. 

Knight claims that bill SB 1484 is 
needed to ensure the UC Regents do 
not usurp the public's authority. He 
claims the general public does not 
support domestic partnership dis- 
bursements. 

"The legislature has declined to 
provide taxpayer dollars for these 
types of programs. The Regents "are 
backdooring a policy the Senate 
would not enact," said Putno 

But, the reason Knight authored 
this bill IS not in response to public 
outcry, said Ronnie Sanlo. Director 
of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and 
Transgender Campus Resource 
Center (LGBT). 

"If they didn't have homosexual 
issues, they'd have a hard time 
fundraising," Sanlo said. 

The bill's chances of becoming law 
are unclear. There is opposition to 
the bill even in the senate education 
committee. 

Tom Klayden, D-Los Angeles, an 
education committee member, will 
surely fight the bill, said Stephanie 
Reubin, a Hayden spokesman. 

Yet. Knight does have supporters 
in Sacramento. His aides claimed 
that the bill is in line with Governor 
Wilson's policy. 

UCSF Labor leader Karen 
MacLeod denounced the policy, but 
agreed that Wilson will support the 
bill. 

"I would drop dead if he doesn't 



See DOMESTIC page 17 



2 Monday, February 23, 1998 



Dily Bruin Newt 



Daily Bruin News 



1 : 



Monday, February 23, 1998 3 



COMMUNITY BMEFS 



^•^■ 



AIDS team to study 
immune system 

UCLA researchers will test a dormant part 
of the human body to see if they can regenerate 
an immune system in patients with AIDS. 

Jerome Zack, associate director of the 
UCLA AIDS Institute, and Beth Jamieson will 
work with a $75,000 grant won by Zack from 
the American Foundation for AIDS Research. 
They will investigate if the thymus, which 
grows dormant after the age of 18, can repro- 
duce T-lymphocyte cells, immune cells that 
combat viruses. 

The researchers will transplant adult human 
thymus tissue into mice without immune sys- 
tems and test whether the thymus grows active 
and produces T-cells. If successful, Zack and 
Jamieson will investigate whether the thymus 
can continue to function in the presence of 
HIV. ^ 

Last fall, these researchers made a similar 
discovery, finding that an HIV-infected 
immune system can regenerate itself with 




antiviral drug therapy. 

"Our early research gave us hope 
that HIV directly affects the T-cells, 
Zack said. "Now we must determine if the 
adult thymus has potential to regenerate a new 
immune system." - .. • 

USAC will hold student 
issues forum 

USAC is sponsoring a town hall-style meet- 
ing Tuesday, where students can speak with 
UCLA representatives about issues ranging 
from campus construction to transportation to 
the Instructional Enhancement Initiative. 

Present at the forum will be Charles Oakley, 
head of capital programs and campus archi- 
tect; John Sandbrook, assistant provost of the 
College of Letters and Science; Renee Fortier, 
associate director of Transportation Services; 
and, tentatively scheduled to appear, Michael 
Foraker, director of housing administration. 

The forum will be held Tuesday, from noon 
to 1:30 p.m. in the Ackerman second floor 



lounge, next to the grand bail- 
room. 



UCSF faculty ; 
students recognized 

Four people at UC San Francisco recently 
were awarded the Martin Luther King Jr. 
Award for promoting diversity and ideals 
inspired by the civil rights leader. 

Daniel Lowenstein, M.D.. one of the recipi- 
ents, served as co-chair of the Chancellor's 
Steering Committee on Diversity from 1995 to 
1997. 

In that position, Lowenstein helped develop 
programs addressing campus diversity and 
affirmative action. He also obtained funding 
for committee activities. 

Stella Hsu, who served with Lowenstein on 
the steering committee, played a role in estab- 
lishing programs that promote mutual respect, 
understanding and appreciation for cultural 
diversity at the campus. 

Kyra Bobinet and Jennifer Danek, fourth- 



year medical students, received the award for 
the program of instruction they devised to help 
at-risk youth at a San Francisco youth guidance 
center. 

Getty awards grant to 
Fowler Museum 

The UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural 
History was just given a $130,000 grant from 
the Getty Grant Program. The grant money 
will help fund publications about non-Western 
textile studies. 

"Among the world's art forms, clothing tra- 
ditions are one of those most intimately tied to 
fundamental issues of identity," Doran H. 
Ross, the Fowler Museum's director, said. 

The Fowler Museum already publishes high- 
ly regarded scholarship on non-Western textile 
studies. Its own collective includes more than 
10,000 items related to textiles which span two 
millennia and five continents. 

Compiled from Bruin staff and wire reports. 




ChickervslickBugFEce b^jknvMtak 



/-(wm! i.oooMlLe rAi6wru>A/ 

r^^MO^i^ HeU(5« T6RMIM, 
I fO(l\AJHAT?Afev^ ^1^ 



'/ 



// 



LESS THAN ONE WEEK LEFT: 

Until UCLA billir>g statements 
are mailed. 

To file financial aid applica- 
tions for 1998-1999. 

For students whio are continu- 
ing to file applications for under- 
graduate scholarships for 1998 - 
1999. 

DONT FORGET: 

Need to talk? We're here to 
listen. UCLA Peer Helpline. 825- 
HELP. 

Need an escort? Call 794- 
WALK. 



WHAT'S BRE WIN' TODAY 



Monday 

UCLA Orientation Program 
Orientation Assistant positions 

available . 

Come pick up an application! 
Applications due Feb. 27 
201 Corel Commons 

8 a.m. 

Save the Dream 

March and rally to fight the anti- 
labor initiative, jobs, education 
and access for our seniors, our 
youth and our future. 
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum 
794-0383 



Noon 

University Catholic Center 
Catholic Mass (12: 10) ., 
Kerckhon"400 



2 p.m. 

Baha'i Unity Club 
Meeting 
Ackerman 2412 



■j^-* 



Ralph starts to awaken to the fact that his life is 
being run by sex. 



<r 



»'^- 



CORRECTIONS 



Friday's news article, "Boelter 
chemical spill produces desired reac- 
tion," incorrectly identified the 
building where the chemical spill 
took place. The building was 
Engineering IV. The Bruin regrets 
the error. 



5 p.m. 

Environmental Coalition 
General meeting to discuss 
recycling on campus and other 
environmental issues. 
Kerckhofr301 -2064438 

UCLA Education Society 
General meeting 
Moore Hall 3034 

UCLA Education Society 
General meeting 
Call Nancy Karmelich 
Moore Hall 3034 • 374-6872 

6 p.m. 

American Indian Student 

Association 

General meeting/social at 

Acapuico 

3201 Campbell Hall -206-7513 

ALD/PES Honor Societies 

Meeting 

Kinsey 364 • 267-8166 

Catholic Students Association 
Presentation on Vatican Angels 
Display 
840HilgardAve. 



7 p.m. 

Bruin Leaders Project 
Communication and Leadership 
West Coast Room 
Covel Commons • 206-5071 

Bruin Leaders Project 
Personality Styles and Leadership 
203 Covel Commons • 206-5071 

Tuesday Noon 

USAC Internal Vice President 
Student Issues Forum 
Chance to ask questions 
regarding campus issues 
Ackerman 2nd Floor Lounge 

Bruin Victory Fellowship 
"Limit X" Hip-hop/reggae/pop 
group from Uganda, Africa 
Westwood Plaza 

5 p.m. 

National Society of Collegiate 
Scholars 

Informational meeting 
JaneSayegh -^ 

Career Center 



6 p.m. 

Cirde K 
General meeting 
Haines 6 



J 



Bruin Leaders Project 
Diversity and Leadership (6:30) 
1270 Public Policy -206-5071 

Bruin Victory Fellowship 
Racial reconciliation 
racism - Darryl Flowers (6:30) 
UCLA Tennis Center 

7 p.m. 

Office of Residential Life 
United We Stand 
Readings from AIDS Project-Los 
Angeles Writers' Workshop 
and Candlelight Vigil in honor of 
people who have been 
affected by AIDS/HIV 
Sproul Hall Turnaround 
206-8193 

Bruin Leaders Project 

Navigating Leadership 

203 Covel Commons - 206-5071 

What's Brewin' can t)e reached via e-mail 
at whatsbrewin#media.ucla.edu 



^-*SrK- 



I ' IIPWIM^ ^ ^ 

Too cool 



Since its debut at the Winter Olympics in 
Nagano, the snowboarding craze ; 
continues to attract many enthusiasts 
who prefer its simplicity over skiing 



't^>. .A-A.- •«. 



The Dally Bruin (ISSN KMO-SOM) is published and copyrighted by the ASUCLA Commonic«ions Board All rights are reserved. Reprinting of any material in this publKation without the wrinen permission o» the Communications Board is strictly prohibited The 
ASUCLA Communications Board fully supports the University of California's policy on non-dltcrimination The student media reserve the right to reject or modify advertising whose content diKriminates on the basis of ancestry, color, national origin, race, religion 
disability, age, sex or sexual orientation. The ASUCLA Communications Board has a media grievance procedure for resoKrirtg complaints against any of its pubDcations. For a copy dl the complete procedure, contact the publications ofUce at 1 1 8 Kerckhoff Hall All 
inserts that are printed in the Dally Bruin are indeper>dently paid publications and do not reflect the views of the Editorial Board or the staff 

0«ay tnitm, 1 1> KectfchoW Htit, 30« MH t tmwi PU»«. Let Awflea. CA »0024, H10| %iS ft%, hWr7/www.a«<lybTM>n.ucto.edM. fa» (»10) 2<»-0»<» 



By Meghan WanI 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

If you have never heard of carving, nose 
' slides, tail grabs and 540s, then you have not 
yet joined the latest craze in snowtime enter- 
tainment. Debuting this year in the Winter 
Olympics in Nagano, snowboarding is the 
fastest growing winter sport in the world. 

What's the big fuss? Why are kids of all ages 
rushing out to buy snowboards instead of 
alpine skis? Maybe it is because brand name 
companies like Levi's. Mountain Dew and 
American Express have used snowboarding 
as a marketing tool to reach Generation X and 
Generation Next. 

Neil Ishibashi, captain of the UCLA snow- 
boarding team and snowboarding club", thinks 
that younger kids see snowboarding as an 
extreme sport. 

"When I was a kid, I was into Star Wars. 
Their idea of cool is the Mountain Dew image. 
Freestyle is more for the aggressive type of 
person. You have to lake risks." 

Freeriding is snowboarding down a hill, 
carving big turns. Freestyle is making use of 
the snowboard park and the half-pipe. The 
snowboard park is equipped with jumps, 
spines and rail slides. The half-pipe is a long, 
narrow run with steep sides similar to those in 
in a skateboard park and attracts advanced 
riders who prefer to spend more time in the air 
than on the mountain. 

Snowboarding began in the 1960s when an 
inventor named Sherman Poppen got the idea 
from watching his daughter Wendy ride down 
the neighborhood hill standing on her sled. He 
tied a rope onto the tip of a board and called it 
a Snurfer (snow surfer). 

Over the next decade, Poppen sold over 1 
million Snurfers in toy stores throughout the 
country. 

In the early 1970s, Dimitrije Milovitch was 
the first to incorporate metal edges into the 
snowboard. His Winterstick became famous 
. in the first snowboarding video. "ApcKalypse 
Now." Soon after. Jake Burton, a surfer and 
skier from Long Island and Tom Sims, a skate- 
boarder from New Jersey, developed th«r 



own versions of the snowboard. 

Until the mid-1980s, most ski resorts con- 
sidered snowboarding to be a dangerous 
threat to skiers, limiting access or denying it 
altogether, forcing snowboarders to head for 
the back country where they would have to 
snowshoe up the mountain in order to prac- 
tice. 

Mountain High claims it was the first resort 
in Southern California to offer snowboarding. 
Alpine Meadows, in Lake Tahoe, is allowing 
access to snowboarders this winter for the first 
time, with a brand new snowboarding park 
and half-pipe. 

Between the giant slalom, the bordercross 
and the half-pipe, the challenges are endless. 
Ishibashi explains that in the bordercross, four 
to six racers go down a hill full of jumps, 
beams and gates, and the first two down 
advance to the next heat until one winner 
remains. 

In UCLA's most recent competition as 
part of the Southern California College Ski 
and Snowboard Conference, competing 
against schools like UCSB. Cal Poly and USC, 
Ishibashi won first place, and Mike Rockwell, 
the team's president, took second. 

Overall points are calculated for each 
event, including the bordercross and the giant 
slalom. To date, the UCLA men's snowboard- 
ing team has taken first place in every compe- 
tition. 

Rockwell explains that snowboarding has a 
much higher learning curve than skiing. "If 
you surf, that'll help you to pick it up really 
fast." 

Cory Stein, fourth-year sociology student 
and member of the UCLA women's snow- 
boarding team, agrees. 

"If you can get through the first three times, 
you'll really enjoy it. Your first time you're 
going to be on your butt, but once you get it, 
it's so much fun." 

Stein skied for several years as a child, but 
never really enjoyed it. Five years ago, she 
tried snowboarding. and now she ndes at least 
once a week at Snow Summit and Mammoth 

See SNOWBOARDING, page 10 




magn 



f _ 

Course websites, virtual office hours concern faculty 



Arts & Entertainment; 825-2538. News: 825-2795; SDorts;825-9851; Viewpomt;825-2216; Chssified Line; 825-2221; Chssified Display; 206-3060; S<iles;825-21()1 



SPEAKER: Relationships 
between instructors, 
students may suffer 



By Chauntdlc Tibbals 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

On Friday Assemblywoman 
Sheila Kuehl fielded questions 
from concerned faculty about 
technology affecting their jobs. 

Kuehl and faculty conferred 
about two major issues: the owner- 
ship of online course material and 
student-faculty relations. 

Because UCLA strongly sug- 
gests that faculty maintain a web 
"Site for their classes, some believe 
that is a requirement, according to 
Katherine King, UCLA associate 
professor of comparative litera- 
ture. 



"The misconception around 
campus is that it is required, when 
it isa t," King said. 

Since fall quarter, UCLA has 
been charging students an instruc- 
tional enhancement fee to main- 
tain web sites. 

The university assumes owner- 
ship of any text posted on a web- 
site unless it it is formally contest- 
ed, according to a faculty member 
present at the hour-long query. 

"We have to anticipate the fact 
that UCLA assumes they own our 
work," said Nancy Henley, profes- 
sor emeritus of psychology. 

Kuehl, from the 41st Assembly 
District, said she planned to take 
their concerns back to 
Sacramento. 

Faculty members also 
expressed concern about the dete- 
rioration of relations with students 
because of virtual office hours. 



"UCLA assumes they 
own our work." 

Nancy Henley 

Professor emeritus of 
psychology 



Kuehl responded by pointing 
out that online interaction offers 
both faculty and students more 
fiexible contact times. 

Faculty members will "not be 
interrupted by a knock at the door 
at inopportune times," Kuehl 
said. 

Although online student advis- 
ing is not a substitute for faculty- 
student interaction, Kuehl 
acknowledges the usefulness of 
virtual office hours. 




PlMWCKlAM 

Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl speaks about legislative involvement in 
technology arid higher education. 



■i|ijj|j^ii^|iijlti^»i«ifc#l>J«aiiA 



Monday, Mxuary 23, 1998 



After anthrax scar^ FBI 
raids home of researcher 



SEARCH: Investigation 
fails to yield evidence 
to implicate Leavitt 



By Dara Aldko Tom 

The Associated Press * 

LOGANDALE, Nev. - FBI 
agents searched the home of a 
researcher again Sunday, even 
though the man was released 
from jail after tests showed he 
possessed a harmless animal vac- 
cine, not a biological weapon. 



"(The FBI is) looking 
for anything they can 
find to bring charges." 

Lamond Mills 

Lawyer 



More than a dozen agents 
descended on William Leavitt 
Jr.'s property in this small farm- 
ing community 50 miles north- 
east of Las Vegas. Neighbors 
said the agents had been search- 
ing the home and an adjacent 
shed since Wednesday, when 
Leavitt was arrested along with 
Larry Wayne Harris. 

Leavitt's lawyer, Lamond 
Mills, called the search "a fishing 



expedition" and said he planned 
to visit the home to "see what 
kind of shape the house is in and 
what they've taken." 

"I think they're embarrassed, 
and I think they're looking for 
anything they can find to bring 
charges against Bill Leavitt." 
Mills said. 

FBI agents at the scene 
declined to comment. 

The search came on the eve of 
Monday's detention hearing for 
Harris, who remained jailed over 
the weekend on biological 
weapon charges. 

A government lab on Sunday 
was still testing material seized 
from Harris' Ohio home to deter- 
mine if it is a dangerous - and 
illegal - biological agent, federal 
sources have said. Harris is on 
probation for a 1995 conviction 
for illegally obtaining the bubon- 
ic plague bacteria. 

The FBI says its investigation 
of both men is continuing even 
though authorities announced 
Saturday that a substance once 
feared to be the ingredients of a 
biological weapon turned out to 
be a harmless anthrax vaccine. 

The material was seized from 
Leavitt and Harris on 
Wednesday in Henderson, Nev.. 
just outside Las Vegas, triggering 
a nationwide scare. They were 
arrested on charges of possessing 
a biological agent for use as a 

See MnMM](, page 16 



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Daily Bruin News 



Pentagon hesitant in dealings with Saddam 



MIDDLE EAST: Albright 
to reject Iraqi-U.N. deal 
if interests threatened 



ByJimAbrams 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - As the 
Pentagon began the process of calling 
up reserves, Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright said Sunday the 
United States will act alone against 
Iraq if any U.N .-brokered agreement 
with Saddam Hussein jeopardizes 
U.S. interests. 

Administration officials said they 
would be pleased if U.N. Secretary- 
General Kofi Annan returns from 
talks in Iraq with a promise that U.N. 
weapons inspectors can resume their 
work totally free from Iraqi limits or 
harassment. 

But "it is possible that he will come 
with something that we don't like, in 
which case we will pursue our nation- 
al interests," Albright said on ABC's 
"This Week with Sam and Cokie." 

She said Saddam's ability to 
threaten the world with weapons of 
mass destruction must be diminished, 
by military means if necessary. "We 
will pursue that; that's what our job 
is, that's what we will do," she said. 

After Albright and other senior 
American officials made similar 
statements on Sunday's television 
news shows, Annan's spokesman in 
Baghdad, Fred Eckhard, said Annan 
and Saddam had reached agreement 
on opening up presidential palaces to 
inspection, the last main condition 
for avoiding a U.S. military attack. 

White House spokesman Mike 
McCurry said preliminary accounts 
had been received from Baghdad, but 
he declined to assess them. "We've 



got a lot of serious questions. It's a 
very serious matter at a serious time, 
and we want to get some questions 
answered," he said. 

Another senior administration 
official, speaking on condition of 
anonymity, said "we have not got any 
details " from the Annan negotiations 



and that "we'll look at it carefully 
when he gets home." Annan is expect- 
ed to return to New York on Tuesday. 
Clinton spent the afternoon in the 
Oval Office, speaking by phone with 
Sultan Qaboos of Oman and British 

See REACTION, page 10 




TN" Associated Press 



Flanges from a burning Israeli flag reach toward American and British 
flags Sunday during a pro-Iraq demonstration. 



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Uiiii|)iis Events. Wcgi\e voii 13 inches olXXX-Liicnicm. 



Diity Brain News 



Monday, Fetmiafy 23, 1998 



WORLD & NATION 




Dow Jones Industnals 

up; 38.36 
close: 8413.94 



Nasdaq hidci 

up;1.12 
dose: 1728.13 



Yen: 127.90 
Mark: 1.8199 



Campaign reform likely to stall 



CONGRESS: Neither side 
seems able to drum up 
support for legislation 

BytovidEspo 

The Associated Press "~ 

WASHINGTON D.C. - 
Campaign finance legislation 
takes a bow in the Senate this week 
and is likely to be ushered ofT the 
stage almost as quickly as it 
appears. 

"We'll have a few days of 
debate, and it will be clear there 



are not 60 votes for any 
approach," predicted Republican 
Sen. Mitch McConnell of 
Kentucky. 

He's an implacable foe of the 
legislation to ban "soft money" 
and impose other restrictions on 
the campaign spending system. 
But proponents don't disagree 
with that scenario, despite a fresh 
attempt by Maine's moderate 
GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe to 
break a deadlock on the thorny 
issue of union political activity. 

"I will admit that I do not 
believe they (60 votes) are there," 
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said 



at the weekend, conceding that 
supporters of campaign fmance 
legislation won't likely be able to 
break a filibuster. Interviewed on 
CNN's "Evans and Novak," 
McCain said the bill he co- 
authored will garner more support 
than last fall, and "I will view that 
as an accomplishment." 

Majority Leader Trent Lott 
arranged to bring the measure to 
the floor Monday as part of a 
negotiated settlement that ended 
last autumn's campaign finance 
combat. 

~ SeeCMIMiai,pa9e15 



Annan, Hussein pen peace agreement 



IRAQ: Talks don't end 
conflict, but bring hope 
to dangerous situation 



1^ HIBCVt 1^ HCM 

The Associated Press 

BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.N. chief 
Kofi Annan and Iraqi leader 
Saddam Hussein settled the last 
major obstacle^ Sunday to opening 
presidential palaces to U.N. arms 
inspectors, the mam condition for 
avoiding a U.S. attack. Annan's 
spokesman said. 

The agreement camei/luring a 
three-hour meeting between Annan 
and Saddam at the Republican 
Palace, one of eight presidential 
sites that Iraq had declared off-limits 
to U.N. wrapons inspectors, said 
U.N. spokesman Fred Eckhard. 

"We've reached an agreement," 
Eddiard said. "We have a text." 

** We expect the text will be accept- 
able to all 15 members of the 
Security Council." including the 
United States, he said. 

One Iraqi official, who also insist- 
ed his named not be used, was asked 
whether there was a deal. He replied, 
-Yes." 

Annan and Iraq's deputy prime 
minister, Tariq Aziz, met late 
Sunday to agree on the precise word- 
ing of an agreement the secretary- 
general wiO take back to the Security 
Council 

The crisis over weapons inspec- 
tions has brought the Persian Gulf to 
the brink of war. 




The Asyxiaifd Pres% 

U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan (left) watches as Iraq's President 
Saddam Hussein shakes hands with Annan's legal adviser. 



The United States has sent a naval 
armada and 25.000 troops to the 
region to mount air strikes unless 
Iraq agrees to open all sites, includ- 
ing eight presidential palaces, to the 
Xi.H. weapons inspectors. 

Pro-Iraq protests have erupted 
across the Arab world - Jordan had 
to send out tanks in one desert city to 
contain them - and sent Israelis scur- 
rying for gas masks. Diplomats there 
have been preparing to leave. 

Any deal must be endorsed by 
Washington, which has said it would 
refuse an agreement that it believes 
undermines the inspectors' authori- 
ty 

White House spokesman Mike 

McCurry said preliminary accounts 



had been received from Baghdad, 
but he refused to assess them. 
"We've got a lot of serious ques- 
tions. It's a very serious matter at a 
serious time, and we want to get 
some questions answered," he said. 

Britain, America's strongest 
backer for a military strike, also 
reacted cautiously. 

'The expectation is that Kofl 
Annan will make an announcement 
in the morning whether a deal has 
been brokered," a spokesman for 
Prime Minister Tony Blair said on 
customary anonymity. "Even then, 
he will report back to the Security 
Council the details of that." 



See 



14 



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>^. U)>s 



WORLD & NATION BRIEFS 



Report reveals jet in 
crash was too high 

TAIPEI, Taiwan — A China Airlines jet that 
crashedlast week near Taipei airport, killing 202 
people, was flying well above the standard alti- 
tude when it approached the runway, a newspa- 
per reported Sunday. 

Radar showed that when the Airbus A300- 
600R was about three miles from the airport, the 
jetliner was flying at 1.300 feet, much higher 
than the standard 900-foot approach, the China 
Times Express said. 

The pilots attempted to descend quickly to 
correct the mistake, the paper said, quoting 
unidentiricd aviation sources. 

No official reason for the plane's crash has 
been given, but investigators say the plane 
veered riiaiply to the left as it came in to land. It 
then Clashed into a semi-rural area beside the 
niBway and exploded, killing all aboard and six 
people on the ground. 

About a week after the crash, only 32 of the 



victims have been identified by DNA 
comparisons demanded by police 
before any bodies can be released 
newspapers reported. 

Most bodies were badly charred and dis- 
membered, making identification possible only 
by DNA comparison or dental records. 

Pope exhorts 22 new 
cardinals 

VATICAN CITY - Bestowing simple gold- 
en rings on the Roman Catholic Church's 
newest cardinals Sunday, Pope John Paul II 
reminded them that their job is more than just 
electing his successor. 

In a special Mass of the Rings, the pontiff 
exhorted them to look toward Christianity's 
third millennium, which he called an '^occasion 
of renewal for believers." 

The new millennium, he said, should signal 
"an extraordinary springtime of hope for ... all 
humanity." 




Pofiticai quarrels turn deadly 
as parties battle for power 



INDIA: Parliamentary 
elections surrounded by 
violence, claim 12 lives 



By Ranjan Roy 

The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI, India - Bloody 
political clashes marred voting 
Sunday in India's parliamentary 
elections, which look place amid 
another distraction - the sudden col- 
lapse of the government in the coun- 
try's largest stale. 

Twelve people were killed in fac- 
tional violence. Nearly 40 others 
were injured across the nine states 
that voted. 

The turnout was 55 percent - 
slightly below average - on the sec- 
ond day of a six-day election, which 
completed voting for three-fourths 
of the 543 districts at stake. More 
than 600 million Indians are eligible 
to vote. 

By Saturday, all but a few votes 
will be in, and ballot counting begins 
March 2. 

Most deaths Sunday were report- 
ed from the eastern state of Bihar, 
where 20 people were killed in the 
first round of voting Feb. 16. 

Gunmen shot and killed a commu- 
nist supporter inside a polling booth. 

Seven other people were killed in 
shootouts between rival gangs fight- 
ing for control of polling booths in 
different parts of the state. One f>er- 
son caught stuffing bogus ballot 
papers was beaten to death with 
sticks by activists of a rival political 
group. 

"It this democracy? Whoever has 
more activists around a booth cap- 
tures and prevents genuine voters," 
said Mohammad Idris, of Hajipur 
town in Bihar, who was turned back 
by political activists who said his vote 
had already been cast. 

In the neighboring state of Orissa. 
one policeman was killed. when leftist 
guerrillas attacked a security car car- 
rying guards. 

Two people died in West Bengal 
state. 

Widespread rigging of voles also 
was reported, forcing election 
authorities to. suspend polling in sev- 
eral booths. 

More than 550 political activists, 
including two state government min- 
isters, were arrested on charges of 
disrupting elections. 




The Asyxidted Pr«i 

Sushila Ray casts her vote with 
the help of her rwphew. 

"People are tired of elections. 
They have come too soon," said 
Madhukar Gawli, a voter in western 
Nagpur. 

The elections are the second in 
less than three years - a result of 
inconclusive results from the 1996 
vote. 

As the voting proceeded, the 
country's attention was drawn to* 
Uttar Pradesh, the largest state, 
where the government was suddenly 
toppled overnight. 

The maneuver by small-party 
defectors could have national reper- 
cussions because the ousted govern- 
ment was controlled by the Hindu 
nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party. 

The BJP is predicted to emerge 
from the national vote with the most 
number of seats, but without a 
majority. Uttar Pradesh sends 85 
members to Parliament, more than 
any other state. 

BJP's candidate for prime minis- 
ter, Atal Bihari Vajpayee, declared a 
hunger strike in protest, alleging the 
dismissal was a coup aimed at seizing 
the state machinery to influence the 
voting. 

A new government led by a tiny 
splinter party was sworn in late 
Saturday. 

Apathy and fear of violence kept 
the turnout down in areas besides 
Bihar, including the tea-growing hills 
of southern Tamil Nadu state, where 
54 people were killed in bombings 
just before elections began. The vote 
continues Monday, Saturday, March 
7 and, in a remote mountain region, 
June 21. 



The pope named 22 new cardinals 
from 1 3 different countries, but three 
did not attend the ceremonies. One 
Italian cardinal was in the hospital and 
the identities of two new cardinals remains 
a secret, most likely for political reasons. Vatican 
observers say they may be from China or 
Vietnam, where the church is suppressed. 

Like the pontiff, most of the new cardinals 
are by4he-book conservatives. John Paul has 
now named 106 -or 86 percent -of the 123 car- 
dinak eligible to choose his successor. Only car- 
dinals under age 80 may vote for pope. 

Southern Gilifomia has 
best tap water 

BERKELEY SPRINGS, W Va. - The 

Metropolitan Water District of Southern 
California bills itself as the largest purveyor of 
treated water in the world. 

Now it can call itself the best in the nation. 

The district topped 42 water samples from 18 



states Saturday night to win the municipal divi- 
sion at the "Toast to the Tap: International 
Water Tasting and Competition " 

The district, which finished fourth last year, 
beat out first-time entry Montpdier, Ohio, fol- 
lowed by Huntington Station, N.Y; Dover, Del.; 
and Kent, Ohio, which also was fifth last year 
and first in 19%. 

In the noncarbonated water category, 
McKenzie Mist of Blue River, Ore., finished 
fu^t in a field of 37. 

Oaza Tesanj, a product from Bosnia- 
Herzegovina that was sent to Berkeley Springs 
by a Red Cross volunteer who knew of the com- 
petition, won first place out of 10 entries in the 
sparkling water category. 

The water-tasting contest at the Coolfont 
Resort is similar to wine-tasting. Judges exam- 
ine, sniff and taste samples that are rated on 
appearance, odor, flavor, mouth feel and after- 
taste. But it IS the water without taste or smell 
that wins bragging rights. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin wire reports. 



Monday, February 23, 1998 



Daily Bruin News 



STATE ^ LOCAL 



Three juries make for logistical nightmare 



TRIAL Each suspect to 
be tried separately by 
attorney in murder case 



By Unda Deutsch 

The Associated Press 

Prosecutors often get nervous 
about opening statements to the 
jury. But there's not much to com- 
pare with the challenge facing 
Deputy District Attorney Craig 



Hum when he stands up Monday to 
give three opening statements \to 
three separate juries in the Haing 
Ngor murder trial. 

"Logistically the real challenge 
will be keeping everyone straight," 
said Hum, who is handling the high- 
profile murder case of three men 
charged in the 1996 shooting death 
of the Cambodian-born Ngor, 55, 
who won an Oscar for his role in the 
movie "The Killing Fields." 

Movement and positioning of 
jurors in the courtroom will be so 



tricky throughout the trial that the 
process will require choreography of 
sorts, using color<oding. charts, 
maps, badges and a video system. 

The defendants, alleged members 
of the Oriental Lazyboys, a 
Chinatown street gang, are accused 
of killing Ngor in a robbery outside 
his home. Their lawyers initially 
asked for three separate trials 
because the defendants had made 
tape-recorded statements potential- 
See NGOR, page 14 



Weather phenomenon ravages 
tourism, businesses along coast 

ELNlfJO: Continuing storms ruin vacations, 
leaving large financial impact on Californians 



By Jennifer Bowles 

The Associated Press 

No way was Lula Snell going to 
make her annual trip to California 
this winter - even though she would 
miss her grandson's second birthday 
in Sacramento. 

"It's flooding," the Oklahoma 



City woman exclaimed over the tele- 
phone. "To me that's not a vacation. 
Why should I leave a perfectly dry 
place for that?" 

Up and down California, where 
generally favorable weather makes 
the Golden State a year-round desti- 

s««iirE«nrai,|M9ei2 



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Daily Bniin News 



REAQION 



T 



From page 4 

Prime Minister Tony Blair. White 
House spokesman Joe Lockhart said 
that Clinton and Blair agreed to look 
closely at the details of any arrange- 
ment. 

To emphasize US. readiness to acr? 
if the national interest is threatened, 
Cohen announced on NBC's "Meet 
the Press" that he was making the 
first request for reservists to provide 
combat support for the 32,000 troops 
stationed in the Persian Gulf. "We 
are hoping for a peaceful solution, 



but we are prepared to exercise a mil- 
itary option if necessary," he said. 

The Pentagon said Cohen was ask- 
ing President Clinton for authority to 
call about 500 members of the 
National Guard and Reserve for 
logistical support. If approved, 
Cohen would then ask the services to 
^ecide whom to activate. Cohen said, 
' wkfiout sp^ecifics, that people would 
be mobili7ed from various bases. 

Administration officials said 
Annan lc(t for kaq fully aware that 
there could be no maneuvering room 
on the key issues of total access and 
operational control for U.N. 
weapons inspectors. The Iraqi ftc** 



Jf^:*^ 



posal of putting a time limit on 
inspections was unacceptable, they 
said. 

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said 
on ABC that he was "very nervous" 
about investing any negotiating 
authority in Annan when it was 
American lives that would be on the 
line in a military conflict. "We should- 
n't have set up this scenario that the 
Secretary General of the U.N is mak- 
ing those decisions." McCain said. 

He and other senators said 
Congress is prepared to approve a 
resolution of support for military 
action but only if it includes backing 
for a long-term plan to end Saddam's 



ability to menace the world. "We 
have to be prepared to go the full dis- 
tance, which is to do everything possi- . 
ble to disrupt his regime and to 
encourage the forces of democracy," 
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., said on 
ABC. 

Both chambers could take up Iraqi 
resolutions this week. National 
Security Adviser Sandy Berger, on 
"Fox News Sunday." repeated the 
administration position that it would 
welcome congressional backing, but 
he said, "I don't think we believe we 
need it as a legal matter. But, obvious- 
ly, it would be a preferable way to pro- 
ceed." 



SNOWBOARDING 

From page 3 

Mountain. 

Joining the snowboardiog team 
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skills. Not quite ready for the half- 
pipe. Stein prefers freestyle and 
freeriding. 

Rockwell describes the maneu- 
vers judged in the freestyle and half- 
pipe competitions as divided into 
various grabs, spins and inverts. A 

See SNOWMMRMIW, page 1 1 



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SNOWBOARDING 

FroinpagelO 

grab is when the rider touches his board 
while he's in the air. Spins are rated by 
how many degrees the rider turns as he 
flics ofT a jump or the lip of the half- 
pipe, and inverts are backflips. 
Rockwell explains that "you get rated 
on how big you go, variety of moves, 
and fluidity." 

David Cash, a third-year anthropol- 
ogy student, prefers freeriding to 
freestyle. "If you took a surfer, I'm 
more of a longboard surfer - a soul 
surfer. I go on the mountain to make 



big turns." 

Cash skied for 10 years before trying 
his hand at snowboarding. "There's so 
much to pay attention to when you're 
skiing. You have to worry about keep- 
ing your feet together and your poles. 
On a snowboard, you can be more cre- 
ative. You're one mechanism going 
down the hill." 

Newcomers to the sport may feel 
more like one mechanism face-first in 
the snow. For beginners, Rockwell 
advises that you borrow a board from a 
friend or rent one the first couple of 
times. He recommends making a day 
trip out to Snow Summit with a group 
of friends who are also learning to 



snowboard so as not to get too frustrat- 
ed. 

If possible, take a lesson and be sure 
to wear clothing that will keep you dry. 

"Because if you get wet, you'll be 
miserable," Rockwell assures. 

Anyone interested in buying used 
equipment should contact either 
Rockwell or Ishibashi via the Wooden 
Center. For those prepared to buy a 
new set. Stein recommends Val Surf in 
North Hollywood. 

This season's gear may run from 
$500 to $800 for boots, bindings and a 
board. 

If donning the latest innovations in 
technology and design is not your pri- 



mary concern, a set from last season 
will run for considerably less. 

On the upper body, wear a light shirt 
and fleece under a water-proof outer 
shell, snow pants to keep dry, and 
gloves with reinforcements in the 
hands especially designed for snow- 
boarding. 

According to Chris Dufly, manager* 
of Val Surf, the best-selling brands in 
both equipment and clothing are 
Burton. Morrow, K2, Joyride, Lamar 
and Sims. For daily updates on snow- 
boarding conditions all over the world, 
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In California, Snow Summit at Big 



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snowboard parks, half-pipes, snow- 
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A warning to all novice snowboard- 
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sport. 

Stein plans to move to Lake Tahoe 
after graduation to be a snow bum. 
Cash has his heart set on the slopes of 
Colorado and Ishibashi claims he'll be 
in the Olympics. 

"I told my parents I'm going to be in 
the Olympics in four years," he said. 
"My mother said, you're going to col- 
lege so you can be a snowboarder?" 



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Daily Bruin News 



WEATHER 



Daily Bruin News 



From page 6 , , 

nation, tourism is getating dumped on 
by El Niiio. 

The Pacific weather phenomenon is 
pouring torrential rains on amusement 
parks and zoos and scuttling whale-* 
watching cruises and other boating 
trips with storm-tossed seas. 

"If the sun is out, it's just gang- 
busters. But we had only one decent 
day over President's Day weekend, so 
that has a tremendous etl'ect." said 
Terry Koenig, vice president of sales 
and marketing for Blue & Gold Fleet, 



which runs boating tours to Alcatraz 
Island, one of San Francisco's top 
attractions. 

The 25 percent to 50 percent drop 
in business has been enough to force 
layoffs and budget cuts, Koenig said. 

"We're rather philosophical about 
it. There's nothing you can do." he 
said. "We know we really have to 
make hay when the sun does come 
out." 

The lack of sunshine even put the 
skids on the filming of a commercial 
touting the state as a destination for 
romance. The ad, from the California 
Division of Tourism, is supposed to 
feature a couple in a row boat unjjer a 



sun-drenched stone bridge at Stow 
Lake in San Francisco's Golden Gate 
Park. 

"We've been delayed for the last 
month. We needed two consistent days 
of sunshine and we haven't had it, " 
said state tourism director John 
Poimiroo. Filming finally began 
Friday. 

While statewide figures on the 
financial impact of El Nino have yet to 
be tabulated, economists say it's hard 
to imagine the impact is not severe. 

"People have lost money, that is the 
bottom line." said Jack Kyser, chief 
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Angeles. "And they're losing business 
that they can't make up." 

While officials at Disneyland and 
the Universal Studios tour are refusing 
to release attendance figures during 
this wet winter, they do admit that 
sales of umbrellas and ponchos are up 
at the parks. 

Trams that meander through mas- 
sive Universal complex are outfitted 
with clear sheeting that drops on either 
side to protect visitors from showers. 
Schedules of outdoor shows are rejig- 
gered to get the most in on a rainy day. 

"You do the best you can," said 
spokesman Jim'Yeager. 

While El Nino may be cursing most 



of the state, it's been a blessing for 
California mountains, delighting 
skiers with record snows. 

"We are the traditional contrarians 
in the tourism industry, and this is 
shaping up to be a very good year for 
the ski resorts," said Bob Roberts, 
executive director of the California Ski 
Industry Association. 

At Mammoth Mountain in the east- 
ern Sierra Nevada, 129 inches of snow 
have fallen so far this month compared 
to just six inches last February, accord-, 
ing to spokeswoman Joani Saari. 

And the 1 10 inches of snow that has 

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Monday, Febniary 23, 1998 13 



WEATHER 



From page 12 

draped Bear Mountain ski resort in the 
San Bernardino Mountains of 
Southern California so far this winter 
already has surpassed last year's sea- 
son total of 102.5 inches, spokes- 
woman Judi Bowers said. 

Along California's scenic coast, El 
NiAo has swirled up colossal waves 
that have boosted surfboard rentals 
and wetsuit sales at Malibu Ocean 
Sports, said employee Terry Morich. 

Rental of kayaks, though, are dra- 
matically down. 



"People are leery about the size of 
the surf and justifiably so," Morich 
said. "Often people will come down, 
we'll evaluate the conditions and 
they'll decide to head to the Malibu 
Inn and have a beer instead." 

Island Packers is also feeling the 
brunt of El Nirto-generated swells, 
having run only five whale-watching 
trips in the Santa Barbara Channel this 
month, compared to daily trips last 
February. 

"If this continues much longer, I'm 
really going to start to get concerned," 
said co-owner Mark Connally. 

Those who work in California's 
tourism industry are, of course, trying 



to put a positive spin on the soggy cli- 
mate. 

"You can experience a lot of 
Disneyland indoors and just dash 
from attraction to attraction. You're 
not running that far," insists 
spokesman Tom Brocato. 

Of course, the rides are spread over 
85 acres and the lines do tend to be out- 
side, along with many of the rides 
themselves. 

Napa Valley's wine country encour- 
ages callers to take advantajge of the 
off-season, emphasizing that wineries 
are even less packed because of the 
storms. 

"Sometimes it's more fun to visit a 



winery in the off weather because 
(winemakers) can spend more time 
with you and it's not crowded," said 
Lane Turchet of the Napa Sonoma 
Wine Country Visitor Service Center. 

At the San Diego Zoo, spokes- 
woman Georgeanne Irvine said some 
animals - including polar bears, hip- 
popotamus and pigs - are likely to be 
more active in the rain. 

The zoo, though, has taken precau- 
tions in the face of El Niflo^ trimming 
trees to prevent branches from falling 
onto exhibits, and stocking up on food 
and sandbags. 

"There is danger of erosion on 
some of the hillsides and flooding in 



the canyon areas," Irvine said. 

During a respite in the rain late last 
week, the sun sparkled off the Pacific 
as the Allen family of Slough, England, 
cavorted on the Santa Monica Pier - 
rebuilt and reinforced after it was vir- 
tually destroyed in the last major El 
Ninom 1983. 

This year's El Nii^o wasn't about to 
stop the family of four from coming to 
California on a February school break. 

"No way at all," said Mark Allen, 
42. "If you're going to go, you're going 
logo." 

Besides, said his wife, Denise, "it's 
nothing compared to England's 

weather." ' 

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• It's time to get ready for the 1998 Overnight Program! 

• 300 Students have been invited to UCLA 

and we need your help! 

• If you would like to share your college experience 

with a high school senior, come to one of the following 

information sessions! 



WEEK 7 
Monday, Febniary 23rd at 7:00pnfi 
Tuesday, February 24th at SrOOpm 
Thursday, February 26th at 5:30pm 

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Monday, March 2nd at 5:30pm 
Monday, March 2nd at 7:00pm 
Wednesday, March 4th at 5:30pm 



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Ifyou are a current On-Campus Housing Resident and are 
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NGOR 



From page 6 

ly implicating themselves and each 
other in the crime. 

The law severely limits use of 
such statements, particularly if a 
defendant does not testify. 

Rather than order the cumber- 
some procedure of three separate 
trials with many of the same witness- 
es. Los Angeles County Superior 
Court Judge J.D. Smith came up 
with the solution of having one trial 
with three separate juries. 



The courtroom will be 
equipped with a video 
... system similar to one 

used in the OJ. 
Simpson criminal trial. 



The three-jury procedure has 
been used only once before in 
California - in a San Diego case - 
and the judge there called it "an 
extremely stressful event." 

Jurors will be shuttled out of the 
courtroom periodically when testi- 
mony is being heard that doesn't 
-apply to their defendant. Each panel 
will be brought in separately to hear 
opening statements, and the three 
groups will not be allowed to talk to 
each other. 

Smith conducted three separate 
jury selections over the pah^month, 
with each group niling out question- 
naires and each panel chosen from a 
pool of 100 prospects. 

"It seemed to go very smoothly," 
said Superior Court spokeswoman 
Jerrianne Hayslett. "Judge Smith 
has tried cases with two juries 
before, so that experience helped 
him out." 

But no courtroom in the busy 
downtown Criminal Courts 
Building ever has accommodated 
this many jurors before. There are 
36 regular panelists and 12 alter- 
nates. They will fill chairs in the jury 
box, in two rows in front of the jury 
box and two rows of the spectator 
section. 

The jury seats are color-coded, 
with a chart above the jury box pro- 
viding a seating roadmap. Jury No. 
I is green. No. 2 is red, No. 3 is blUe. 
Jurors will wear colored dots on 
their badges coordinating with their 
places in court. 

Each group will be assigned one 
of the defendants: Tak Sun Tan, 21; 
Indra Lim, 20, and Jason Chan. 20, 
who are charged with killing Ngor 
outside his home near downtown on 
Feb. 25, 1996. 

They know there are three juries 
but have not been told why the pro- 
cedure is being used. 

Authorities allege they were rob- 
bing Ngor and shot him when he 
refused to hand over a gold locket 
containing a picture of his wife, who 
died during the genocidal reign of 
the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. 

Ngor himself was tortured and 

AGREEMENT 



imprisoned by the regime, which 
killed an estimated 2 million people 
from 1975-1979. He came to the 
United States in 1980. 

The case has been complicated by 
suspicions within the Cambodian 
community that Ngor was killed 
because of his political beliefs or 
business activities. 

Hum maintains the motive was 
simply a street crime by a gang 
known for carjackings and home 
invasion robberies. 

Public defenders representing the 
three men have said that police 
arrested the wrong people. 

However, Deputy Public 
Defender Steven Schoenfield 
declined comment for this story, say- 
ing all defense attorneys had decid- 
ed to remain silent. 

It is not known whether each wilf 
deliver an opening statement at the 
outset or wait until later in the tria 

There are puzzles about the case. 
Ngor's $6,000 Rolex watch was 
taken and never recovered but the 
robbers left his Mercedes-Benz and 
$2,900 he carried inside a jacket. 

No gun or witnesses to the crime 
have turned up. 

During a preliminary hearing, the 
prosecution's star witness recanted 
his .testimony, saying police pres- 
siired him into stating that he saw 
the three young men running from 
the murder scene. But Hum said 
such recantations are common in 
gang cases and he expects the wit- 
ness to appear at the trial. 

With all 48 jurors often viewing 
evidence at the same time, the court- 
room will be equipped with a video 
projection system similar to one 
used in the O.J. Simpson criminal 
trial. It allows for easy viewing of 
crime scene photos and other physi- 
cal evidence. 

"Wc will need three sets of all 
exhibits," said Hum, noting that 
when the juries deliberate each will 
be in a separate jury room examin- 



If convictions result, 

all three juries will 

have to remain for a 

penalty phase of the 

trial. 



ing the items in question. 

If convictions result, all three 
juries will have to remain for a 
penalty phase of the trial, since the 
charges carry a potential death 
penalty. 

And if opening statements seem 
complicated, "closing arguments are 
going to be a real nightmare," Hum 
said, with the prosecutor required to 
segregate evidence presented to 
each jury separately. 

The duration of the three-jury 
trial is uncertain. 

"We have to keep 48 people 
healthy," Hum noted. "If one gets 
sick and it's only for a day, then all 
three juries would have to be in 
recess for that day. It could lengthen 
the trial." . ,i 



From page 5 

Annan met with the Iraqi leader 
after talks with Aziz since Friday 
failed to resolve the last major obsta- 
cle - Iraq's demand for a time limit on 
inspections of presidential com- 
pounds. 

Eckhard said that time limits were 
not part of the agreementr»but that 
said details of the deal would first be 
presented to the Security Council. 

The United States and other coun- 
cil members had rejected any dead- 
line. 

Tb- U.N. inspectors are trying to 
determine if Iraq has complied with 
UN. orders, issued at the end of the 



1991 Persian Gulf War, to destroy all 
long-range missiles and weapons of 
mass destruction. That condition 
must be met before U.N. economic 
sanctions can be lifted. 

Before the announcement, British 
Foreign Secretary Robin Cook said 
in London that the United Nations 
could consider lifting the sanctions if 
Saddam gives Annan a written 
promise to comply with the inspec- 
tions. 

"If he would comply ... and if he 
really is willing this time to cooperate 



(C 



COMPETITION 

From page 1 



Many judges participated in 
Moot Court during their law school 
years. Hankin is a self-proclaimed 
"Moot Court junkie." 

Patent attorney Robert Allen, a 
UCLA Law School graduate, 
remembered how he decided to 
become involved in the program on 
the first day of law school. 

"The guy from the Moot Court 
who spoke at my orientation was so 
dynamic," he said. "I was so excited 
that I couldn't wait to get involved." 

Allen has judged at the Moot 
Court competition every semester 
for five years. 

The case that law students argued 
pertains to a real issue in law that is 
currently unresolved. 

The Moot Court executive board 
makes up the case every year. 

They argued the case of Sarah D. 
Baker, who filed a civil suit against 
the hospital which fired her after she 
was pricked with a needle of an HIV- 
positive patient and became infected 
with the virus. 

Students argued whether the 
plaintiff was qualified to perform 
her job and if she had reasonable 
accommodations. 

States throughout the nation have 
dealt with the issue of whether 
health care workers who test HIV- 
positive should continue their 



more 



employment. 

Students, however, said 
about how the ' cdmpetition 
improved their spealciiig skills than 
their knowledge of case law. 

"Work on your demeanor," Moot 
Court Judge Wolpert suggested in 
comments to an advocate after a 
round. 

Many students reiterated that 
they learned about etiquette in the 
courtroom. 

"1 learned not to be rude to 
judges." said Heather Moosnick, 
second-year law student. 

"It's better to embarrass yourself 
in front of your peers than to fall on 
your face in the real world," she 
said. 

The best advocates from the 
series of Moot Court competitions, 
including this one, will compete at 
the state and national level during 
the next school yearT 

"Every year students make the 
same mistakes and learn from round 
to round," Hankin said. 

"Other law schools spend money 
hiring professional coaches and 
offering academic credit. Because 
UCLA is a state school and compet- 
itive academically, students are not 
as well trained as at other schools," 
he said. 

"This year UCLA came in second 
overall (at the Western Regional 
competitions). That truly attests to 
the fact that the students are doing a 
good job," he said. 




CHARLES KUO/D*ly Bfum 

(Left to right) Third-year law student W^ndy Stanford and attorneys 
Kathy Vanderriel and Andrew Thomas act as Moot Court judges. 



CAMPAIGN 



From page 5 



Efforts at that time to enact legis- 
lation were thwarted by dual fili- 
busters. McConnell, Lott and most 
other Republicans refused to allow a 
vote on the measure drafted by 
McCain ^nd Democratic Sen. 
Russell Feingold (D-Wis). 

At the same time, they proposed 
legislation to require organized labor 
to obtain the written consent of their 
members before spending compulso- 
ry union dues on political cam- 
paigns. 



1 



Democrats 
promptly 
labeled that a 
"poison pill" 
and mounted a 
filibuster of 
their own. 

In the end, 
neither side got 
the 60 votes 
needed to 

advance its pro- 
posal and the 
legislation was 
shelved. 

The McCain-Feingold bill, backed 
by all 45 Senate Democrats and a 
handful of Republicat^s, would ban 
unregulated "soft money" to nation- 
al political parties from corpora- 
tions, labor unions and individuals. 
It also provides fresh curbs on adver- 
tisements that attack candidates but 
escape regulation because they are 
presented as "issue ads" not covered 
by existing election law. 

While supporters of the measure 
say changes are necessary to curtail 



The struggle over 

union political activity 

has become a critical 

element of campaign 

reform. 



abuses of the current system, some 
Republicans argue they infringe on 
the Constitution. 

"Be it bumper stickers on your 
car, yard signs on your law ... or a 
voluntary contribution of your own 
hard-earned money to the candi- 
dates of party of your choosing - 
these are all constitutionally protect- 
ed means of participation in our 
democracy," McConnell said 
Saturday in his radio address. 
Recent public opinion polling 
offers no hint of 
^^^^^^^^^ a groundswell of 
support for the 
measure that 
McCain and 
Feingold have 
advocated for 
years. 

"It's not an 

issue the public 

lists when asked 

what they think 

; is important," 

concedes Sen. 

Carl Levin (D-Mich). At the same 

time, he said, "when asked, they say, 

'We don't think you guys are going 

to do it, but you sure should."' 

The struggle over union political 
activity has become a critical ele- 
ment of campaign reform. 

Republicans complain that orga- 
nized labor uses compulsory union 
dues to fund campaigns against the 
very GOP candidates that rank-and- 
file union workers support. 



Daily Bruin News 



Monday, Wxuary 23, 1998 15 



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An Evening 
with bestselling author 






iyania Vanzant 




Thursday, March 5th 
6pm 

James West Alumni Center 



lyania Vanzant was hailed by Emerge magazine as 
one of the "most dynamic Alrican-American speakers 
in the country." Come see this nationally recognized 
inspirational speaker and bestselling author of several 
books on self-empowerment, personal growth, and 
spiritual healing, including Acts of Faith, The Value in 
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A VIACOM COAPAMV 



ANTHRAX 



From page 4 

weapon. 

Leavitt was rele4$ed from jail 
Saturday night on his own recog- 
nizance. 

Although the anthrax vaccine is 
legal and safe, the charges were still 
pending against the men. Leavitt's 
attorneys said federal prosecutors 
should drop the charges. Harris' 
attorney did not return calls for 
comment over the weekend. 

Leavitt's attorneys contend he 
had no intention of using the mater- 
ial as a weapon, but was instead 
planning to use it to test an unortho- 
dox disease-killing machine he was 
considering buying for $2 million 
from a man who would become an 
FBI informant. 

That informant, RoQ^ld 
Rockwell, lias said he turned in 
Leavitt and Harris last week when 
Leavitt claimed to possess military- 
grade anthrax, which could kill 
thousands oPpeople. Leavitt's attor- 
neys said Rockwell is a con artist 
who double-crossed Leavitt and 
Harris when the deal to buy the 
machine turned sour. 



Leavitt has a fire safety supply 
company in Las Vegas and has also 
been involved in nontraditional 
research seeking cures for AIDS 
and multiple sclerosis. 

Leavitt's friends said they were 
relieved that he was released from 
jail. 

"I just knew that whatever it was, 
he wasn't doing what they said he 
was doing," said Jeff Buynak, who 
rents a small one-story house from 
Leavitt "I was hoping that they 
would find what I know about him. 
He's a good, honest citizen and 
works hard." h 



DIXON 



From page 1 

He .claims he was never subject to 
severe treatment. 

"I was exposed to different 
extremes and types of environments, 
but I never really encountered insti- 
tutionalized racism," Dixon said. 

'I went to UCLA back in 1993 to 
start a Family Medicine Practice 
Residency, and I kind of got the hint 
that it wasn't really the liberal school 
that they played themselves up to 
be," he said, "i also fdt like I was 
being overly criticized and scruti- 
nized." 

The Department of Family 
Medicine's program lasts for three 
years. After the first year, interns 
become eligible to receive their med- 
ical license from the state board. 

Dixon was terminated two 
months before receiving his certifi- 
cate, which would have enabled him 
to get his medical license. 

According to Lomax, the mis- 
takes the university is claiming 
resulted in Dixon's dismissal are typ- 
ical of first-year interns. 

However, according to Robinson, 
when the School of Medicine admits 
students into the residency program, 
they intend to see those students 
through completion. 

"We try very hard to keep people 
in the program (and) we admit peo- 
ple with the expectation that they will 
complete the program," he said. 

"We only have a limited number 
of residency positions available, and 
we always have more applicants than 
positions," Robinson said, adding 
there are usually 580 residency posi- 
tions to be filled. 

He added that it is highly uncom- 
mon for residents to be terminated. 

Although she expects the case to 
be resolved this year, Lomax said 
that the longer the case takes, the fur- 
ther Dixon will be from his goal. 

"For almost four years now, he 
has been doing menial jobs," Lomax 
said. 

"He didn't exactly go through all 
this training to become a taxi driver." 



MM ^ iW » ■ I , I 



'■■■!!<■ 11 >■ 



Daily Bniin Htm 



AGREEMENT 



From page 14 



.P^ 



and not continue u^^id^ive and 
delay, that (liftinpthe^pictions) 
could be done in the fairly near 
future," Cook said on British 
Broadcasting Corp. radio. 

The talks began after Annan 
arrived Friday in a visit seen as a last- 
ditch attempt to resolve the crisis 
peacefully. 

Previous sticking points had 
included the composition of teams 
that would inspect the sites. France 
and Russia have proposed that diplo- 
mats accompany inspectors from the 
U.N. Special Commission, which is 
in charge of the inspections. 

Television footage showed Annan 
greeting Saddam, who was dressed in 
a dark, double-breasted suit, and 
Aziz, who wore a military uniform^. 

Annan and his eight-member team 
negotiated with Iraqi officials around 
the clock Saturday in a series of meet- 
ings that ended at 2 a.m. The talks 
resumed later Sunday morning at the 
Iraqi Foreign Ministry. After that, 
Annan met Saddam. 

In a commentary Sunday, the 
newspaper Al-Thawra, which reflects 
the thinking of the ruling Arab Baath 
Socialist Party, called the demand for 
unrestricted access "illogical and 
unrealistic." 

Iraq maintains that granting such 
access to the very homes of the presi- 
dent trample on its dignity and 
national sovereignty. 

Baghdad also says it has destroyed 
the proscribed weapyons. 



Monday, Felmiary 23, 1998 17 



CAMPAIGN 



From page 1 5 

They describe as "paycheck pro- 
tection" their proposal to ban this, 
and McConnell argued strongly for 
it in his Republican radio address. 
"Millions of Americans currently 
see a portion of each paycheck con-' 
fiscated by labor unions and used - 
against the workers' will - to 
advance a political agenda," he said. 
"This is wrong and must be 
stopped." 

Efforts to forge a compromise on 
the issue of union dues faltered last 
fall, but Snowe has recently been 
working to rekindle that effort. 

Her proposal requires speedy dis- 
closure of contributors to any broad- 
cast commercials targeting specific 
candidates for ofiice within 30 days 
of a primary or 60 days of a general 
election. 

In addition, it prohibits the use of 
union or corporate funds for such 
ads. It would "simply require fund- 
ing to come from sources tradition- 
ally relied upon for campaign pur- 
poses - PACs (political action com- 
mittees) or individual, voluntary 
donors," according to a summary of 
the legisUtion. 



DOMESTIC 



From page 1 

fully support this bill," she said. 

MacLeod noted that if Wilson 
supports the measure, it has a better 
chance of passing. 

She insisted that even if the bill 
does not pass, it may force UCs to 
hold off implementation until delib- 
erations on the bill are complete. 

MacLeod also claimed that 
Knight is a bigot. 

"Senator Knight is homophobic, 
our equivalent of Jesse Helms. He 
believes homosexuals should have no 
rights," MacLeod said. 

Many advocates say that Knight's 
new bill is just discrimination. 

Several years ago Knight authored 
a bill that would have voided out-of- 
state gay marriages in California. 

Knight's office insisted that 
Knight's motivations are based 
purely on public opinion and not 
bigotry. 




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UCLflsTORT 



18 Mondiy,Febny(y23,1998 



Daily Brain Viewpoint 



VIEWPOINT 



vinvpoint#niedia.uda.edu 



EDnX)RIAL 



Restoring the guiding principles of ASUCLA 



MISSION: Association has recently been failing to 
deliver the services it was originally created for 



Over time, things are lost. 
Guiding principles or goals 
are sometimes forgotteji 
Through the years. Apparently, the 
leaders of the student's association 
have forgotten the tnie meaning 
and mission of ASUCLA, since it 
hardly seems to serve the purpose 
it was created to carry out. 
ASUCLA stands for the 
Associated Students of UCLA, 
not the Associated Stores of 
UCLA, as it currently appears. 
In 1919, students formed an 
association to assist and support 
the needs of the student body. 
ASUCLA created a mission state- 
ment: "to satisfy the needs and 
wants of its constituents by provjd- 
ing products, services and facilities 



in a student-centered organization 
that values participatory decision- 
making." 

What we want are services help- 
ing students, such as a textbook 
library or computing services in 
the student union. What we need is 
the return of student lounges 
which have been converted to 
office spaces students have no 
access to. What we need is to 
restore the "student-centered orga- 
nization" ASUCLA was meant to 
be, not the money-driven corpora- 
tion it has become. 

Ackerman Union opened in 
1961 to serve as the central student 
union. Primary purposes of a stu- 
dent union are to bring students 
together in a relaxing and social 



environment and to provide sever- 
al services to students in one cen- 
tral location. Ackerman Student 
Union housed a bowling alley 
many years ago, as well a travel 
agency and lots of lounge space 
for students. 

However, in the 1990s, Amidst a 
Hnancial crisis, ASUCLA began 
looking for a way to cover its loss- 
es. 

Enter the new and improved 
Ackerman Union of 1997 - a shop- 
ping mall of UCLA logo-bearing 

clothing, and of course the 

Clinique counter. The new 1 



Ackerman reflected the new ASU- 
CLA - a corporation hungry to 
gel out of the red. 

But while the new student union 
boasted of a huge new UCLA 
Store (the envy of many other col- 
lege campuses), Ackerman was 
stripped of meeting areas, study 



lounges and a social core. With 
more shopping areas and restau- 
rant space than lounges and recre- 
ational rooms, the union may as 
well be renamed Westwood 
Shopping Gaiieria. 

What ever happened to helping 
and providing services to students 
rather than blatantly scamming 
students with overpriced parapher- 
nalia and brand name merchan- 
dise? 

Contrary to what's stated in the 
mission statement, ASUCLA 
_yields little, if any, benefit to stu- 
dents, aside from providing gross- 
ly overpriced merchandise. A stu- 
dent union should be a social cen- 
ter for collejge students. Other 
campuses have pool tables, ping- 
pong tables and relaxing rooms in 
which to study and socialize. What 
ever happ>ened to our travel 
agency and our reading rooms? 



The student union, and students, 
would reap more benefits if 
ofTered child care and counseling, 
computer rooms and a textbook 
library similar to USAC's 
Booklending program. 

As far as social activities, 
Ackerman could stage dancing 
and karaoke for leisure, even fire- 
places and big sofas for studying 
and'socializing. The student union 
needs to be reclaimed by the stu- 
dents and for the students, not by 
money hungry businesses and 
franchises. 

ASUCLA needs to be reminded 
of their purpose and before 
increasing student fees for useless 
causes that cater to only a select 
minority of big-spenders, they 
should put the money to good use 
- a student union that we can 
enjoy without doling out cash 
we're already strapped for. 



«M 4'«Mk<ta., 



Vision 



the 



Chancellor Camesale 
talks about some of his 
experiences at UCLA and 
— what Ues ahead 



fufur 



By Adam Yamagudii 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

At the helm of a world renovnied 
institution of over 35.0QP students sits 
one man - Chancellor Albert 
Camesale. He's responsible for lead- 
ing the university into the next centur>. 
ready to tackle the many obstacles set 
to challenge UCLA in the coming 
years. Perhaps most prominent among 
them is life after Proposition 209. The 
university must confront a host of 
other issues, such as securing adequate 
funds in the face of dwindling funding 
support from the state and increasing 
costs of operating, and upholding and 
improving the qual- 
ity of education at 
UCLA. In a recent 
interview with The 
Bruin. Camesale 
discussed his view 
of the university. 

men the UC 
Regents were in the 
process of appoint- 
ing the next chan- 
cellor for UCLA. 
tHV things were 
usually assiKiated 
with you: your pre- 
vious positi(m at 
Harvard and your 
fund raising capaci- 
ty. Fund raising 
was looked upon as 
one of the most sig- 
nificant things. 
How important is it 
for UCLA to solicit 

funds from private donors, and is priva- 
tization in line with the mission of a 
public university? 

Certainly it is in line with the mis- 
sion of a public university. Public uni- 
versities, for some time now, have 
relied upon sources of revenue other 




In the Loop is a 

question-and-answer 

session with people 

who shape 

our lives 



than the state in which they find them- 
selves. The extent to which public uni- 
versities are soliciting private support 
is greater than it has been in the past. 
Insofar as the fundamental values of 
academic freedom are concerned, 
those values are held just as deeply in 
private universities as they arem pub- 
lic universities, and they do indeed 
constrain the kinds of gifts one would 
accept and might not accept. There is 
a need to be willing to say no to some 
gifts where you fed they might inter- 
fere with academic frenlom or with 
the ability of the university to perform 
its mission, which for a public universi- 
ty is not only teaching and research 
but puMic service 
as well. The state 
provides approxi- 
mately 20 percent 
of UCLA's 
income. So we are 
more dependent 
that in the past on 
alternative 
sources. Most of 
that money is 
given for specific 
purposes that we 
deem to be impor- 
tant to meet our 
specific needs. 




Chancellor Albert Camesale discusses his plans for UCLA. 



Your previous 
experience at 
Harvard was 
looked at both posi- 
tively and negative- 
ly as far as your 
ability to fulfill the 
duties expected at 
UCLA. Some were concerned that 
because of your experience ai Harvard, 
a private utiivervly, you were not 
equipped to deal widi issues confronting 
a public university. And others pointed 
to your accompbshmenis at Harvard as 
proof of your abilities to maiutge a uni- 



versity. What similarities and differ- 
ences have you encountered here? 

My experience in the public sector 
is not as limited as it may be perceived. 
I spent nine years at North Carolina 
State University. My Ph.D. is from 
North Carolina State and I was on fac- 
ulty at North Carolina State and 1 was 
an administrator there. I spent a few 
years in government. And most of my 
career at Harvard was as professor in 
the school of government and my field 
was public policy, and the chair that I 
held was the professor of public policy 
and achninistration so what I studied 
was primarily puMic institutions. And 
finally I becanK dean of the John F. 
KcMiedy School of Government, 
which was this broad spectrum of pub- 
lic institutions and notHfor-profit insti- 



tutions. So while it's true that 1 was at 
a private university, most of my acade- 
mic career has been engaged in public 
policy and public institutions. 
Secondly, major research universities 
have more in common than is differ- 
ent. The vast majority of things are 
similar. To me the most strikmg differ- 
ence is the degree of public support for 
UCLA. The people in Los Angeles 
care deeply about UCLA whether 
they went to UCLA or not, whether 
their kids are in UCLA or not. They 
want to be involved in it and they want 
UCLA to be more involved in the 
community. Private universities' alum- 
ni fed loyal to it but others look at it 
primarily as an employer. ^ 

Do you feel the university has been 



Tfn. mttfUH 



politicized throuf^ regent appoint- 
ments? Is ^lere a danger m entrusting 
power in a board which isn 'I reflective 
of students and their concerns? 

Almost every university, public or 
private, has a board of trustees or a 
board of regents. It is rare that the 
body is reflective of the students. The 
idea of those bodies is the long4erm 
interests of the unh^crsity, as oppoied 
to students who have the shoftcst time 
horizon. 1 oonaider it my responsMity 
to have the kx^ term in mind. I don't 
bdieve that in itadfis a danger. But 
that's to be separated from polilictza- 
tion. ! think that having a body of peo- 
ple who are not employea or tfudoMs 
at the unh«rsity but care about the uni- 



Daily Bniin Viewpoint 



UCLA bids teary farewell to Katie 



TRIBliTE: Pauley Pavilion 
manager, former student 
dies of brain cancer at 36 

By John Sandbrook ' 

UCLA lost its princess last 
week. There was no royal 
family presiding, no Elton 
John song at the memorial service, 
no worldwide television coverage. 
But for the 600 or so faculty, staff 
and students who said our good- 
byes to our princefs last Friday in 
Pauley Pavilion, the sense of loss 
and sadness we felt at losing such a 
wonderful 36-year-old mother to 
brail} cancer will be not long forgot- 
ten. 

Our princess was Katie. That sin- 
gle word has been for years a magi- 
cal name around UCLA for hun- 
dreds, if not thousands of us. Her 
full name was Katherine McCarthy 
Abbott. But only one word was nec- 
_ essary to describe her: Katie. She 
was (and always will be, in spirit) 
the manager of Pauley Pavilion and 
of the Recreation and Services 
Facilities Office. But more than 
anything else, she was a Bruin. 

Like so many of us who work at 
UCLA, she was a Bruin her entire 
adult life. She came to UCLA at 
age 18 and graduated in four years. 
Her love for the campus and for all 
of us prompted her to remain here, 
working as a student supervisor in 
the newly-opened Wooden Center 
in 1983 and gradually becoming 
assistant manager (and then manag- 
er) of Pauley Pavilion. 

Katie loved- UCLA and she loved 
all of us. She loved Pauley Pavilion. 
She loved all those who walked 
through "her" building. She took 
care of all of us, from the most 
skilled varsity athletes and demand- 
ing coaches to the most unskilled 
intramural and recreational enthusi- 
asts to the fans sitting in the seats 
for the games and performances. 

No task was too large for her to 
take on. Her enthusiasm and happi- 
nesS in helping those who 
approached her with a problem or 
request was unique. Her ability to 
persuade so many of us to help her 
tesolve a problem was legendary. 
Her smile was magnetic. Her charm 

Sandbrook is assistant provost of the 
College of Letters and Science. 




was beyond description. And, 
beneath it all, everyone knew that 
her love for all 
of us motivated _______^ 

us to feel the 
same way about 
her. 

TTiere were a 
lot of stiff upper 
lips in Pauley 
Pavilion last 
Friday at her 
memorial ser- 
vice. From the 
electricians and 

plumbers at the 

facilities divi- 
sion, to the cam- 
pus fire marshall, to the coaches, to 
faculty, staff and students who 
worked with her or for her. 



Hundreds of us 

watched last Friday as 

Katie's own princess, her 

daughter Lauren, 4, and 

her husband Mike, said 

their own goodbyes. 



A lot of the men and women I 
have worked with for decades had 

moist eyes, 
• knowing that 

magical smile 
and voice and 
hug will never 
be coming from 
her again. 

How a young 
woman could 
develop brain 
cancer at age 
31, successfully 
fight it off 

through a year 

of difficult 
treatment while 
raising her newborn daughter, and 
then have it recur again as she 
turned 35 ... there is no explanation 



for that. 

And her last year with us was 
spent in a very difficult time, but 
always with her giving support to 
everyone around her without com- 
plaint. 

With heavy hearts, hundreds of 
us watched last Friday as Katie's 
own princess, her daughter Lauren, 
4, and her husband Mike, said their 
own goodbyes to Katie. And we all 
said goodbye to Katie, feeling some- 
thing that 1 don't think any of us 
will forget for a long time to come. 
There is a new spirit that is now 
part of Pauley Pavilion and its lega- 
cy. It will be there for many of us 
whenever we walk in that building 
again and remember that smile. 
That spirit will continue to be 
known by one word: Katie. 



Monday, Febniary 23, 1998 19 



Racism 

in 
America 

Prejudices still run rampant 

across the nation. Next 

Friday, Viewpoint will 

explore racism as it exists 

today in America and on 

campus. Share your 

thoughts. E-mail us at 

viewpoint@media.ucla.edu 

or bring your submissions 



to 



118 Kerckhoff Hall. 

The deadline is 

Wednesday, Feb. 25 

at 4 p.m. 



Got something to 
say, but don't 

know where to say 

it? Be a Viewpoint 

columnist! 

Applications are 

now available in 

the Daily Bruin 

office, located in 

118 Kerckhoff Hall. 
Applications are 

due Friday, Feb. 27 

at 5 p.m. Late 

applications will 

not be accepted! 



i 



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DAILY BRUIN 



118 Kerckhoff Hall 

308 Westwood Plaza 

Los Angeles, CA 90024 

(310) 825-9898 

http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



Editortol Board 

Ediru Leicovk 

Editor in Chitf 
Manhew Schmid 

Managing Editor 
J. Jioni Palmer 

Viewpoint Editor 
Christopher Bates 

Staff Ikprttentativt 
Stanley L. Johnson Jr. 

Spof ti Editor 



Cheryl Klein 

Affj A Entertainment Editor 
Diana Lee 

Production Editor 
Hannah Miller :,__ - 

News Editor 
KimStorte 

Electrorvc Media Director 
Aaron Tout 

Photo Editor 



Unsigned editorials represent a 
ntajority opinion of the Daily Bruin 
Editorial Board. All other columns, 
letters and artwork represent the 
opinions of their authors. 

All submitted material must 
bear the author's rtame, address, 
telephone number, registration 
number or affiliation with UCLA. 
Nan>es will not be withheld except 
in extreme cases. 



The Bruin complies with the 
Communication Board's policy 
prohibiting the publication of 
articles that perpetuate deroga- 
tory cultural or ethnic stereo- 
types. 

When multiple authors sub- 
mit material, some names may be 
kept on file rather than pub- 
lished with the material. The 
Bruin reserves the right to edit 



submitted material and to deter- 
mine Its placentent in the paper. 
All submissions become the 
property of The Bruin. The 
Communications Board has a 
media grievance procedure for' 
resolving complaints against any 
of its publications. For a copy of 
the complete procedure, contact 
the Publications office at Itt 
Kerckhoff Hall. 



20 Monday, Febfuary 23, 1998 



Daily Bniin Viewpoint 



ATTENTION ADVERTISER! 



Your image is everything to us. 




Advertise with the Daily Bruin 
and open the doors of your 
business to the majority of 
UCLA's students and staff. Have 
your ad done by Creative and get 
the message across to them in 
ways you have to see to believe. 



f- 



CALL 31 0-825-21 61 



HAVE YOUR AD DONE BY 



TO ADVERTISE 



THE CREATIVE DEPARTMEN' 



OOT SOMCfNING TO S€U? 

puce IT IN BIIUIN CIASSIHCD 

CAU 8S5-SSS1 



t 



UCLA's 2nd Annual Nontraditional 
Career Options for Scientists Seminar Series 

Paul van Devwiter . . ^ . Hj-tj Technology 

Sapient Corporation OpporlUluUes in lllgn 

Mr. van Deventer is a vice^pfesident wrth the Sapient Cofporation. (http;//»w»w.$«p4ent.com/) an information 
technology company based in San Francisco. He did graduate work in Aeronautical Er^neerir* at MIT. 

3:30pm Tuesday, February 24, Qrantf Salon, Kercklwff HaN 

., (Refreshments «rill be served) 
Funded by: Campos Programs Committee of the Program Activities Board. Graduate Student Assodatton. 
Career Center. Atmospheric Sciences. Chemistry & Biochemistry. Earth & Space Sciences. Mathematics & 
Statistics, and Physics & Astronomy. 

Sponsored by: Chi Epsilon Pi, UCLA Atmospheric Science Graduate Student Association, Graduate Pfiysics 
and Astronomy Society. Graduate Student Outreach. BwdMmistry Graduate Recreation Commlttae. 

littp://www.«tudeiitghMip«.ucla.edu/xep/senilnar.html ^|^ 



EF 



^ 



REMOVE HAIR PERMANENTLY 



WITH 



OECTROLYSIS 



L 



——LISA SAPON, R.E. 

1081 Wcstwood Blvd.. Ste. 224. Wcstwood, CA 90024 
Day. Evening, and Saturday Appointments Available 

W 310.208.2045 ^ 



Jr 



The 1998 




Conference 



9e/ io i/ie Jfeari ofi£e JKaiier: 

Why communfty service nu6^ you and 
why you t^ti^ community service. 



UCLA Ackertnan Grand Ballroom 

Saturday, February 28, 1998 ^-Z '■ 

9 AM '4 PM 

In its second year, the UCLA Community Service Conference strives to educate students about the importance of commu- 
nity service and provide current volunteers with a further understanding of community needs. In addition, the conference 
aims to provide a forum for those involved in community service to discuss and collaborate on issues related to the 
community. Finally, the wide variety of our speakers will provide numerous opportunities for students to network. In our 
changing society it is time for students to take a stand and "get to the heart of the matter!" 



A Few of the Confi rmed Workshop Leaders 

Tom Hayden, California State Senator 
Community Service Legislation 

Physicians for Social Responsibility 
Beyond Clinical Medicine 

UCLA School of Medicine 
Getting Involved in Health Care with 
Underserved Communities 



L.A. Team Mentoring 
Mentoring Issues 

Sophia Chang, UCLA Community Service 

Commission 

Service Learning Theory 

Cecilia Leung, UCLA Project MAC 
Child Abuse and Domestic Violence 



Prof. Gary Biasi. UCLA School of Uw 

Applying a Graduate/Law Degree to Community Service 

Joseph D. Mandel, UCLA Vice Chancellor of Legal Affairs 
Post-Proposition 209 Developments 



■tin- ■— m^rni^b,, 



e-mail: cscnfrce@ucla.6(lu 
http://stu(l6nts.asucU.ucla.edu/c$e/scanehtml 



For More I^fornuuion 

Dennis Lyday - Office of Student & Campus Life 
(310)825-4995 

Celia Cudiamat - Bruin Corps (310) 794-5661 

Community Service Commission (3 1 0) 825-2333 

Community Programs Office (310) 825-5969 

Walk-int are welcome, but 
lunekes ere not included. 

Presented bvi 

Office of Siudem «& Campus Life 
Anderson Outreach Community Service Commission 

UCLA School of Medicine Community Programs Office 

Center for Student Programming Boiin Corps 

Undergraduate Student Association Council 

Paid for by the Campuii Programs 
, Committee of the Program Activity Board 



IN THE LOOP 



From page 18 

versify having an oversight function 
and also thinking about the future is 
quite valuable. What we worry about 
most is three things that should be 
decided within the university. First is 
what we teach, second is to whom we 
teach, and third is who teaches it. That 
is the holy trinity of academia. It is 
very rare that the regents have been 
involved - not never - but it is very 
rare and it was where they felt a com- 
pelling interest to do so. .' . • 

As far as politics go, let 's go back to 
the regent meeting held here last 
November, when Gov. Pete iVilson 
made last minute appointments to try 
to swing the regents ' vote. There, poli- 
tics interfered with university policy. 

That's university policy. NotTcelt 
didn't get at the holy trinity. It didn't 
get at the things that, as chancellor, 
are at the forefront in my mind and 
the recommendation made by the 
president of UC was upheld. 



You 've opened your office to stu- 
dents and in viled them to town hall 
meetings. Ha ve students responded? 

Yes, certainly. Each time we've had 
far more students show up than we 
were able to accommodate. Generally 
we've made 10 minute appointments. 
It's extraordinarily useful to me. It's 
very important to know what's on stu- 
dents' mindsf 

You may not be able to handle 
everything on a case-by-case basis but 
are these concerns brought elsewhere? 

Most of the time students raise 
issues that are important on behalf of 
students. A student who comes in to 
talk about the university generally - 
that's an opportunity for me to ask the 
questions, Vhat do you like least, 
what do you like most? What are the 
things you think I should be con- 
cerned with? What do you think I 
should be doing?' 

Do you having a working relation- 
ship with USAC President Kandea 
Mosely and GSA President Andrew 
Westall? 

We get together from time to time 
and any time they've ever asked to see 
me I've always seen them and I've met 
with the council I asked both of them 
to serve on the advisory committee 
for the selection of the executive vice 
chancellor and both accepted. 

UCLA 's always under construction. 
It may be necessary but it's disrup- 
tive. Where are the priorities? 

It's important to note that most of 
the construction is seismic. The over- 
whelming majority stems from life 
and safety issues. The second piece is 
of facilities for student living. The next 
big project that's coming up is the new 
medical center. It will be a substantial 
project and you can see some of it 
already. The parking facility is being 
built under the soccer field and we're 
having to knock down the parking 
facility where the hospital is going to 
be. It's important that we minimize 
the inconvenience. 

UCLA is well-known for two things: 
diversity of the student body and acces- 
sibility With Proposition 209 taking 
effect for undergraduates this fall, how 
do we maintain diversity and how what 
can outreach programs accomplish ? 

Well we'll soon find out This is one 
of our very highest pnorities and I 
believe what you characterized about 
UCLA is correct that it is known for 
its diversity and accessibility and it is 
known throughout the nation and the 
worid for that, not just here. UCLA 
more than any other university 
destroyed the myth that diversity is ' — 
achieved at the expense of quality. 
Mostly we're working on the short 
run since this is, as you said, the first 
year the admissions process for under- 
graduates is affected by Proposition 



ScelNTNIL00l»|M9e21 



I ^^*^ » — W' L f*q» w m .^ ^im^ 



«''•■.■:' 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



IN THE LOOP 



From page 20 

209. There are three stages. The first 
part is doing our best to ensure that 
minority students continue to apply to 
the university, that they not feel sud- 
denly unwanted here. The second is 
fhe admissions process itself Third 
will be recruitment of those who are 
admitted - to do our very best to con- 
vince them that not only are they 
wanted but needed at IJCLA. The 
first part - the applications part - is 
now behind us. The number of appli- 
cations to UCLA went up again and 
exceeded 32,000, the most of any cam- 
pus in the UC system and I believe of 
any university anywhere. Secondly 
with regard to minority groups there 
seems to be virtually no effect of 
JProposition 209. The trends ihat we 
were seeing before 209 continue. We 
do appear to have overcome any psy- 
chological impact of 209 or SP-1 
where minority groups might have felt 
unwelcome. Next will be admissions 
which we have less control over. The 
the law precludes us from using race, 
ethnicity or gender as a factor but I 
want to make clear that we don't sim- 
ply use grade point average and SAT 
score. We never have. We've always 
had two people read every file and 
take into account what obstacles this 
student has overcome, what leader- 
ship potential do they have and a 
whole host of other factors and we will 
continue to do that and it remains to 
be seen what it will do to admissions. 
The third part is psychological again 
and that's where we can work hard. 
All of us, not just administrators - fac- 
ulty, students, alumni, particularly 
those with relationships with under- 
represented minorities have to con- 
vince those students who are admitted 
that we need them at UCLA. 



One of the keys to nuiintaining 
accessibttity and diversity is affordabili- 
ty. With dwindling state support what 's 
the priority for keeping fees down? 

1 think the way of thmking about 
the priorities is financial aid. That's 
the key to accessibility, and it's more 
the key than the fees themselves. 
There are several ways to maintain 
accessibility. One is to keep fees low 
for everybody, in which case those 
who could afford to pay much more 
pay a very low fee, but the university 
would be strapped for resources. 
Another way is to have fees increase 
moderately and have the people who 
can afford to pay it pay, and have 
financial aid available for those who 
don't. That assures accessibility but 
also provides the funds needed to 
have an excellent university. If the fees 
get too low you have accessibility to a 
university that is going to decline in 
quality. We would love 'o be able is to 
provide full need aid that any student 
who is admitted to UCLA would be 
able to afford to come here, either 
because their family could afford it or 
because there was adequate financial 
aid availability. 

What are your goals for UCLA ? 

What I said on the day of the 
announcement of my appointment 
and thereafter is that one of the things 
that excited me about coming to 
UCLA is that I believe that UCLA is 
an excellent university, clearly among 
the very top-ranked public universities 
and that UCLA is well-positioned to 
be a great university, period. By a 
great university I meant one that 
would be recognized around the 
world, that when people name great 
universities, that list has got to be 
more than five but it can't be much 
more than 10 and that UCLA should 
be on that list. I said I believed we 
were well-positioned for three rea- 
■ons. UCLA was already excellent, 
has great resources and enormous 
public support. My time here has not 
only confirmed those observations but 
has put a lot more flesh on the bones. I 
know a lot more now and they've 
strengthened my view and sense that 
the vision can be achieved. 



Monday, Ffbruary 23, 1998 21 



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